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GM11.1/PS9.2/SSP3.17/SSS9.2 Media

Aeolian Processes and Landforms (both on Earth and other Planets) (co-organized)
Convener: Joanna Nield  | Co-Conveners: John Gillies , Matthew Baddock , Clement Narteau , Sebastien Rodriguez , Antoine Lucas , Lydie Staron , Sylvain Courrech du Pont , Greg Okin 
Orals
 / Mon, 18 Apr, 08:30–12:00  / Room K1
Posters
 / Attendance Mon, 18 Apr, 17:30–19:00  / Hall X1
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Aeolian processes operate at a myriad of spatial and temporal scales. Process and form are linked by feedback mechanisms that drive the evolution of forms and at the larger scale the landscape itself. The special tenth anniversary edition of this session brings together research traversing the spectrum of scale, from long term landscape dating and evolution modelling to small-scale process studies. It will be of interest to researchers that study wind-blown sediment and associated bedforms in a range of environments, from coastal and semi-arid regions, to hyper arid deserts. We also highlight planetary dune field studies within this session. Contributions that use novel instrumentation in field studies, remote sensing at the landscape scale or innovative numerical modelling methods, are encouraged, particularly those which attempt to elucidate feedback between surface properties and sediment transport.

This session is supported by the British Society for Geomorphology (BSG).

This session includes a solicited abstract co-authored by the original convenors of this session when it first appeared at EGU ten years ago (Andreas Baas, KCL, andreas.baas@kcl.ac.uk; Giles Wiggs, Oxford, giles.wiggs@ouce.ox.ac.uk; Philippe Claudin, ESPCI, claudin@pmmh.espci.fr) looking back at how aeolian research has changed and where it is going.

Within the session there will also be special mention made of planetary dune processes. Thanks to the actual programs of extensive observation and exploration of Mars and Titan, our knowledge of these planetary bodies has greatly improved. Atmospheric phenomena and landscapes on Mars and Titan bear striking resemblance with those on Earth. In particular, extensive dune fields were observed on these distant bodies, showing that dunes can form throughout the solar system under extremely various planetary environments. Dunes provide a powerful tool to investigate the physics of granular media, but also the sedimentary and climatic history of arid and semi-arid environments (such as on Earth deserts, and more globally on Mars and Titan). However, despite intensive studies of planetary dunes, many questions regarding their origins, composition, morphology, age and dynamics under present and past climatic conditions remain unanswered. Contributions that use theory of grain mechanics and sediment transport, numerical modelling, laboratory experiments, field and remote sensing data, with the aim at studying the processes through which dunes form and shape on Earth, Mars and Titan are encouraged.
Public information: Aeolian processes operate at a myriad of spatial and temporal scales. Process and form are linked by feedback mechanisms that drive the evolution of forms and at the larger scale the landscape itself. The special tenth anniversary edition of this session brings together research traversing the spectrum of scale, from long term landscape dating and evolution modelling to small-scale process studies. It will be of interest to researchers that study wind-blown sediment and associated bedforms in a range of environments, from coastal and semi-arid regions, to hyper arid deserts. We also highlight planetary dune field studies within this session. Contributions that use novel instrumentation in field studies, remote sensing at the landscape scale or innovative numerical modelling methods, are encouraged, particularly those which attempt to elucidate feedback between surface properties and sediment transport.

This session is supported by the British Society for Geomorphology (BSG).

This session includes a solicited abstract co-authored by the original convenors of this session when it first appeared at EGU ten years ago (Andreas Baas, KCL, andreas.baas@kcl.ac.uk; Giles Wiggs, Oxford, giles.wiggs@ouce.ox.ac.uk; Philippe Claudin, ESPCI, claudin@pmmh.espci.fr) looking back at how aeolian research has changed and where it is going.

Within the session there will also be special mention made of planetary dune processes. Thanks to the actual programs of extensive observation and exploration of Mars and Titan, our knowledge of these planetary bodies has greatly improved. Atmospheric phenomena and landscapes on Mars and Titan bear striking resemblance with those on Earth. In particular, extensive dune fields were observed on these distant bodies, showing that dunes can form throughout the solar system under extremely various planetary environments. Dunes provide a powerful tool to investigate the physics of granular media, but also the sedimentary and climatic history of arid and semi-arid environments (such as on Earth deserts, and more globally on Mars and Titan). However, despite intensive studies of planetary dunes, many questions regarding their origins, composition, morphology, age and dynamics under present and past climatic conditions remain unanswered. Contributions that use theory of grain mechanics and sediment transport, numerical modelling, laboratory experiments, field and remote sensing data, with the aim at studying the processes through which dunes form and shape on Earth, Mars and Titan are encouraged.