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HS8.3.4/SSS13.81

Soil-Root Interactions (co-organized)
Convener: Valentin Couvreur  | Co-Conveners: Mathieu Javaux , Nicolai Koebernick , Adi Perelman , M. Zarebanadkouki 
Orals
 / Fri, 13 Apr, 13:30–17:00  / Room 1.61
Posters
 / Attendance Fri, 13 Apr, 17:30–19:00  / Hall A
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The interactions between plants and their environment in biogeochemical cycles have drawn substantial attention in the domains of soil science, hydrology, plant physiology, ecology and climatology in recent years. This interest stems from the need for improved predictability of plant-related transfer processes to face fundamental environmental and agricultural issues, like for instance crop drought tolerance, contaminant transport, and the impact of global change on plant mediated resource and energy fluxes in terrestrial systems.
Emerging experimental techniques and system modeling tools have deepened our insights into the functioning of water and nutrient transport processes in the soil-root system. Yet, quantitative approaches connectable across disciplines and scales nowadays constitute step stones to foster our understanding of fundamental biophysical processes at the frontier of soil and roots.

This session targets researchers investigating plant-related resource transfer processes from the rhizosphere to the field scale, and aims at gathering scientists from multiple disciplines ranging from soil physics to plant physiology. This includes:
- Novel experimental techniques assessing below-ground plant processes
- Measuring and modeling soil and plant water fluxes across scales
- Bridging the gap between biology and soil physics through numerical modeling
- Plant water and nutrient uptake under abiotic stress
- Impact of plant uptake on solute transport in soil
Public information: Invited talks:
“The mechanical costs of living underground” by Dani Or (ETH Zurich)
"Root water uptake and long-distance transport under drought: Novel insights into intact plants using X-ray computed microtomography" by Thorsten Knipfer (University of California, Davis)