CL1.8

Orbital forcing is the most important known external driver of the climate system. Nevertheless, resultant internal climate feedbacks that invoke different climate components across different time scales play a critical role in defining the climate response to orbital forcing. These internal climate feedbacks are particularly apparent at past climate transitions, which cannot be simply explained by orbital changes alone (e.g. glacial inception and termination, the mid-Brunhes transition, the mid-Pleistocene transition, Pliocene-Pleistocene transition).

In this interdisciplinary session, we aim to bring together studies of centennial-to-orbital scale interactions among the atmosphere-ocean system, cryosphere, and carbon cycle that advance our understanding of the climate system during climate transitions. Modeling, theoretical and proxy-based studies as well as novel methodologies that combine the above approaches are especially encouraged.

Keynote talk "Ocean carbon storage and release over a glacial cycle" by Dr. James Rae, School of Earth & Environmental Sciences, University of St Andrews

Public information:
In this session, online displays will be present mainly by live talks in “GoToMeeting” room (similar as Zoom). Since some of authors cannot join in online video chat room, the conveners will try to make essential information accessible in the text-based chat room. In addition, we will eventually move to the chat room after the talks in “GoToMeeting” room. Here is the room information:
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EGU2020 online session CL1.8
Fri, May 8, 2020 1:55 PM - 3:45 PM (CEST)

Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/880800221

You can also dial in using your phone.
Germany: +49 892 0194 301

Access Code: 880-800-221

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Co-organized by SSP2
Convener: Xu ZhangECSECS | Co-conveners: Jesse FarmerECSECS, Gregor Knorr, Matteo WilleitECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)

Orbital forcing is the most important known external driver of the climate system. Nevertheless, resultant internal climate feedbacks that invoke different climate components across different time scales play a critical role in defining the climate response to orbital forcing. These internal climate feedbacks are particularly apparent at past climate transitions, which cannot be simply explained by orbital changes alone (e.g. glacial inception and termination, the mid-Brunhes transition, the mid-Pleistocene transition, Pliocene-Pleistocene transition).

In this interdisciplinary session, we aim to bring together studies of centennial-to-orbital scale interactions among the atmosphere-ocean system, cryosphere, and carbon cycle that advance our understanding of the climate system during climate transitions. Modeling, theoretical and proxy-based studies as well as novel methodologies that combine the above approaches are especially encouraged.

Keynote talk "Ocean carbon storage and release over a glacial cycle" by Dr. James Rae, School of Earth & Environmental Sciences, University of St Andrews

Public information: In this session, online displays will be present mainly by live talks in “GoToMeeting” room (similar as Zoom). Since some of authors cannot join in online video chat room, the conveners will try to make essential information accessible in the text-based chat room. In addition, we will eventually move to the chat room after the talks in “GoToMeeting” room. Here is the room information:
----------------------------------------------------
EGU2020 online session CL1.8
Fri, May 8, 2020 1:55 PM - 3:45 PM (CEST)

Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/880800221

You can also dial in using your phone.
Germany: +49 892 0194 301

Access Code: 880-800-221

Session assets

Session materials Download all presentations (44MB)