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AS3.1

Aerosol Chemistry and Microphysics (Arne Richter Award for Outstanding ECSs Lecture by Federico Bianchi)
Convener: Francis Pope  | Co-Conveners: Ulrich Krieger , David Topping , Markus Kalberer 
Orals
 / Wed, 26 Apr, 08:30–12:15  / 13:30–15:00  / Room F1
Posters
 / Attendance Wed, 26 Apr, 17:30–19:00  / Hall X5
This is a general open session on all aspects of Aerosol Chemistry and Microphysics. Contributions from aerosol laboratory, field, remote sensing and model studies are all highly encouraged.

As in previous years, this year the session will dedicate some of its time to focus on a hot topic which this year is aerosol photochemistry. Hence, beside general contributions to aerosol chemistry and microphysics we also encourage submission of abstracts which investigate aerosol photochemistry in particular. Aerosol photochemistry can result in, amongst other processes, bond cleavage, photoisomerization and photosenstization of molecules in the bulk and at the surface of aerosol particles. These photochemical reactions are atmospherically important. They can initiate free radical chemistry and hence can lead to composition changes. Atmospheric aerosol can contain photocatalysts such as TiO2 which is found in mineral dust particles. Photochemistry has been known to affect the toxicity of aerosol particle components such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The photochemistry of aerosol particles can also impact upon the concentrations of important gas phase species such as O3 and NOx. In recent years, much work has been performed on aerosol photochemistry and important results have been uncovered. This mini-session will provide an exciting review of existing results and a preview of upcoming results.

An invited talk will be given by Prof. Christian George from the Institut de recherches sur la catalyse l’environnement de Lyon (IRCELYON), France. Who will provide an introduction and background to aerosol photochemistry whilst also providing details on his own ground breaking research.