AS3.15

Significant uncertainties exist in our understanding of the CO2 and CH4 fluxes between land or ocean and atmosphere on regional and global scales. Remotely-sensed CO2 and CH4 observations provide a significant potential for improving our understanding of the natural carbon cycle and for the monitoring of anthropogenic emissions. Over the last few years, remote sensing technologies for measuring CO2 and CH4 from space, aircraft, and from the ground made great advances and new passive and active instruments from different platforms became available offering unprecedented accuracy and coverage.

This session is open to contributions related to all aspects of remote sensing of the greenhouse gases CO2 and CH4 from current, upcoming and planned satellite missions (e.g., OCO-3, GOSAT-2, Sentinel 5P, CO2M), as well as ground-based (e.g., TCCON, COCCON), aircraft, other remote sensing instruments. This includes, e.g., advances in retrieval techniques, instrumental concepts, and validation activities, but we specifically encourage contributions that focus on the interpretation of observations in respect to natural fluxes or anthropogenic emissions.

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Convener: Sander Houweling | Co-conveners: Hartmut Boesch, Dietrich G. Feist, Justus Notholt, Maximilian Reuter
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| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)

Significant uncertainties exist in our understanding of the CO2 and CH4 fluxes between land or ocean and atmosphere on regional and global scales. Remotely-sensed CO2 and CH4 observations provide a significant potential for improving our understanding of the natural carbon cycle and for the monitoring of anthropogenic emissions. Over the last few years, remote sensing technologies for measuring CO2 and CH4 from space, aircraft, and from the ground made great advances and new passive and active instruments from different platforms became available offering unprecedented accuracy and coverage.

This session is open to contributions related to all aspects of remote sensing of the greenhouse gases CO2 and CH4 from current, upcoming and planned satellite missions (e.g., OCO-3, GOSAT-2, Sentinel 5P, CO2M), as well as ground-based (e.g., TCCON, COCCON), aircraft, other remote sensing instruments. This includes, e.g., advances in retrieval techniques, instrumental concepts, and validation activities, but we specifically encourage contributions that focus on the interpretation of observations in respect to natural fluxes or anthropogenic emissions.

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