NH4.3

Field evidence collected after past earthquakes worldwide demonstrated that damage depends on both the transient and the permanent deformations. They, in turn, are related to earthquake source and path, local geological and geotechnical conditions, structural design and construction features. Seismic microzonation (SM) focuses on the assessment of the first two factors and therefore represents the basis of a sustainable policy for earthquake risk mitigation. It requires multidisciplinary approach with major contributions from seismology, geology and geotechnical engineering. SM can be approached with an increasing level of detail (I-II-III) proportional to the scale, the subsoil characterization and to the reference seismic motion. The results of SM are typically provided through maps or models describing the territorial variability in terms of stable areas, marked by a more or less high ground motion amplification potential, and unstable areas that may also be affected by surface faulting/fracturing, soil liquefaction or seismically induced landslides. Although, seismic microzonation also involves mapping of buildings and their vulnerability, this session is focused on the 'hazard' part only, concerning the classical approaches and the case studies for:
- Subsoil investigation and characterization for SM mapping;
- Multi-level SM mapping
- Evaluation of seismic site response (1D-2D-3D)
- Assessment of seismic-induced landslides
- Studies on Soil liquefaction
Innovative contributions on soil non-linearity and damping, seismic monitoring and hazard assessment effects are also welcome.

Share:
Convener: Giovanni ForteECSECS | Co-conveners: Hans-Balder Havenith, Filippo Santucci de Magistris
Field evidence collected after past earthquakes worldwide demonstrated that damage depends on both the transient and the permanent deformations. They, in turn, are related to earthquake source and path, local geological and geotechnical conditions, structural design and construction features. Seismic microzonation (SM) focuses on the assessment of the first two factors and therefore represents the basis of a sustainable policy for earthquake risk mitigation. It requires multidisciplinary approach with major contributions from seismology, geology and geotechnical engineering. SM can be approached with an increasing level of detail (I-II-III) proportional to the scale, the subsoil characterization and to the reference seismic motion. The results of SM are typically provided through maps or models describing the territorial variability in terms of stable areas, marked by a more or less high ground motion amplification potential, and unstable areas that may also be affected by surface faulting/fracturing, soil liquefaction or seismically induced landslides. Although, seismic microzonation also involves mapping of buildings and their vulnerability, this session is focused on the 'hazard' part only, concerning the classical approaches and the case studies for:
- Subsoil investigation and characterization for SM mapping;
- Multi-level SM mapping
- Evaluation of seismic site response (1D-2D-3D)
- Assessment of seismic-induced landslides
- Studies on Soil liquefaction
Innovative contributions on soil non-linearity and damping, seismic monitoring and hazard assessment effects are also welcome.