GM2.5

Geochronological frameworks are essential for the study of landscape evolution. Over the last decades, geochronological techniques such as cosmogenic nuclides, thermochronology, radiocarbon and luminescence dating have improved in accuracy, precision, and temporal range. Recently, the development of new approaches, new isotopic/mineral systems and the opportunity to combine these techniques are expanding their range of applications. This session explores these advances and novel applications. These include studies of erosional rates and processes, sediment provenance, burial and transport times, bedrock exposure or cooling histories, landscape dynamics, and the examination of potential biases and discordances in geochronological data. We appreciate contributions that use dating tools which are established or in development, particularly those that quantify geomorphological processes with novel approaches and/or generic implications. We encourage studies that combine different techniques (e.g., CRN, luminescence, thermochronology, etc.) or data sets (e.g., field, remote sensing, numerical modelling), and/or highlight the latest developments and open questions in the application of geochronometers to landscape evolution questions.

Solicited presenter: Nathan Brown - UC Berkeley (USA)

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Co-organized by CL5
Convener: Stefanie TofeldeECSECS | Co-conveners: Georgina King, Sebastian Kreutzer, Duna Roda-BoludaECSECS, Renee van DongenECSECS
Geochronological frameworks are essential for the study of landscape evolution. Over the last decades, geochronological techniques such as cosmogenic nuclides, thermochronology, radiocarbon and luminescence dating have improved in accuracy, precision, and temporal range. Recently, the development of new approaches, new isotopic/mineral systems and the opportunity to combine these techniques are expanding their range of applications. This session explores these advances and novel applications. These include studies of erosional rates and processes, sediment provenance, burial and transport times, bedrock exposure or cooling histories, landscape dynamics, and the examination of potential biases and discordances in geochronological data. We appreciate contributions that use dating tools which are established or in development, particularly those that quantify geomorphological processes with novel approaches and/or generic implications. We encourage studies that combine different techniques (e.g., CRN, luminescence, thermochronology, etc.) or data sets (e.g., field, remote sensing, numerical modelling), and/or highlight the latest developments and open questions in the application of geochronometers to landscape evolution questions.

Solicited presenter: Nathan Brown - UC Berkeley (USA)