HS2.4.5

The response of catchments to climatic sequences is strongly dependent on events that have affected the catchment in the past. Through water and solutes storage in aquifers, soils, snow/ice, lakes and man-made reservoirs, catchments hold a long-term memory, which significantly affects the variability of their response in time across multiple spatial and temporal scales. A proper assessment of this memory and its variability among catchments is a necessary condition to (i) understanding and predicting the potential impact of environmental changes and (ii) better managing and operating water resources systems.

This session invites contributions on: (1) new approaches to assess the memory of catchments; (2) methods and case studies identifying controls on the residence time of water and solutes in contrasting landscapes; (3) methods and case studies assessing the impact of land use change on catchment response; (4) methods and case studies exploiting historic climate variability to extract catchment-scale memory indices; (5) methods and case studies exploiting catchment memory to improve hydrological modelling and prediction, (6) case studies on flood-rich/drought-rich and flood-poor/drought-poor sequences, (7) regionalization studies on one of the above topics and (8) methods and case studies in which the long-term catchment memory is captured in order to improve the performance of water resources systems (river basins, multipurpose multireservoir systems, etc.).

Note that from the point of view of the 23 Unsolved Problems in Hydrology initiative (https://doi.org/10.1080/02626667.2019.1620507), this session will contribute to addressing four problems: n°6 (What are the hydrologic laws at the catchment scale and how do they change with scale?), n°8 (Why do streams respond so quickly to precipitation inputs when storm flow is so old, and what is the transit time distribution of water in the terrestrial water cycle?), n°9 (How do flood-rich and drought-rich periods arise, are they changing, and if so why?) and n° 22 (What are the synergies and tradeoffs between societal goals related to water management (e.g. water–environment–energy–food–health)?).

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Co-sponsored by IAHS
Convener: Vazken Andréassian | Co-conveners: Berit Arheimer, Alban de Lavenne, Markus Hrachowitz, Amaury Tilmant
The response of catchments to climatic sequences is strongly dependent on events that have affected the catchment in the past. Through water and solutes storage in aquifers, soils, snow/ice, lakes and man-made reservoirs, catchments hold a long-term memory, which significantly affects the variability of their response in time across multiple spatial and temporal scales. A proper assessment of this memory and its variability among catchments is a necessary condition to (i) understanding and predicting the potential impact of environmental changes and (ii) better managing and operating water resources systems.

This session invites contributions on: (1) new approaches to assess the memory of catchments; (2) methods and case studies identifying controls on the residence time of water and solutes in contrasting landscapes; (3) methods and case studies assessing the impact of land use change on catchment response; (4) methods and case studies exploiting historic climate variability to extract catchment-scale memory indices; (5) methods and case studies exploiting catchment memory to improve hydrological modelling and prediction, (6) case studies on flood-rich/drought-rich and flood-poor/drought-poor sequences, (7) regionalization studies on one of the above topics and (8) methods and case studies in which the long-term catchment memory is captured in order to improve the performance of water resources systems (river basins, multipurpose multireservoir systems, etc.).

Note that from the point of view of the 23 Unsolved Problems in Hydrology initiative (https://doi.org/10.1080/02626667.2019.1620507), this session will contribute to addressing four problems: n°6 (What are the hydrologic laws at the catchment scale and how do they change with scale?), n°8 (Why do streams respond so quickly to precipitation inputs when storm flow is so old, and what is the transit time distribution of water in the terrestrial water cycle?), n°9 (How do flood-rich and drought-rich periods arise, are they changing, and if so why?) and n° 22 (What are the synergies and tradeoffs between societal goals related to water management (e.g. water–environment–energy–food–health)?).