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GM2.4

Complexity and nonlinearity in Earth surface processes – Concepts, methods and applications
Convener: M. Keiler  | Co-Conveners: A.J.A.M. Temme , A. Lang , D. Karssenberg 
Oral Programme
 / Wed, 25 Apr, 15:30–17:00 / Room 21
Poster Programme
 / Attendance Wed, 25 Apr, 17:30–19:00 / Hall XL
Poster Summaries & DiscussionsPSD12.6 / Wed, 25 Apr, 14:30–15:15 / Room 37 
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Geomorphic systems are complex; their form, pattern and structure result from complex systems behaviour. By combining concepts and techniques of non-linear dynamics complex system research provides new insights into how geomorphic systems and Earth surface systems evolve and change. This enhanced understanding is essential for interpreting geomorphological records and for developing a better appreciation of nonlinear responses to future system changes.
The session will provide a platform for critical discussion of concepts related to complex and non-linear systems research in geomorphology and neighbouring fields. We invite contributions that focus on methods and models that are used to identify and understand complex geomorphologic systems. Topics to be addressed may include nonlinear responses and thresholds, emergence, self-organisation, phase transition, forecasting in complex systems, and coupled systems including landscape evolution models.
We encourage presentation of applied studies that integrate non-linearity concepts for solving problems relevant to society and explore advantages and constraints of using such a perspective in Earth surface research. As complexity and non-linearity often arise from local interactions between components of different systems, we also highly welcome contributions that integrate geomorphology with ecology, soil science, or hydrology.
Solicited speakers of this session are Jonathan Phillips, University of Kentucky (confirmed) and A. Brad Murray, Duke University (confirmed). We intend to publish papers in a special issue of an international journal.