CR7.1

Decreasing sea-ice coverage, increasing permafrost-derived inputs and increasing ice sheet and glacier discharge will continue to affect high latitude environments in the coming decades under all future climate scenarios. Such changes at the interface between the ocean and the cryosphere raise questions about the downstream effects in marine ecosystems, as increased meltwater discharge is likely to impact not only coastal hydrology but also biogeochemistry, sediment transport and ecosystem services such as fisheries and carbon sequestration. However, the impact of increasing melt on fjord and coastal environments is poorly constrained, impacting our ability to make predictions regarding the consequences of future climate change. In order to understand the effect of changing cryosphere-derived inputs on high latitude fjords and marine coastal environments, knowledge concerning the physical and biochemical perturbations occurring in the sea ice and water column and the structure, function and resilience of affected ecosystems must be integrated. In this session we explicitly welcome cross-disciplinary attempts to understand how far reaching the effects of sea-ice, permafrost derived material and glacial changes are on marine biogeochemistry, productivity, biodiversity, and ecosystem services. Topics may include, yet are not limited to, the effect of sea-ice, permafrost, and glacier discharge on sea-ice and water column structure, primary and secondary production, community structure, macronutrient and micronutrient availability, microbial processes, the carbonate system, and the biological carbon pump. Modelling experiments, and studies based on long-term observational records including sediment traps and proxy reconstructions from marine sediment cores are also welcome.

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Co-organized by BG4/CL4/OS3
Convener: Sofia Ribeiro | Co-conveners: Jade HattonECSECS, Mark HopwoodECSECS, Letizia Tedesco, Anna Pienkowski, Jonathan HawkingsECSECS, Susann Henkel, Hong Chin NgECSECS
Displays
| Thu, 07 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)

Decreasing sea-ice coverage, increasing permafrost-derived inputs and increasing ice sheet and glacier discharge will continue to affect high latitude environments in the coming decades under all future climate scenarios. Such changes at the interface between the ocean and the cryosphere raise questions about the downstream effects in marine ecosystems, as increased meltwater discharge is likely to impact not only coastal hydrology but also biogeochemistry, sediment transport and ecosystem services such as fisheries and carbon sequestration. However, the impact of increasing melt on fjord and coastal environments is poorly constrained, impacting our ability to make predictions regarding the consequences of future climate change. In order to understand the effect of changing cryosphere-derived inputs on high latitude fjords and marine coastal environments, knowledge concerning the physical and biochemical perturbations occurring in the sea ice and water column and the structure, function and resilience of affected ecosystems must be integrated. In this session we explicitly welcome cross-disciplinary attempts to understand how far reaching the effects of sea-ice, permafrost derived material and glacial changes are on marine biogeochemistry, productivity, biodiversity, and ecosystem services. Topics may include, yet are not limited to, the effect of sea-ice, permafrost, and glacier discharge on sea-ice and water column structure, primary and secondary production, community structure, macronutrient and micronutrient availability, microbial processes, the carbonate system, and the biological carbon pump. Modelling experiments, and studies based on long-term observational records including sediment traps and proxy reconstructions from marine sediment cores are also welcome.

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