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GM4.6/SSS11.2

Where earth scientists meet Cleopatra: Geoarchaeology of rocks, sediments, soils and climate (co-organized)
Convener: Sjoerd Kluiving  | Co-Conveners: Matthieu Ghilardi , Vanessa Heyvaert 
Orals
 / Wed, 10 Apr, 10:30–12:00  / Room G3
 / Wed, 10 Apr, 13:30–15:00  / Room G13
Posters
 / Attendance Wed, 10 Apr, 17:30–19:00  / Blue Posters
Modern research into geoarchaeology can be described as the interaction between modern humans, our ancestors and the physical environment and as a discipline it is strongly rooted in the earth sciences. Early case studies from the geographical nuclei of human evolution and socio-technical advances in the circum-Mediterranean helped to characterise both the timing and scale of anthropogenic influence on natural sedimentary environments, the intensity of associated geomorphological processes as well as the wider impact on ecosystems. However, whilst landscape change attributed to human impact is recorded on a range of temporal scales during the Holocene epoch, the spatial evidence for change is still rather limited. Furthermore, the impacts of extreme events on ancient societies and landscapes, as well as human response are under-researched themes.
For this session, we invite case studies of human-environment interactions undertaken at any spatial scale and time period (i.e. early prehistory through to the historic archaeological period). We would particularly welcome interdisciplinary contributions that link cultural archaeological approaches (including anthropology and historical geography) with those from the geoarchaeological sciences (i.e., geomorphology, environmental archaeology, palaeoclimatology, geophysics, sedimentology, bioarchaeology, geoecology, soil science, hydrology, geochemistry and archaeometry). We would also welcome papers focused on methodological approaches and advancements (e.g. in the fields of predictive modelling, airborne remote sensing, radiometric dating and isotope studies etc.). Quaternary International is publishing a Special Issue on the Cleopatra session. This session is supported by the working group on Geoarchaeology (IAG).
Public information: Modern research into geoarchaeology can be described as the interaction between modern humans, our ancestors and the physical environment and as a discipline it is strongly rooted in the earth sciences. Early case studies from the geographical nuclei of human evolution and socio-technical advances in the circum-Mediterranean helped to characterise both the timing and scale of anthropogenic influence on natural sedimentary environments, the intensity of associated geomorphological processes as well as the wider impact on ecosystems. However, whilst landscape change attributed to human impact is recorded on a range of temporal scales during the Holocene epoch, the spatial evidence for change is still rather limited. Furthermore, the impacts of extreme events on ancient societies and landscapes, as well as human response are under-researched themes.
For this session, we invite case studies of human-environment interactions undertaken at any spatial scale and time period (i.e. early prehistory through to the historic archaeological period). We would particularly welcome interdisciplinary contributions that link cultural archaeological approaches (including anthropology and historical geography) with those from the geoarchaeological sciences (i.e., geomorphology, environmental archaeology, palaeoclimatology, geophysics, sedimentology, bioarchaeology, geoecology, soil science, hydrology, geochemistry and archaeometry). We would also welcome papers focused on methodological approaches and advancements (e.g. in the fields of predictive modelling, airborne remote sensing, radiometric dating and isotope studies etc.). Quaternary International is publishing a Special Issue on the Cleopatra session. This session is supported by the working group on Geoarchaeology (IAG).