NH9.1

The purpose of this session is to: (1) showcase the current state-of-the-art in global and continental scale natural hazard risk science, assessment, and application; (2) foster broader exchange of knowledge, datasets, methods, models, and good practice between scientists and practitioners working on different natural hazards and across disciplines globally; and (3) collaboratively identify future research avenues.
Reducing natural hazard risk is high on the global political agenda. For example, it is at the heart of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction and the Warsaw International Mechanism for Loss and Damage Associated with Climate Change Impacts. In response, the last 5 years has seen an explosion in the number of scientific datasets, methods, and models for assessing risk at the global and continental scale. More and more, these datasets, methods and models are being applied together with stakeholders in the decision decision-making process.
We invite contributions related to all aspects of natural hazard risk assessment at the continental to global scale, including contributions focusing on single hazards, multiple hazards, or a combination or cascade of hazards. We also encourage contributions examining the use of scientific methods in practice, and the appropriate use of continental to global risk assessment data in efforts to reduce risks. Furthermore, we encourage contributions focusing on globally applicable methods, such as novel methods for using globally available datasets and models to force more local models or inform more local risk assessment.
At various scales from global to local, many efforts on the collection and use of loss data related to natural hazards (e.g. cyclone, earthquake, flood, wildfire) as well as open datasets have been made in recent years. The integration of these socioeconomic loss databases and open datasets for loss and risk assessment allow for effective use for both science and policy, and to create a community linking academia, government and insurance.
We also encourage you to submit a manuscript to the NHESS special issue on Global- and continental-scale risk assessment for natural hazards (https://www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/special_issue966.html). Deadline for submissions to the special issues is 31 December 2019.

Public information:
Public information:
The discussion of the displays in this session will be carried out in five blocks of 20 minutes. The authors who have indicated that they will present their Displays have been assigned to one of the blocks, and the time-schedule is as follows:
14:00-14:05: welcome and structure of the session
14:05-14:25: Finn Løvholt, Adrien Pothon, Krescencja Glapiak, Svetlana Stripajova
14:25-14:45: Jana Sillmann, Gaby Gründemann, Dominik Paprotny, Edwin Sutanudjaja
14:45-15:05: Oliver Wing (sollicited), Jerom Aerts, Dirk Eilander, Viet Dung Nguyen
15:05-15:25: Robert McCall, Samuel Eberenz, John Hillier, Maria Chertova
15:25-15:45: Claudia Wolff, Jacopo Margutti, Paola Salvati, Sara Lindersson
15:45: Closing remarks

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Co-organized by AS4/HS2.5
Convener: Philip Ward | Co-conveners: Hannah Cloke, James DaniellECSECS, Hessel Winsemius, Jeroen Aerts, John K. HillierECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)

The purpose of this session is to: (1) showcase the current state-of-the-art in global and continental scale natural hazard risk science, assessment, and application; (2) foster broader exchange of knowledge, datasets, methods, models, and good practice between scientists and practitioners working on different natural hazards and across disciplines globally; and (3) collaboratively identify future research avenues.
Reducing natural hazard risk is high on the global political agenda. For example, it is at the heart of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction and the Warsaw International Mechanism for Loss and Damage Associated with Climate Change Impacts. In response, the last 5 years has seen an explosion in the number of scientific datasets, methods, and models for assessing risk at the global and continental scale. More and more, these datasets, methods and models are being applied together with stakeholders in the decision decision-making process.
We invite contributions related to all aspects of natural hazard risk assessment at the continental to global scale, including contributions focusing on single hazards, multiple hazards, or a combination or cascade of hazards. We also encourage contributions examining the use of scientific methods in practice, and the appropriate use of continental to global risk assessment data in efforts to reduce risks. Furthermore, we encourage contributions focusing on globally applicable methods, such as novel methods for using globally available datasets and models to force more local models or inform more local risk assessment.
At various scales from global to local, many efforts on the collection and use of loss data related to natural hazards (e.g. cyclone, earthquake, flood, wildfire) as well as open datasets have been made in recent years. The integration of these socioeconomic loss databases and open datasets for loss and risk assessment allow for effective use for both science and policy, and to create a community linking academia, government and insurance.
We also encourage you to submit a manuscript to the NHESS special issue on Global- and continental-scale risk assessment for natural hazards (https://www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/special_issue966.html). Deadline for submissions to the special issues is 31 December 2019.

Public information: Public information:
The discussion of the displays in this session will be carried out in five blocks of 20 minutes. The authors who have indicated that they will present their Displays have been assigned to one of the blocks, and the time-schedule is as follows:
14:00-14:05: welcome and structure of the session
14:05-14:25: Finn Løvholt, Adrien Pothon, Krescencja Glapiak, Svetlana Stripajova
14:25-14:45: Jana Sillmann, Gaby Gründemann, Dominik Paprotny, Edwin Sutanudjaja
14:45-15:05: Oliver Wing (sollicited), Jerom Aerts, Dirk Eilander, Viet Dung Nguyen
15:05-15:25: Robert McCall, Samuel Eberenz, John Hillier, Maria Chertova
15:25-15:45: Claudia Wolff, Jacopo Margutti, Paola Salvati, Sara Lindersson
15:45: Closing remarks

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