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SSS6.2/BG9.11

Soil organic matter turnover: from molecules to ecosystems and back again (co-organized)
Convener: Boris Jansen  | Co-Conveners: Karen Vancampenhout , Cornelia Rumpel 
Orals
 / Wed, 26 Apr, 08:30–10:15  / Room -2.47
Posters
 / Attendance Wed, 26 Apr, 17:30–19:00  / Hall X1
This session is endorsed by the Soil Chemistry Commission of the International Union of Soil Sciences (IUSS).
In this session we hope to discuss this fascinating topic together with a wide range of scientists from various fields, but all focusing on soil organic matter turnover.

We specifically encourage young scientists to join in and submit an abstract and grab this opportunity to showcase their refreshing ideas, newest data or out-of-the-box approach.

In addition to the standard grant possibilities offered by the EGU, the IUSS therefore generously offers three grants of 500€ each to (partially) compensate registration fee and travel expenses of three young scientists presenting in the session. Application for this is now closed.

We hope to see you all in Vienna!

Boris Jansen & Karen Vancampenhout

DETAILED SESSION DESCRIPTION
Soil organic matter turnover is a hot topic in the soil sciences community. In the last decades we have seen a drastic shift in the scientific perceptions surrounding this crucial process. The paradigm of soil organic matter stabilization being linked to complex molecular composition has come under increasing scrutiny. Instead, external factors such as environmental conditions and ecosystem composition are increasingly seen as being of overriding importance: any part of soil organic matter can and will be broken down under the right circumstances.

But what happens if conditions for turnover are suboptimal? Does molecular composition play a role in determining soil organic matter turnover then? And what about the links between environment, ecosystem and molecular composition of soil organic matter? For instance, variation of clay mineral contents is seen as an important ecosystem property that affects soil organic matter turnover through interaction with soil organic matter. However, such interaction in turn depends on the molecular composition, i.e. type and number of functional groups, of soil organic matter.

In this session we hope to discuss this fascinating topic together with a wide range of scientists from various fields, but all focusing on soil organic matter turnover. From scientists looking at soil organic matter turnover at the ecosystem scale in various ecosystems and environments, to the colleagues looking at the details of soil organic matter interactions at the molecular scale. From those focusing on field observations, through those using advanced characterization techniques in the laboratory, to those using modeling approaches. Thus we hope to fuel a discussion about linking the various scales and processes of soil organic matter turnover from molecules to ecosystems.

DETAILS ABOUT THE YOUNG SCIENTISTS GRANTS
This session is endorsed by the Soil Chemistry Commission of the International Union of Soil Sciences. To stimulate the participation of young scientists, in addition to the standard grant possibilities offered by the EGU, the IUSS generously offers three grants of €500 each to (partially) compensate registration fee and travel expenses of three young scientists presenting in the session.

To qualify for one of the IUSS grants you must:
- Currently be a MSc student or PhD student, or working in your first PostDoc position (no more than 2 years after completing your PhD).

- Submit an abstract to our session that is related to your current MSc, PhD or PostDoc research through the conventional EGU abstract submission system. This can be for an oral or a poster presentation.

- Send an e-mail message to bjansen439@gmail.com in which you indicate you wish to apply for a grant, and attach your curriculum vitae that includes your current position as well as your abstract once more to facilitate our administration.

From the abstracts of young scientists allocated an oral or poster presentation in our session after the normal abstract selection procedure, we will construct a shortlist of the 10 best abstracts (based on scientific value and originality). From this shortlist we will then randomly draw three abstracts that will be given a young scientist grant.

To receive the money you will have to supply prove of qualifying costs incurred of at least €500. Qualifying costs are the registration fee, the abstract submission fee, travel costs (train ticket, plane ticket, etc.) and accommodation costs during the conference. The money will be transferred to your bank account immediately after completion of the conference.

Please note that our grants are independent of the standard grant opportunities offered by the EGU. Therefore, it is possible to apply to both and to combine both as long as the total grant amount does not exceed total qualified costs incurred (see previous). For example, if your registration fee is already covered by an EGU grant, you cannot use it as a qualified cost for our young scientist grant.

The deadline for the young scientist grant application for our session is the same as the EGU abstract submission deadline: 11 January 2017. The deadline for the general EGU grant applications is 1 December 2016.