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EMRP

EMRP – Earth Magnetism & Rock Physics

DM5
Convener: Fabio Florindo
Wed, 06 May, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)

EMRP1 – Rock Physics & Mineral Physics

EMRP1.2

Geophysical methods have a great potential for characterizing subsurface properties and couple THM processes to inform geological, reservoir, hydrological, and (bio)geochemical studies. In these contexts, the classically used geophysical tools only provide indirect information about subsurface heterogeneities, reservoir rocks characteristics, thermo-hydro-mechanical coupling, and associated processes (e.g. flow, transport, bio-geochemical reactions). Rock physics relationships hence have to be developed to provide links between physical properties (e.g. electrical conductivity, seismic velocity or attenuation) and the intrinsic parameters of interest (e.g. fluid content, hydraulic properties, coupled processes). In addition, geophysical methods are increasingly deployed as time-lapse, or even continuous, and distributed monitoring tools on more and more complex environments. Here again, there is a great need for accurate and efficient physical relationships such that geophysical data can be correctly interpreted (e.g. included in fully coupled inversions). Establishing such models requires multidisciplinary approaches since involved theoretical frameworks differ. Each physical property has its intrinsic dependence to pore-scale interfacial, geometrical, and (bio)geochemical properties or to external condition (such as pressure or temperature). Each associated geophysical method has its specific investigation depth and spatial resolution which adds a significant level of complexity in combining and scaling theoretical developments with laboratory studies/validations and/or with field experiments. This session consequently invites contributions from various communities to share their models, their experiments, or their field tests and data in order to discuss about multidisciplinary ways to improve our knowledge on reservoir and near surface environment.

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Co-organized by ERE6/HS13
Convener: Damien Jougnot | Co-conveners: Patrick Baud, Guido Blöcher, Ludovic Bodet, Mauro Cacace, Harald Milsch, Jean Schmittbuhl, Sergio Vinciguerra
Displays
| Tue, 05 May, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
EMRP1.4

Rock deformation at different stress levels in the brittle regime and across the brittle-ductile transition is controlled by damage processes occurring on different spatial scales, from grain scale to fractured rock masse. These lead to a progressive increase of micro- and meso-crack intensity in the rock matrix and to the growth of inherited macro-fractures at rock mass scale. Coalescence of these fractures forms large-scale structures such as brittle fault zones and deep-seated rock slide shear zones. Diffuse or localized rock damage have a primary influence on rock properties (strength, elastic moduli, hydraulic and electric properties) and their evolution across multiple temporal scales spanning from geological times to highly dynamic phenomena as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and landslides. In subcritical stress conditions, damage accumulation results in brittle creep processes key to the long-term evolution of geophysical, geomorphological and geo-engineering systems.

Damage and progressive failure processes must be considered to understand the time-dependent hydro-mechanical behaviour of faults (e.g. stick-slip vs asesismic creep), volcanic systems and slopes (e.g. slow rock slope deformation vs catastrophic rock slides), as well as the response of rock masses to stress perturbations induced by artificial excavations (tunnels, mines) and static or dynamic loadings. At the same time, damage processes control the brittle behaviour of the upper crust and are strongly influenced by intrinsic rock properties (strength, fabric, porosity, anisotropy), geological structures and their inherited damage, as well as by the evolving pressure-temperature with increasing depth and by fluid pressure, transport properties and chemistry. However, many complex relationships between these factors and rock damage are yet to be understood.

In this session we will bring together researchers from different communities interested in a better understanding of rock damage processes and consequence. We welcome innovative contributions on experimental studies (both in the laboratory and in situ), continuum / micromechanical analytical and numerical modelling, and applications to fault zones, reservoirs, slope instability and landscape evolution, and engineering applications. Studies adopting novel approaches and combined methodologies are particularly welcome.

