AS4.6

The atmospheric water cycle is a key component of the climate system, and links across many scientific disciplines. Processes interact with dynamics at different scales throughout the atmospheric life cycle of water vapour from evaporation to precipitation. This session sets the focus on understanding the interaction between processes, their dynamics and characteristics of the water cycle, covering the entire atmospheric life cycle from evaporation, atmospheric moisture transport, to precipitation processes as observed from in-situ and remote sensing instrumentation, recorded by (paleo)climate archives, and as simulated by models for past, present and future climates.

We invite studies

* focusing on the understanding and impacts of features of the atmospheric water cycle related to weather systems, such as Atmospheric Rivers, Cold-Air Outbreaks, Warm Conveyor Belts, Tropical Moisture Exports, and the global Monsoon systems;

* investigating the large-scale drivers behind the variability and trends within the atmospheric water cycle, from long-term observations, reanalysis data, or regional to global model simulations;

* involving and connecting field campaigns (YOPP, MOZAiC, NAWDEX) with forecast and reanalysis data, indicators of past hydroclimate from climate proxies such as ice cores and stalagmites, and model predictions of the future evolution of the atmospheric water cycle;

* applying methods such as stable isotopes as physical tracers in the water cycle, tagged water tracers, and Lagrangian moisture source diagnostics to identify source-sink relationships and to evaluate model simulations of the water cycle;

* describing the global and regional state of the atmospheric water cycle with characteristics such as the recycling ratio, life time of water vapour, and moisture transport properties.

We particularly encourage contributions to link across neighbouring disciplines, such as atmospheric science, climate, paleoclimate, glaciology, and hydrology.

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Co-organized by CL2/HS13
Convener: Harald Sodemann | Co-conveners: Marie-Estelle DemoryECSECS, Irina V. Gorodetskaya, David Lavers, Alexandre M. RamosECSECS
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| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)

The atmospheric water cycle is a key component of the climate system, and links across many scientific disciplines. Processes interact with dynamics at different scales throughout the atmospheric life cycle of water vapour from evaporation to precipitation. This session sets the focus on understanding the interaction between processes, their dynamics and characteristics of the water cycle, covering the entire atmospheric life cycle from evaporation, atmospheric moisture transport, to precipitation processes as observed from in-situ and remote sensing instrumentation, recorded by (paleo)climate archives, and as simulated by models for past, present and future climates.

We invite studies

* focusing on the understanding and impacts of features of the atmospheric water cycle related to weather systems, such as Atmospheric Rivers, Cold-Air Outbreaks, Warm Conveyor Belts, Tropical Moisture Exports, and the global Monsoon systems;

* investigating the large-scale drivers behind the variability and trends within the atmospheric water cycle, from long-term observations, reanalysis data, or regional to global model simulations;

* involving and connecting field campaigns (YOPP, MOZAiC, NAWDEX) with forecast and reanalysis data, indicators of past hydroclimate from climate proxies such as ice cores and stalagmites, and model predictions of the future evolution of the atmospheric water cycle;

* applying methods such as stable isotopes as physical tracers in the water cycle, tagged water tracers, and Lagrangian moisture source diagnostics to identify source-sink relationships and to evaluate model simulations of the water cycle;

* describing the global and regional state of the atmospheric water cycle with characteristics such as the recycling ratio, life time of water vapour, and moisture transport properties.

We particularly encourage contributions to link across neighbouring disciplines, such as atmospheric science, climate, paleoclimate, glaciology, and hydrology.

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