GI2.8

The session gathers geoscientific aspects such as dynamics, reactions, and environmental/health consequences of radioactive materials that are massively released accidentally (e.g., Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear power plant accidents, wide fires, etc.) and by other human activities (e.g., nuclear tests).

The radioactive materials are known as polluting materials that are hazardous for human society, but are also ideal markers in understanding dynamics and physical/chemical/biological reactions chains in the environment. Thus, the radioactive contamination problem is multi-disciplinary. In fact, this topic involves regional and global transport and local reactions of radioactive materials through atmosphere, soil and water system, ocean, and organic and ecosystem, and its relation with human and non-human biota. The topic also involves hazard prediction and nowcast technology.

By combining 34 years (> halftime of Cesium 137) monitoring data after the Chernobyl Accident in 1986, 9 years dense measurement data by the most advanced instrumentation after the Fukushima Accident in 2011, and other events, we can improve our knowledgebase on the environmental behavior of radioactive materials and its environmental/biological impact. This should lead to improved monitoring systems in the future including emergency response systems, acute sampling/measurement methodology, and remediation schemes for any future nuclear accidents.

The following specific topics have traditionally been discussed:
(a) Atmospheric Science (emissions, transport, deposition, pollution);
(b) Hydrology (transport in surface and ground water system, soil-water interactions);
(c) Oceanology (transport, bio-system interaction);
(d) Soil System (transport, chemical interaction, transfer to organic system);
(e) Forestry;
(f) Natural Hazards (warning systems, health risk assessments, geophysical variability, countermeasure);
(g) Measurement Techniques (instrumentation, multipoint data measurements);
(h) Ecosystems (migration/decay of radionuclides).

The session consists of updated observations, new theoretical developments including simulations, and improved methods or tools which could improve observation and prediction capabilities during eventual future nuclear emergencies. New evaluations of existing tools, past nuclear contamination events and other data sets also welcome.

Public information:
Here is instruction of a live chat,
(1) Convener’s summary at the beginning of Chat 10:45-11:00
(2) We then go each presentation for 5 minutes including discussion.
(3) Each presenter posts their own "a few sentence summary within 80 words" in total, and the discussion. Omit any greeting to save time.
(4) To save time, we even offer to post your summary when we introduce your talk if you send me before hand
Live chat schedule
10:45        Convener summary
— we present one highlight slide from each presentation and give audience to search for presentation to deeply look into.
11:00    10066    Mykola Talerko et al
11:05    15257    Joffrey Dumont Le Brazidec et al
11:10    233    Sheng Fang et al
11:15    5844    Elena Korobova et al
11:20    2252    Misa Yasumiishi et al
11:25    13220    Yuichi Onda et al (solicited/Highlights)
11:30    13965    Fumiaki Makino et al
11:35    12301    Michio Aoyama et al
11:40    22136    Yasuhito Igarashi et al
11:45    12465    Hikaru Iida et al
11:50    19250    Mark Zheleznyak et al
11:55    12477    Yoshifumi Wakiyama et al
12:00    3175    Michio Aoyama et al (solicited)
12:05    11813    Yayoi Inomata and Michio Aoyama
12:10    12627    Daisuke Tsumune et al
12:15    21319    Susumu Yamada (Masahiko Machida) et al
12:20    6987    Hikaru Miura et al
12:25        Closing remark

The session gathers geoscientific aspects such as dynamics, reactions, and environmental/health consequences of radioactive materials that are massively released accidentally (e.g., Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear power plant accidents, wide fires, etc.) and by other human activities (e.g., nuclear tests).

In addition to hazardous aspect for human society, the radioactive materials are used as ideal markers in understanding dynamics and physical/chemical/biological reactions chains in the environment. This multi-disciplinary session gathers all these aspect.