Invited speakers:
- Brian Collins  (U.S. Geological Survey)
-  Jérôme Aubry  (Ecole Normale Supérieure de Paris)

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Co-organized by GM4/NH3
Convener: Federico Agliardi | Co-conveners: David Amitrano, Marie ViolayECSECS, Christian Zangerl, Lucas Pimienta, Benedikt Ahrens, Carolina GiorgettiECSECS, Marieke RempeECSECS
Displays
| Tue, 05 May, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
SM2.5

Since 2004, there have been a number of large subduction earthquakes whose unexpected rupture features contributed to the generation of devastating tsunamis. The impact that these events have had on human society highlights the need to improve our knowledge of the key mechanisms behind their origin. Advances in these areas have led to progress in our understanding of the most important parameters affecting tsunamigenesis.

With increasing geophysical data, new descriptions of faulting and rupture complexity are being hypothesized (e.g., spatial and temporal seismic rupture heterogeneity, fault roughness, geometry and sediment type, interseismic coupling, etc.). Rock physicists have proposed new constitutive laws and parameters based on a new generation of laboratory experiments, which simulate close to natural seismic deformation conditions on natural fault samples. In addition, advances in numerical modelling now allow scientists to test how new geophysical observations, e.g. ocean drilling projects and laboratory analyses, influence subduction zone processes over a range of temporal and spatial scales (i.e., geodynamic, seismic cycling, earthquake rupture, wave propagation modelling).

In light of these advances, this session has a twofold mission: i) to integrate recent results from different fields to foster a comprehensive understanding of the key parameters controlling the physics of large subduction earthquakes over a range of spatial and temporal scales; ii) to identify how tsunami hazard analysis can benefit from using a multi-disciplinary approach.

We invite abstracts that enhance interdisciplinary collaboration and integrate observations, rock physics experiments, analog- and numerical modeling, and tsunami hazard.

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Co-organized by EMRP1/NH5/TS5
Convener: Elena SpagnuoloECSECS | Co-conveners: Yoshi Ito, Shane Murphy, Fabrizio Romano
Displays
| Thu, 07 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
SM2.1

This session covers the broad field of earthquake source processes, and
includes the topics of imaging the rupture kinematics and simulating
earthquake dynamics using numerical methods, to develop a deeper
understanding of earthquake source physics. We also invite presentation
that link novel laboratory experiments to earthquake dynamics, and
studies on earthquake scaling properties.

Earthquake sources are imaged using seismic data and surface deformation
measurements (e.g.GPS and InSAR) to estimate rupture properties on
faults and fault systems. Each data set and each method has its strength
and limitations in the context of the source-inversion problem, but the
uncertainties are often not well quantified and the robustness of the
source models not well known.
The session invites contributions that address the source-inversion
problem and provide new methods, innovative applications, and
thought-provoking new ideas. Contributions are welcome that make use of modern
computing paradigms and infrastructure to tackle large-scale forward
simulation of earthquake process, but also inverse modeling to retrieve
the rupture process with proper uncertainty quantification.

Earthquake source imaging, numerical modeling of rupture dynamics, and
source-scaling relations help to understand earthquake source processes.
Furthermore, new numerical modeling approaches for multi-scale
earthquake physics, including earthquake-cycle simulations, may include
fault-zone evolution and even target seismic hazard assessment. The
question that these lines of research are targeting are profound and of
first-order socio-economic relevance:

Which first-order physical processes control, at a given space-time
scale, the macroscopic evolution of dynamic rupture and its seismic
radiation? Is the physics of fault rupture the same for large and small
earthquakes? How can modern earthquake hazard assessment profit from a
deeper understanding of rupture dynamics? Which source processes need to
be considered to better understand, and then model, tsunami generation,
triggering phenomena, induced seismicity and earthquake cycles?

Within this framework our session also provides a forum to discuss case
studies of kinematic or dynamic source modeling of recent significant
earthquakes.

