AS3.7

A better understanding of the role of natural aerosols in the atmosphere is essential for assessing anthropogenic radiative forcing and the climate response. Our session explores primary aerosols and those formed from precursor gases emitted by natural sources, e.g. from wildfires, deserts, volcanoes and both the marine and terrestrial biosphere. The session intends to bring together experts from different fields to assess the state-of-the-science knowledge on natural aerosols and to identify future directions to reduce uncertainty. We encourage submissions that use models across different spatial scales and consider past, present or future perspectives, as well as measurements from remote sensing, field campaigns and laboratory experiments. Questions of particular interest are, but are not limited to: How can we distinguish between truly natural aerosols and those whose emissions or formation are influenced by anthropogenic activities? How have the contributions of natural aerosols to atmospheric composition and deposition changed over time? What are the consequences of these changes? Where are the missing links in our understanding of the lifecycle of natural aerosols in the atmosphere in the absence of anthropogenic influence? Can we identify any pristine environments in the present day that can help us understand the pre-industrial atmosphere?

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Co-organized by CL3
Convener: Stephanie Fiedler | Co-conveners: Hugh Coe, Douglas Hamilton, Kerstin Schepanski, Catherine Scott
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| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)

A better understanding of the role of natural aerosols in the atmosphere is essential for assessing anthropogenic radiative forcing and the climate response. Our session explores primary aerosols and those formed from precursor gases emitted by natural sources, e.g. from wildfires, deserts, volcanoes and both the marine and terrestrial biosphere. The session intends to bring together experts from different fields to assess the state-of-the-science knowledge on natural aerosols and to identify future directions to reduce uncertainty. We encourage submissions that use models across different spatial scales and consider past, present or future perspectives, as well as measurements from remote sensing, field campaigns and laboratory experiments. Questions of particular interest are, but are not limited to: How can we distinguish between truly natural aerosols and those whose emissions or formation are influenced by anthropogenic activities? How have the contributions of natural aerosols to atmospheric composition and deposition changed over time? What are the consequences of these changes? Where are the missing links in our understanding of the lifecycle of natural aerosols in the atmosphere in the absence of anthropogenic influence? Can we identify any pristine environments in the present day that can help us understand the pre-industrial atmosphere?

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