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Co-organized by AS4/BG1/ERE4/GM12/NH9
Convener: Daisuke Tsumune | Co-conveners: Nikolaos Evangeliou, Yasunori IgarashiECSECS, Liudmila KolmykovaECSECS, Masatoshi Yamauchi
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)

The session gathers geoscientific aspects such as dynamics, reactions, and environmental/health consequences of radioactive materials that are massively released accidentally (e.g., Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear power plant accidents, wide fires, etc.) and by other human activities (e.g., nuclear tests).

The radioactive materials are known as polluting materials that are hazardous for human society, but are also ideal markers in understanding dynamics and physical/chemical/biological reactions chains in the environment. Thus, the radioactive contamination problem is multi-disciplinary. In fact, this topic involves regional and global transport and local reactions of radioactive materials through atmosphere, soil and water system, ocean, and organic and ecosystem, and its relation with human and non-human biota. The topic also involves hazard prediction and nowcast technology.

By combining 34 years (> halftime of Cesium 137) monitoring data after the Chernobyl Accident in 1986, 9 years dense measurement data by the most advanced instrumentation after the Fukushima Accident in 2011, and other events, we can improve our knowledgebase on the environmental behavior of radioactive materials and its environmental/biological impact. This should lead to improved monitoring systems in the future including emergency response systems, acute sampling/measurement methodology, and remediation schemes for any future nuclear accidents.

The following specific topics have traditionally been discussed:
(a) Atmospheric Science (emissions, transport, deposition, pollution);
(b) Hydrology (transport in surface and ground water system, soil-water interactions);
(c) Oceanology (transport, bio-system interaction);
(d) Soil System (transport, chemical interaction, transfer to organic system);
(e) Forestry;
(f) Natural Hazards (warning systems, health risk assessments, geophysical variability, countermeasure);
(g) Measurement Techniques (instrumentation, multipoint data measurements);
(h) Ecosystems (migration/decay of radionuclides).

The session consists of updated observations, new theoretical developments including simulations, and improved methods or tools which could improve observation and prediction capabilities during eventual future nuclear emergencies. New evaluations of existing tools, past nuclear contamination events and other data sets also welcome.

Public information: Here is instruction of a live chat,
(1) Convener’s summary at the beginning of Chat 10:45-11:00
(2) We then go each presentation for 5 minutes including discussion.
(3) Each presenter posts their own "a few sentence summary within 80 words" in total, and the discussion. Omit any greeting to save time.
(4) To save time, we even offer to post your summary when we introduce your talk if you send me before hand
Live chat schedule
10:45        Convener summary
— we present one highlight slide from each presentation and give audience to search for presentation to deeply look into.
11:00    10066    Mykola Talerko et al
11:05    15257    Joffrey Dumont Le Brazidec et al
11:10    233    Sheng Fang et al
11:15    5844    Elena Korobova et al
11:20    2252    Misa Yasumiishi et al
11:25    13220    Yuichi Onda et al (solicited/Highlights)
11:30    13965    Fumiaki Makino et al
11:35    12301    Michio Aoyama et al
11:40    22136    Yasuhito Igarashi et al
11:45    12465    Hikaru Iida et al
11:50    19250    Mark Zheleznyak et al
11:55    12477    Yoshifumi Wakiyama et al
12:00    3175    Michio Aoyama et al (solicited)
12:05    11813    Yayoi Inomata and Michio Aoyama
12:10    12627    Daisuke Tsumune et al
12:15    21319    Susumu Yamada (Masahiko Machida) et al
12:20    6987    Hikaru Miura et al
12:25        Closing remark

The session gathers geoscientific aspects such as dynamics, reactions, and environmental/health consequences of radioactive materials that are massively released accidentally (e.g., Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear power plant accidents, wide fires, etc.) and by other human activities (e.g., nuclear tests).

In addition to hazardous aspect for human society, the radioactive materials are used as ideal markers in understanding dynamics and physical/chemical/biological reactions chains in the environment. This multi-disciplinary session gathers all these aspect.

Session assets

Session materials Session summary Download all presentations (62MB)