SM5.1

Recent advances in deformation sensing have led to new applications in various geophysical disciplines such as earthquake physics, broadband seismology, volcanology, seismic exploration, strong ground motion, earthquake engineering and geodesy.
New developments in translation, rotation and strain sensing enable the complete observation of seismic ground motion and deformation. Applications are manifold, ranging from the reduction of nonuniqueness in seismic inverse problems to the characterization, separation and reconstruction of the seismic wavefield.
Among others, fibre optic technologies is bound to become a standard tool for crustal exploration and seismic monitoring thanks to: (i) easier installation (low cost, simpler installation and maintenance, robustness in harsh environment); (ii) high spatial and temporal resolution over long distance; (iii) broader frequency band. There have been significant breakthroughs, applying fibre optic technologies to interrogate cables at very high precision over very large distances both on land and at sea, in boreholes and at the surface.
These developments overlap with considerable improvements in optical and atom interferometry for inertial rotation and gravity sensing which has led to a variety of improved sensor concepts over the last two decades.
We welcome contributions on theoretical advances and applications of novel sensing methodologies in seismology, geodesy, geophysics, natural hazards, oceanography, urban environment, geothermal investigations, etc. including laboratory studies, large-scale field tests and modelling.

We are happy to announce Nathaniel J. Lindsey as invited speaker.

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Co-organized by ERE6/NH4
Convener: Gilda Currenti | Co-conveners: David SollbergerECSECS, Philippe Jousset, Felix Bernauer, Shane Murphy, André Gebauer, Zack SpicaECSECS, Sneha SinghECSECS
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| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)

Recent advances in deformation sensing have led to new applications in various geophysical disciplines such as earthquake physics, broadband seismology, volcanology, seismic exploration, strong ground motion, earthquake engineering and geodesy.
New developments in translation, rotation and strain sensing enable the complete observation of seismic ground motion and deformation. Applications are manifold, ranging from the reduction of nonuniqueness in seismic inverse problems to the characterization, separation and reconstruction of the seismic wavefield.
Among others, fibre optic technologies is bound to become a standard tool for crustal exploration and seismic monitoring thanks to: (i) easier installation (low cost, simpler installation and maintenance, robustness in harsh environment); (ii) high spatial and temporal resolution over long distance; (iii) broader frequency band. There have been significant breakthroughs, applying fibre optic technologies to interrogate cables at very high precision over very large distances both on land and at sea, in boreholes and at the surface.
These developments overlap with considerable improvements in optical and atom interferometry for inertial rotation and gravity sensing which has led to a variety of improved sensor concepts over the last two decades.
We welcome contributions on theoretical advances and applications of novel sensing methodologies in seismology, geodesy, geophysics, natural hazards, oceanography, urban environment, geothermal investigations, etc. including laboratory studies, large-scale field tests and modelling.

We are happy to announce Nathaniel J. Lindsey as invited speaker.

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