GM1.1

In the past years, it has become apparent that human activities are increasingly affecting the surface of the Earth. Extreme meteorological events are becoming the new norm, and changes in the climatic drivers of Earth surface processes are pushing the study of geomorphology towards new frontiers. Since several millennia, human activities are causing large changes in ecosystems, land use, hydrological routing, and direct anthropogenic modification of the landscape by construction. These changes impact systems across the full spectrum of geomorphology. A key challenge in the coming years is to translate our understanding of geomorphic processes, which is often based on observations of past or current conditions, into the rapidly changing future.
This session will bring together a series of invited speakers to provide insights and perspectives in this topic from across the field of geomorphology.

Share:
Convener: Kristen Cook | Co-conveners: Annegret LarsenECSECS, Giulia Sofia, Matteo Spagnolo, Andrea Zerboni
Displays
| Wed, 06 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)

In the past years, it has become apparent that human activities are increasingly affecting the surface of the Earth. Extreme meteorological events are becoming the new norm, and changes in the climatic drivers of Earth surface processes are pushing the study of geomorphology towards new frontiers. Since several millennia, human activities are causing large changes in ecosystems, land use, hydrological routing, and direct anthropogenic modification of the landscape by construction. These changes impact systems across the full spectrum of geomorphology. A key challenge in the coming years is to translate our understanding of geomorphic processes, which is often based on observations of past or current conditions, into the rapidly changing future.
This session will bring together a series of invited speakers to provide insights and perspectives in this topic from across the field of geomorphology.

Files for download

Download all presentations (30MB)