GI1.3

This session is a result of a merge between GI1.3 and GM2.3:

Recent advances in image collection and topographic measurements are providing unprecedented insight into landscape and process characterization across the geosciences. In parallel, the increasing availability of digitised historical images, going back to the late 1800s, together with advances in digital photogrammetry software, have provided new opportunities for assessing and reconstructing long-term surface evolution from local to landscape scale. Such data can extend high-resolution time series into the pre-satellite era and offer exciting potential for distinguishing anthropogenic from natural causes of environmental change. For both historic and contemporary scenarios, augmenting classic techniques with digital imagery and ‘structure from motion’ (SfM) processing has democratized data access and offers a new measurement paradigm to geoscientists.

Such data are now available over spatial scales from millimetres to kilometres, and over durations of single events to lasting time series (e.g. from sub-second to century-duration time-lapse), allowing evaluation of event magnitude and frequency interrelationships. Despite a large volume of historical images available for reprocessing with modern methods, their full potential has not yet been widely exploited and uncertainties remain on the optimal types of information that can be extracted. Substantial opportunities are likely to be exposed by exploring such data resources with machine and deep learning approaches.

The session welcomes submissions from a broad range of geoscience disciplines such as geomorphology, cryosphere, volcanology, hydrology, bio-geosciences, and geology. Our goal is to create a diverse and interdisciplinary session to explore the potential of 2D and 3D image and topographic datasets for reconstructing and interpreting environments and processes, past and present. We aim to exchange experiences of modern photogrammetric and topographic measurement and modelling technologies, along with their associated data processing tools, to highlight their potentials, limitations, and challenges in different environments.

Public information:
We will have a video meeting on Friday evening starting from 6 pm CEST (UTC+2), in addition to the chat session on Friday morning, as scheduled. Authors will give talks in this video meeting, and there will be room for discussions, with the following agenda:

18:00 - 18:05 - Meeting setting and introduction to the session
18:05 - 18:17 - Amaury Dehecq, "Multidecadal elevation changes from spy satellite images: application to glaciers and landslides".
18:17 - 18:29 - Robert McNabb, "An open-source toolset for automated processing of historic spy photos: sPyMicMac".
18:29 - 18:41 - Penelope How, "PyTrx: a Python-based monoscopic terrestrial photogrammetry toolset for glaciology".
18.41 - 18:53 - Sebastian Flöry, "Development of a 3D Viewer for georeferencing and monoplotting of historical terrestrial images".
18.53 - 19:05 - Luca Carturan, "Use of WWI photos for quantitative reconstructions of glaciers along the Italian-Austrian front".
19:05 - 19:17 - Martino Terrone, "Coupling historical maps and Lidar data to recognize man-made landforms in urban areas".
19:17 - 19:25 - a little break
19:25 - 19:37 - William D. Harcourt. "Observing the cryosphere with millimetre wave radar: The case study of Rhône Glacier".
19.37 - 19:49 - Denis Feurer, "Time-SIFT: a frugal method for leveraging multi-temporal photogrammetric data without ancillary data"
19.49 - 20:01 - Helge Smebye, "Combined aerial and ground-based Structure-from-Motion modelling for a vertical rock wall face to estimate volume of failure"
20:01 - 20:13 - Sara Cucchiaro, "Terrestrial-Aerial-SfM and TLS data fusion for agricultural terrace surveys in complex topographic and land cover conditions".
20:13 - 20:25 - Andreas Mayr, "Close-range sensing and object based analysis of shallow landslides and erosion in grasslands".
20:25 - 20:37 - Kieran Wood, "UAS radiation hot-spot detection and refinement."
20:37 - break and discussion with an open end.

Join the video meeting using the following link:
https://kuei.zoom.us/j/99949141405

For an optimal audio and video experience, we suggest that you join the meeting using the Zoom application. When following the meeting link, you will be asked to install it. Alternatively, you may join the meeting using the Chrome browser.

