TS5.1

Seismic activity and crustal deformation are indicative of underlying plate tectonic and/or volcanic processes. Their connectedness is often non-linear and non-sequential. Seismic activity can result in crustal deformation in a tectonically or volcanically active region, while deformation arising from these forces can harness seismic potency. In isolation, seismic and geodetic (GNSS, InSAR) analysis potentially run the risk of delivering partial inferences, especially in compound geodynamic settings. Evidently, independently obtained results from seismic and geodetic observations are heavily reliant on the data type, methodology, model assumptions, and error estimations. In recent times, there have been several measures to jointly employ seismic and geodetic data to understand complex processes in aforementioned settings. Such studies have made significant contributions to modern and reliable data analysis practices. Therefore, this session aims to explore ongoing research that works towards arriving at comprehensive results from both ends of the spectrum; seismicity, a form of fast deformation, and its relationship with the slower geodetically measured deformation.

The current session invites presentation of research that simultaneously incorporates seismic and geodetic (GNSS, InSAR) techniques to investigate any given tectonic and/or volcanic setting. The study may include analyses of selected earthquakes and related deformation, comparison studies between seismic and geodetic data analysis, volcanic deformation and associated seismicity, and seismic cycle monitoring based on both seismology and geodesy. We also encourage studies using models (analytical or numerical) linking geodetic and seismic research, such as stress-strain models in volcanic and tectonic areas.

Invited Abstract:
Using Seismic and Geodetic Observations in a Simultaneous Kinematic Model of the 2019 Ridgecrest, California Earthquakes
Dara Goldberg1, Diego Melgar1, Valerie Sahakian1, Amanda Thomas1, Xiaohua Xu2, Brendan Crowell3, and Jianghui Geng4
1Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon, United States of America
2Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States of America
3Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America
4Wuhan University, Wuhan, China

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Co-organized by G3/SM1
Convener: Revathy M. ParameswaranECSECS | Co-conveners: Cécile DucrocqECSECS, Siqi LiECSECS
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| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)

Seismic activity and crustal deformation are indicative of underlying plate tectonic and/or volcanic processes. Their connectedness is often non-linear and non-sequential. Seismic activity can result in crustal deformation in a tectonically or volcanically active region, while deformation arising from these forces can harness seismic potency. In isolation, seismic and geodetic (GNSS, InSAR) analysis potentially run the risk of delivering partial inferences, especially in compound geodynamic settings. Evidently, independently obtained results from seismic and geodetic observations are heavily reliant on the data type, methodology, model assumptions, and error estimations. In recent times, there have been several measures to jointly employ seismic and geodetic data to understand complex processes in aforementioned settings. Such studies have made significant contributions to modern and reliable data analysis practices. Therefore, this session aims to explore ongoing research that works towards arriving at comprehensive results from both ends of the spectrum; seismicity, a form of fast deformation, and its relationship with the slower geodetically measured deformation.

The current session invites presentation of research that simultaneously incorporates seismic and geodetic (GNSS, InSAR) techniques to investigate any given tectonic and/or volcanic setting. The study may include analyses of selected earthquakes and related deformation, comparison studies between seismic and geodetic data analysis, volcanic deformation and associated seismicity, and seismic cycle monitoring based on both seismology and geodesy. We also encourage studies using models (analytical or numerical) linking geodetic and seismic research, such as stress-strain models in volcanic and tectonic areas.

Invited Abstract:
Using Seismic and Geodetic Observations in a Simultaneous Kinematic Model of the 2019 Ridgecrest, California Earthquakes
Dara Goldberg1, Diego Melgar1, Valerie Sahakian1, Amanda Thomas1, Xiaohua Xu2, Brendan Crowell3, and Jianghui Geng4
1Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon, United States of America
2Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States of America
3Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America
4Wuhan University, Wuhan, China

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