GM7.2

Mountain glaciations provide an invaluable record for past and present climate change. The utilization of this potential is, however, not trivial because of the wide diversity of formerly and currently glaciated mountain ranges. In addition to their dynamic, complex, and interacting geomorphological process-systems, the specific different climatic and glaciological conditions make any subsequent global or intra-hemispheric correlations incredibly challenging. This problem is further enhanced by ongoing specialisation within the scientific community. Working groups primarily focusing on either individual aspects or selected mountain regions often remain somewhat disconnected. Only if significant bridging between specialised research communities is guaranteed, progress with the understanding of the complex interactions within mountain ranges can be achieved.
The primary aim of this session is to evaluate the potential of mountain glaciations records and stimulate further research in this important field of research. Contributions on all relevant aspects of the topic are welcomed, for example: (a) glacial landforms and reconstruction of past glaciers, (b) dating techniques and geochronology compilations, (c) glacier dynamics and palaeoclimatic interpretations, or (d) impacts of ecosystems and human evolution/society. Submissions targeting these connections are specifically encouraged. While we encourage submitting abstracts from all abovementioned topics within the broad field of mountain glaciations, we would like to invite in particular those highlighting the specific conditions of mountain glaciations or addressing the relationship and connections between different of their aspects. To address the diversity of mountain glaciations, contributions from high-, middle-, and low-latitude mountain ranges as well as from continental to maritime regions are all welcomed. The time scale of the session will cover the whole time range from Early Pleistocene glaciations to the LGM and Holocene/modern glaciers.

Solicited talk: Ann Rowan "Accelerating recent mass loss from debris-covered Khumbu Glacier in Nepal, and projected response to climate change by 2200 CE"

The session is a platform for everyone interested in the emerging collaborative research network “The Legacy of Mountain Glaciations” and a related splinter meeting (SMP 1) is scheduled for Wednesday, May 6th at 12.45 in room: 0.51. Please use this opportunity to meet and exchange ideas and expertise.

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Co-organized by CR4/SSP2
Convener: Stefan Winkler | Co-conveners: Lauren KnightECSECS, Giovanni Monegato, Jürgen Reitner
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| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)

Mountain glaciations provide an invaluable record for past and present climate change. The utilization of this potential is, however, not trivial because of the wide diversity of formerly and currently glaciated mountain ranges. In addition to their dynamic, complex, and interacting geomorphological process-systems, the specific different climatic and glaciological conditions make any subsequent global or intra-hemispheric correlations incredibly challenging. This problem is further enhanced by ongoing specialisation within the scientific community. Working groups primarily focusing on either individual aspects or selected mountain regions often remain somewhat disconnected. Only if significant bridging between specialised research communities is guaranteed, progress with the understanding of the complex interactions within mountain ranges can be achieved.
The primary aim of this session is to evaluate the potential of mountain glaciations records and stimulate further research in this important field of research. Contributions on all relevant aspects of the topic are welcomed, for example: (a) glacial landforms and reconstruction of past glaciers, (b) dating techniques and geochronology compilations, (c) glacier dynamics and palaeoclimatic interpretations, or (d) impacts of ecosystems and human evolution/society. Submissions targeting these connections are specifically encouraged. While we encourage submitting abstracts from all abovementioned topics within the broad field of mountain glaciations, we would like to invite in particular those highlighting the specific conditions of mountain glaciations or addressing the relationship and connections between different of their aspects. To address the diversity of mountain glaciations, contributions from high-, middle-, and low-latitude mountain ranges as well as from continental to maritime regions are all welcomed. The time scale of the session will cover the whole time range from Early Pleistocene glaciations to the LGM and Holocene/modern glaciers.

Solicited talk: Ann Rowan "Accelerating recent mass loss from debris-covered Khumbu Glacier in Nepal, and projected response to climate change by 2200 CE"

The session is a platform for everyone interested in the emerging collaborative research network “The Legacy of Mountain Glaciations” and a related splinter meeting (SMP 1) is scheduled for Wednesday, May 6th at 12.45 in room: 0.51. Please use this opportunity to meet and exchange ideas and expertise.

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