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CR6.4

Ice-ocean-atmosphere interactions in the Weddell Sea play an important role in the formation of dense water masses and in modulating the rate of ice discharge from Antarctica. Recent ocean- and atmosphere-induced changes to the ice shelves that fringe the margins of the Weddell Sea, including the disintegration of Larsen A and B, have been linked to the acceleration, retreat and thinning of the glaciers that once drained into and sustained the ice shelves. Together with the calving of iceberg A-68 from Larsen C Ice Shelf, these phenomena have raised questions about the past and future stability of this sector, and have motivated much scientific research focused on elucidating the role of ice, ocean and atmosphere interactions in controlling rates of glaciological and oceanographic change over palaeo- to contemporary timescales. In addition, this research plays a key role in informing on-going international discussions regarding the inclusion of the Weddell Sea Sector as a marine protected area (MPA).

In light of on-going research within these themes, we welcome contributions examining the range of controls driving cryospheric, oceanic and atmospheric change in the Weddell Sea, across a range of timescales. Remotely sensed observations, model results, and fieldwork-based studies are particularly encouraged.

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Co-organized by
Convener: Christine BatchelorECSECS | Co-conveners: Frazer ChristieECSECS, Katherine HutchinsonECSECS

Ice-ocean-atmosphere interactions in the Weddell Sea play an important role in the formation of dense water masses and in modulating the rate of ice discharge from Antarctica. Recent ocean- and atmosphere-induced changes to the ice shelves that fringe the margins of the Weddell Sea, including the disintegration of Larsen A and B, have been linked to the acceleration, retreat and thinning of the glaciers that once drained into and sustained the ice shelves. Together with the calving of iceberg A-68 from Larsen C Ice Shelf, these phenomena have raised questions about the past and future stability of this sector, and have motivated much scientific research focused on elucidating the role of ice, ocean and atmosphere interactions in controlling rates of glaciological and oceanographic change over palaeo- to contemporary timescales. In addition, this research plays a key role in informing on-going international discussions regarding the inclusion of the Weddell Sea Sector as a marine protected area (MPA).

In light of on-going research within these themes, we welcome contributions examining the range of controls driving cryospheric, oceanic and atmospheric change in the Weddell Sea, across a range of timescales. Remotely sensed observations, model results, and fieldwork-based studies are particularly encouraged.