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SMP21

Meeting of the Models: Launch of OpenHydrology
Convener: Rolf Hut  | Co-Conveners: Nick van de Giesen , Niels Drost 
Tue, 10 Apr, 12:15–13:15  / Room 2.61
We cordially invite you to our first OpenHydrology splinter meeting. Joins us for an open discussion on best practices in sharing of hydrological models and data. Connect with your fellow Open Science enthusiast, discover new models to run your data on, or new data to force your model with!

This will be a “bring your own lunch” meeting, but we will bring dessert!

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From a hydrological point of view, every field, every street, every part of the world, is different. We understand quite well how water moves through plants and soils at small scales but the medium is never the same from one spot to the next. This is the curse of locality. It is difficult to capture such processes with a single global model.

Still, it might be very interesting if there were a computational environment in which you could readily include your local knowledge in a global model. In such an environment, also ideas about process representation can be encoded at a global level to test improvements. In the framework of the eWaterCycle project (see: http://forecast.ewatercycle.org), such an environment will be built that allows anyone to include their models within a global model. Input data, data assimilation, and performance metrics will be provided and generated automatically so you can focus on what you think should be improved. Present partners are Delft University of Technology, Netherlands eScience Center, Utrecht University, and Deltares. The plan is to to build a community multi-model environment that allows rapid and easy combination of local hydrological models with global models, leading to a collaborative environment where anyone can easily contribute to the greater goal of a community built and shared global Hydrological model. Your input is needed to ensure the optimal environment will be created and to build a true community model.

At this splinter meeting we will start an active association of scientists, OpenHydrology, that supports this community model. We invite you all to become a founding member of the OpenHydrology community. At this splintermeeting we will present our vision for OpenHydrology and hope you will share your ideas on how we can work together as a global open hydrological community.

The eWaterCycle II project will build and maintain an e-Infrastructure that allows for quick and safe inclusion of sub-models and model concepts into global hydrological models, leading ultimately to a better understanding of the Hydrological cycle. The foreseen e-infrastructure will have a number of unique advantages, including an ability for knowledge gap discovery, machine-assisted model curation, and easily changeable model parts. By being a founding member of OpenHydrology you get to actively be part in determining the course of this community and be among the first to use the tools developed within the eWaterCycle project.
Public information: We cordially invite you to our first OpenHydrology splinter meeting. Joins us for an open discussion on best practices in sharing of hydrological models and data. Connect with your fellow Open Science enthusiast, discover new models to run your data on, or new data to force your model with!

This will be a “bring your own lunch” meeting, but we will bring dessert!

----

From a hydrological point of view, every field, every street, every part of the world, is different. We understand quite well how water moves through plants and soils at small scales but the medium is never the same from one spot to the next. This is the curse of locality. It is difficult to capture such processes with a single global model.

Still, it might be very interesting if there were a computational environment in which you could readily include your local knowledge in a global model. In such an environment, also ideas about process representation can be encoded at a global level to test improvements. In the framework of the eWaterCycle project (see: http://forecast.ewatercycle.org), such an environment will be built that allows anyone to include their models within a global model. Input data, data assimilation, and performance metrics will be provided and generated automatically so you can focus on what you think should be improved. Present partners are Delft University of Technology, Netherlands eScience Center, Utrecht University, and Deltares. The plan is to to build a community multi-model environment that allows rapid and easy combination of local hydrological models with global models, leading to a collaborative environment where anyone can easily contribute to the greater goal of a community built and shared global Hydrological model. Your input is needed to ensure the optimal environment will be created and to build a true community model.

At this splinter meeting we will start an active association of scientists, OpenHydrology, that supports this community model. We invite you all to become a founding member of the OpenHydrology community. At this splintermeeting we will present our vision for OpenHydrology and hope you will share your ideas on how we can work together as a global open hydrological community.

The eWaterCycle II project will build and maintain an e-Infrastructure that allows for quick and safe inclusion of sub-models and model concepts into global hydrological models, leading ultimately to a better understanding of the Hydrological cycle. The foreseen e-infrastructure will have a number of unique advantages, including an ability for knowledge gap discovery, machine-assisted model curation, and easily changeable model parts. By being a founding member of OpenHydrology you get to actively be part in determining the course of this community and be among the first to use the tools developed within the eWaterCycle project.