Menu


Find the EGU on

Follow us on Twitter Find us on Facebook Find us on Google+ Find us on LinkedIn Find us on YouTube

Tag your tweets with #egu2013

ESSI1.3

New Data Paradigms, Modeling, and International Collaboration Strategies for Earth System Sciences
Convener: David Arctur  | Co-Conveners: Dan Lunt , Mohan Ramamurthy , Monique Petitdidier , Sandro Fiore , Kerstin Lehnert , Pierre-Philippe MATHIEU 
Orals
 / Wed, 10 Apr, 08:30–10:00  / Room R11
Posters
 / Attendance Wed, 10 Apr, 15:30–17:00  / Red Posters
<table class="mo_scheduling_string" style="border-collapse: collapse; clear:left;"><tr><td style="vertical-align: top;"><span class="apl_addon_standard_action_link" style="text-decoration: none;">Poster Summaries & Discussions</span>:&nbsp;<a href="https://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2013/session/13688" target="_blank" title="Open PSD24.1 Details" style="clear:left;">PSD24.1</a> &nbsp;/ <span class="mo_scheduling_string_time">Wed, 10 Apr, 18:30</span><span class="mo_scheduling_string_time">&ndash;19:15</span> &nbsp;/ <span class="mo_scheduling_string_place" title=""></span> &nbsp;</td></tr></table>
Increasingly, the conduct of science requires strong international scientific partnerships and sharing of knowledge, information, data, and other assets. This is particularly true in the geosciences where the highly coupled nature of the earth system and the need to understand global environmental processes and their regional linkages have brought to the fore the importance of and growing need for collaborations and partnerships across national and continental boundaries.

The climate system is far too complex a puzzle to be unraveled by individual researchers, groups or even nations. It is increasingly important to allow disparate organizations around the world to share data in an open manner, using common "community agreed" standards for web-based exchange. Collaboration on simulation software development is equally important. Truly integrated models of the Earth system require expertise that is beyond any individual institute, hence the need for reusable libraries/components/programs that are easily coupled to others.

The importance of institutional collaboration is resulting in international team efforts involving networked scientists and data providers to provide free, open, authoritative sources of quality data and software that are available with reliable and timely access for peer review and for collaborative purposes. Several of these collaborations and related technologies are presented in this session.