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GMPV3.1

Mineral growth and dissolution: Recent developments in the understanding of fluid-mineral processes (including Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Young Scientists Lecture)
Convener: E. Ruiz-Agudo  | Co-Conveners: A. Putnis , C. V. Putnis 
Oral Programme
 / Mon, 23 Apr, 13:30–17:45  / Room 31
Poster Programme
 / Attendance Fri, 27 Apr, 08:30–10:00  / Hall XL
Poster Summaries & DiscussionsPSD22.1  / Fri, 27 Apr, 13:30–14:15  /  
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We welcome contributions from research involved in fluid-mineral interfacial processes during crystal growth, dissolution and mineral replacement reactions. The emphasis is mainly on low temperature aqueous fluid reactions but other relevant conditions elucidating growth and dissolution processes are also applicable, including the chemical, physical or biological factors involved. Abstracts presenting either experimental and/or theoretical studies are encouraged. This includes the thermodynamics and kinetics of crystal growth and dissolution; the use of analytical methods in the understanding of growth and dissolution processes, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD); synchrotron-based analytical methods; nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), Raman spectroscopy, microtomography; environmental SEM etc.; the effect of additives on crystal growth and dissolution; the incorporation of minor elements and element partitioning during crystal growth; pressure solution; damage and fracture of porous materials induced by either chemical reaction and/or the force of salt crystallisation; and theoretical simulations using models such as molecular dynamics.
The aim of the session is to bring together current research with the common theme of understanding mineral-fluid processes in order to elucidate the important mechanisms controlling such interactions.