Menu


Find the EGU on

Follow us on Twitter Find us on Facebook Find us on Google+ Find us on LinkedIn Find us on YouTube

SSS3.3

Use of soil records in geoecology and landscape archaeology
Convener: Sjoerd Kluiving  | Co-Conveners: Ian Simpson , Jan van Mourik , Daniela Sauer , Claudio Zaccone 
Orals
 / Wed, 30 Apr, 15:30–17:15  / Room B11
Posters
 / Attendance Wed, 30 Apr, 17:30–19:00  / Blue Posters
<table class="mo_scheduling_string" style="border-collapse: collapse; clear:left;"><tr><td style="vertical-align: top;"><span class="apl_addon_standard_action_link" style="text-decoration: none;">Poster Summaries & Discussions</span>:&nbsp;<a href="https://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2014/session/16492" target="_blank" title="Open PSD9.7 Details" style="clear:left;">PSD9.7</a> &nbsp;/ <span class="mo_scheduling_string_time">Wed, 30 Apr, 13:30</span><span class="mo_scheduling_string_time">&ndash;14:15</span> &nbsp;/ <span class="mo_scheduling_string_place" title=""></span> &nbsp;</td></tr></table>
Soils and paleosoils contain information, related to soil genesis and relate consequently to landscape evolution. Information from (palaeo)soils is relevant to contribute to the evolution of soil systems, natural and cultural landscapes. Soil records are relevant for disciplines as soils science, archaeology and landscape ecology. Several analytical techniques are available to ‘read’ the (paleo)soils records. Landscape archaeology is the science of material traces of past peoples within the context of their interactions with the wider natural and social environment they inhabited. Scope of this session is the application of of innovative techniques in soil archives analysis and of (palaeo)pedological knowledge in geomorphological landscape evolution, incl. cultural landscapes. Are there innovating techniques with potentials for soil archive analysis? A challenging contrast is the comparison between palaeosols properties as the result of the natural soil genesis and actual soil properties as the result of soil genesis, affected by environmental management. How can we transfer changing soil properties into soil system dynamics? To what extent are archaeological traces able to show a time record of palaeosols? Changing environmental and climatological conditions have been recorded in palaeosols and it is a challenge to use palaeopedology to reconstruct palaeolandscapes.

How do we transfer observed changes in soil systems into changes in land use and consequently in landscape dynamics? How do soil parameters that reflect the effect and intensity in natural surface processes compare with the effect and cultural processes that change the landscape? Are patterns of human dispersal, e.g. sedentary land occupation, a cause of changing soil properties? What is the effect of timing and intensity of anthropogenic influence on soil properties? How can pedological knowledge contribute to wider questions of sustainability and resilience? We call for papers that reflect on one of the above stated questions, or on one of the following themes, although not restricted: a) Soils reflecting the combined history of geomorphological processes, b)Soils as mirrors of ecological conditions, c)(Palaeo)Soils containing relicts, associated with preceding phases in landscape development, d) Soils in understanding the origins and continuity of the Anthropocene, e) Soils related to archaeological dating, f) Soils related to resilient and sustainable communities, g) Soils as records of human mediated historical land degradation. We intend to select the best abstracts for the production of a special volumes of a peer reviewed journal. If you have affinity with soils as records of the past, share your results with us and upload your abstract for this session: Use of soil records in geoecology and landscape archaeology. More information at s.j.kluiving@vu.nl
Public information: Soils and paleosoils contain information, related to soil genesis and relate consequently to landscape evolution. Information from (palaeo)soils is relevant to contribute to the evolution of soil systems, natural and cultural landscapes. Soil records are relevant for disciplines as soils science, archaeology and landscape ecology. Several analytical techniques are available to ‘read’ the (paleo)soils records. Landscape archaeology is the science of material traces of past peoples within the context of their interactions with the wider natural and social environment they inhabited. Scope of this session is the application of of innovative techniques in soil archives analysis and of (palaeo)pedological knowledge in geomorphological landscape evolution, incl. cultural landscapes. Are there innovating techniques with potentials for soil archive analysis? A challenging contrast is the comparison between palaeosols properties as the result of the natural soil genesis and actual soil properties as the result of soil genesis, affected by environmental management. How can we transfer changing soil properties into soil system dynamics? To what extent are archaeological traces able to show a time record of palaeosols? Changing environmental and climatological conditions have been recorded in palaeosols and it is a challenge to use palaeopedology to reconstruct palaeolandscapes.

How do we transfer observed changes in soil systems into changes in land use and consequently in landscape dynamics? How do soil parameters that reflect the effect and intensity in natural surface processes compare with the effect and cultural processes that change the landscape? Are patterns of human dispersal, e.g. sedentary land occupation, a cause of changing soil properties? What is the effect of timing and intensity of anthropogenic influence on soil properties? How can pedological knowledge contribute to wider questions of sustainability and resilience? We call for papers that reflect on one of the above stated questions, or on one of the following themes, although not restricted: a) Soils reflecting the combined history of geomorphological processes, b)Soils as mirrors of ecological conditions, c)(Palaeo)Soils containing relicts, associated with preceding phases in landscape development, d) Soils in understanding the origins and continuity of the Anthropocene, e) Soils related to archaeological dating, f) Soils related to resilient and sustainable communities, g) Soils as records of human mediated historical land degradation. We intend to select the best abstracts for the production of a special volumes of a peer reviewed journal. If you have affinity with soils as records of the past, share your results with us and upload your abstract for this session: Use of soil records in geoecology and landscape archaeology. More information at s.j.kluiving@vu.nl