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Co-organized by EOS9/CL2/CR2/GM2/HS13/NH6
Convener: Livia PiermatteiECSECS | Co-conveners: Penelope HowECSECS, Wilfried KarelECSECS, Anette EltnerECSECS, Andreas KaiserECSECS, Mike James, Mark SmithECSECS, Jack WilliamsECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)

This session is a result of a merge between GI1.3 and GM2.3:

Recent advances in image collection and topographic measurements are providing unprecedented insight into landscape and process characterization across the geosciences. In parallel, the increasing availability of digitised historical images, going back to the late 1800s, together with advances in digital photogrammetry software, have provided new opportunities for assessing and reconstructing long-term surface evolution from local to landscape scale. Such data can extend high-resolution time series into the pre-satellite era and offer exciting potential for distinguishing anthropogenic from natural causes of environmental change. For both historic and contemporary scenarios, augmenting classic techniques with digital imagery and ‘structure from motion’ (SfM) processing has democratized data access and offers a new measurement paradigm to geoscientists.

Such data are now available over spatial scales from millimetres to kilometres, and over durations of single events to lasting time series (e.g. from sub-second to century-duration time-lapse), allowing evaluation of event magnitude and frequency interrelationships. Despite a large volume of historical images available for reprocessing with modern methods, their full potential has not yet been widely exploited and uncertainties remain on the optimal types of information that can be extracted. Substantial opportunities are likely to be exposed by exploring such data resources with machine and deep learning approaches.

The session welcomes submissions from a broad range of geoscience disciplines such as geomorphology, cryosphere, volcanology, hydrology, bio-geosciences, and geology. Our goal is to create a diverse and interdisciplinary session to explore the potential of 2D and 3D image and topographic datasets for reconstructing and interpreting environments and processes, past and present. We aim to exchange experiences of modern photogrammetric and topographic measurement and modelling technologies, along with their associated data processing tools, to highlight their potentials, limitations, and challenges in different environments.

Public information: We will have a video meeting on Friday evening starting from 6 pm CEST (UTC+2), in addition to the chat session on Friday morning, as scheduled. Authors will give talks in this video meeting, and there will be room for discussions, with the following agenda:

18:00 - 18:05 - Meeting setting and introduction to the session
18:05 - 18:17 - Amaury Dehecq, "Multidecadal elevation changes from spy satellite images: application to glaciers and landslides".
18:17 - 18:29 - Robert McNabb, "An open-source toolset for automated processing of historic spy photos: sPyMicMac".
18:29 - 18:41 - Penelope How, "PyTrx: a Python-based monoscopic terrestrial photogrammetry toolset for glaciology".
18.41 - 18:53 - Sebastian Flöry, "Development of a 3D Viewer for georeferencing and monoplotting of historical terrestrial images".
18.53 - 19:05 - Luca Carturan, "Use of WWI photos for quantitative reconstructions of glaciers along the Italian-Austrian front".
19:05 - 19:17 - Martino Terrone, "Coupling historical maps and Lidar data to recognize man-made landforms in urban areas".
19:17 - 19:25 - a little break
19:25 - 19:37 - William D. Harcourt. "Observing the cryosphere with millimetre wave radar: The case study of Rhône Glacier".
19.37 - 19:49 - Denis Feurer, "Time-SIFT: a frugal method for leveraging multi-temporal photogrammetric data without ancillary data"
19.49 - 20:01 - Helge Smebye, "Combined aerial and ground-based Structure-from-Motion modelling for a vertical rock wall face to estimate volume of failure"
20:01 - 20:13 - Sara Cucchiaro, "Terrestrial-Aerial-SfM and TLS data fusion for agricultural terrace surveys in complex topographic and land cover conditions".
20:13 - 20:25 - Andreas Mayr, "Close-range sensing and object based analysis of shallow landslides and erosion in grasslands".
20:25 - 20:37 - Kieran Wood, "UAS radiation hot-spot detection and refinement."
20:37 - break and discussion with an open end.

Join the video meeting using the following link:
https://kuei.zoom.us/j/99949141405

For an optimal audio and video experience, we suggest that you join the meeting using the Zoom application. When following the meeting link, you will be asked to install it. Alternatively, you may join the meeting using the Chrome browser.

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