CL5.4

The number of past climatic and/or ecological data generated from a range of distinct proxies and natural archives is continuously growing. Hence, significant advances in palaeoclimate research can now be made using large-scale compilations. Funding agencies are increasingly requesting projects to align with the FAIR Data Principles to make their data Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable and large-scale open-access compilations are one way to abide by this. Specific needs for establishing such large-scale databases are 1) comprehensive and meticulous database management and 2) the development of novel approaches to unlock their full potential (i.e., to reveal supra-regional and global spatial and temporal patterns in palaeoclimate conditions that are not possible with single records). Amongst others, the main challenges relate to getting access to data not already publicly available, the quality of the records, and data stewardship. This implies that a considerable effort must be spent in identifying records and in formulating/implementing comprehensive workflows for community-based quality checking. In addition, transparent and efficient communication is critical.

This session aims at presenting current advances in palaeoclimate and palaeoecology based on local- to global-scale syntheses. Bringing together palaeoclimate databases with observational and/or climate modelling outputs is crucial for improving our understanding of past climate conditions, to identify signal and noise components and their temporal dynamics, and to gain insight into the quality of data-model comparisons. We therefore aim at bridging the gap between data generation, earth system modeling and data assimilation studies.

We encourage submissions on data compilations, cross-comparison and modelling studies utilizing data repositories and databases (e.g., NEOTOMA, SISAL, PAGES2k, ACER, EPD), including, but not limited to:
- Comparative studies using one or several archives (e.g., including tests of temporal and spatial synchronicity of past regional to global climate changes)
- Data-Model comparisons (including isotope enabled models, proxy system models or local calibration studies)
- Integrative multi-proxy/multi-archive approaches
- Large scale age model comparisons and record quality assessment studies, including methods aimed at cross-validation between different records and variable spatial and temporal scales.

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Co-sponsored by PAGES
Convener: Nikita KaushalECSECS | Co-conveners: Laia Comas-BruECSECS, Franziska LechleitnerECSECS, Sophie WarkenECSECS
The number of past climatic and/or ecological data generated from a range of distinct proxies and natural archives is continuously growing. Hence, significant advances in palaeoclimate research can now be made using large-scale compilations. Funding agencies are increasingly requesting projects to align with the FAIR Data Principles to make their data Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable and large-scale open-access compilations are one way to abide by this. Specific needs for establishing such large-scale databases are 1) comprehensive and meticulous database management and 2) the development of novel approaches to unlock their full potential (i.e., to reveal supra-regional and global spatial and temporal patterns in palaeoclimate conditions that are not possible with single records). Amongst others, the main challenges relate to getting access to data not already publicly available, the quality of the records, and data stewardship. This implies that a considerable effort must be spent in identifying records and in formulating/implementing comprehensive workflows for community-based quality checking. In addition, transparent and efficient communication is critical.

This session aims at presenting current advances in palaeoclimate and palaeoecology based on local- to global-scale syntheses. Bringing together palaeoclimate databases with observational and/or climate modelling outputs is crucial for improving our understanding of past climate conditions, to identify signal and noise components and their temporal dynamics, and to gain insight into the quality of data-model comparisons. We therefore aim at bridging the gap between data generation, earth system modeling and data assimilation studies.

We encourage submissions on data compilations, cross-comparison and modelling studies utilizing data repositories and databases (e.g., NEOTOMA, SISAL, PAGES2k, ACER, EPD), including, but not limited to:
- Comparative studies using one or several archives (e.g., including tests of temporal and spatial synchronicity of past regional to global climate changes)
- Data-Model comparisons (including isotope enabled models, proxy system models or local calibration studies)
- Integrative multi-proxy/multi-archive approaches
- Large scale age model comparisons and record quality assessment studies, including methods aimed at cross-validation between different records and variable spatial and temporal scales.