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Co-organized by EMRP1/NH4
Convener: P. Martin Mai | Co-conveners: Alice-Agnes GabrielECSECS, Henriette Sudhaus, Martin Vallée
Displays
| Thu, 07 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
ERE6.2

Numerous cases of induced/triggered seismicity have been reported in the last decades, directly or indirectly related to anthropogenic activity for the geo-resources exploration. Induced earthquakes felt by local population can often negatively affect public perception of geo-energies and may lead to the cancellation of important projects. Furthermore, large earthquakes may jeopardize wellbore stability and damage surface infrastructure. Thus, monitoring and modeling processes leading to fault reactivation, (seismic or aseismic) are critical to develop effective and reliable forecasting methodologies during deep underground exploitation. The complex interaction between injected fluids, subsurface geology, stress interactions, and resulting induced seismicity requires an interdisciplinary approach that accounts for coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical processes to understand the triggering mechanisms.
In this session, we invite contributions from research aimed at investigating the interaction of the above processes during exploitation of underground resources, including hydrocarbon extraction, wastewater disposal, geothermal-energy exploitation, hydraulic fracturing, gas storage and production, mining, and reservoir impoundment for hydro-energy. We particularly encourage novel contributions based on laboratory and underground near-fault experiments, numerical modeling, the spatio-temporal relationship between seismic properties, injection/extraction parameters, and/or geology, and fieldwork. Contributions covering both theoretical and experimental aspects of induced and triggered seismicity at multiple spatial and temporal scales are welcome.

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Co-organized by EMRP1/SM6
Convener: Antonio Pio Rinaldi | Co-conveners: Léna CauchieECSECS, Rebecca Harrington, Marco Maria ScuderiECSECS, Victor Vilarrasa
Displays
| Thu, 07 May, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
TS2.5

The deformation energy budget describes how energy is stored and consumed within crustal systems. Energy stored as uplift against gravity, off-fault deformation and/or mineralogic changes can be released in the creation of new fractures, frictional heating along faults and/or radiated seismic energy. Innovative field measurements, numerical modeling and experimental approaches are providing new constraints on the energy budget within deforming crustal systems. The energy budget framework allows comparison of the energetic importance of diverse deformational processes operating in crustal systems. This framework enables tracking the evolution of the energy budget throughout time, and comparing energy budget partitioning in any tectonic system as individual fault segments propagate, interact and perhaps link. Moreover, the energy budget framework governs the rupture style and slip distribution during an individual earthquake, and is key in understanding multi-fault ruptures. Evidence suggests that new faults develop in order to optimize the overall efficiency of the system. Thus, constraining which processes dominate the budget in various tectonic systems and moments in time may help predict the timing and geometry of fault and rupture propagation and interaction. For this session, we encourage contributions that provide estimates of the evolving components of the energy budget using diverse methods, including numerical models, scaled physical analog experiments, deformation experiments on natural rock, and geophysical and field observations. Interdisciplinary work that combines several of these techniques are particularly encouraged.

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Co-organized by EMRP1
Convener: Jessica McBeckECSECS | Co-conveners: Franciscus AbenECSECS, Michele Cooke, Kurama OkuboECSECS, Francois PasselegueECSECS
Displays
| Wed, 06 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
TS5.3

Earthquake mechanics is controlled by a spectrum of processes covering a wide range of length scales, from tens of kilometres down to few nanometres. While the geometry of the fault/fracture network and its physical properties control the global stress distribution and the propagation/arrest of the seismic rupture, earthquake nucleation and fault weakening is governed by frictional processes occurring within extremely localized sub-planar slipping zones. The co-seismic rheology of the slipping zones themselves depends on deformation mechanisms and dissipative processes active at the scale of the grain or asperity. The study of such complex multiscale systems requires an interdisciplinary approach spanning from structural geology to seismology, geophysics, petrology, rupture modelling and experimental rock deformation. In this session we aim to convene contributions dealing with different aspects of earthquake mechanics at various depths and scales such as:

· the thermo-hydro-mechanical processes associated with co-seismic fault weakening based on rock deformation experiments, numerical simulations and microstructural studies of fault rocks;
· the study of natural and experimental fault rocks to investigate the nucleation mechanisms of intermediate and deep earthquakes in comparison to their shallow counterparts;
· the elastic, frictional and transport properties of fault rocks from the field (geophysical and hydrogeological data) to the laboratory scale (petrophysical and rock deformation studies);
· the internal architecture of seismogenic fault zones from field structural survey and geophysical investigations;
· the modeling of earthquake ruptures, off-fault dynamic stress fields and long-term mechanical evolution of realistic fault networks;
· the earthquake source energy budget and partitioning between fracture, friction and elastic wave radiation from seismological, theoretical and field observations.
· the interplay between fault geometry and earthquake rupture characteristics from seismological, geodetic, remote sensed or field observations;

We particularly welcome novel observations or innovative approaches to the study of earthquake faulting. Contributions from early career scientists are solicited.

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Co-organized by EMRP1/SM2
Convener: Matteo DemurtasECSECS | Co-conveners: Stefano AretusiniECSECS, Michele FondriestECSECS, Francois PasselegueECSECS, Marco Maria ScuderiECSECS
Displays
| Tue, 05 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
GD10.1

Geological and geophysical data sets are in essence the output of physical processes governing the Earth’s evolution. Such data sets are widely varied and range from the internal structure of the Earth (e.g. seismic tomography), plate kinematics (e.g. GPS), composition of geomaterials (e.g. petrography), estimation of physical conditions and dating of key geological events (e.g. thermobarometry), thermal state of the Earth (e.g heat-flow measurements) to more shallow processes such as natural and “engineered” reservoir dynamics and waste sequestration in the subsurface (e.g. seismic imaging).

Combining the abundant data to process-based numerical models fosters our understanding of the dynamical Earth. Process-based models are powerful tools to predict the evolution of complex natural systems resolving the feedbacks among various physical processes. Integrating high-quality data into direct numerical simulations leads to a constructive workflow to further constrain the key parameters within the models. Innovative inversion strategies, linking forward dynamic models with observables, are topics triggering a growing interest within the community.

The complexity of geological systems arises from their multi-physics nature, as they combine hydrological, thermal, chemical and mechanical. Multi-physics couplings are prone to nonlinear interactions ultimately leading to spontaneous localisation of flow and deformation. Understanding the couplings among those processes requires the development of appropriate tools to capture spontaneous localisation and represents a challenging though essential research direction.

We invite contributions from the following two complementary themes:

#1 Computational advances associated with
- alternative spatial and/or temporal discretisation for existing forward/inverse models
- scalable HPC implementations of new and existing methodologies (GPUs / multi-core)
- solver and preconditioner developments
- AI / Machine learning-based approaches
- code and methodology comparisons (“benchmarks”)
- open source implementations for the community

#2 Physics advances associated with
- development of partial differential equations to describe geological processes
- inversion strategies and adjoint-based modelling
- numerical model validation through comparison with observables (data)
- scientific discovery enabled by 2D and 3D modelling
- utilisation of coupled models to explore nonlinear interactions

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Co-organized by EMRP1/SM7/TS10
Convener: Ludovic RässECSECS | Co-conveners: Marie BocherECSECS, Thibault Duretz, Boris Kaus, Dave May, Georg ReuberECSECS, Sabrina SanchezECSECS, Ylona van DintherECSECS
Displays
| Mon, 04 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
ERE2.6

With an increasing demand for low-carbon energy solutions, the need of geothermal resources utilization is accelerating. Geothermal energy can be extracted from various, often complex geological settings, e.g. fractured crystalline rock, magmatic systems or sedimentary basins. Current advancements also target unconventional systems (e.g., Enhanced Geothermal Systems, super-hot, pressurized and co-produced, super-critical systems) besides conventional hydrothermal systems. Optimizing investments leads to the development of associated resources such as lithium, rare earths and hydrogen. This requires a joint effort for monitoring, understanding and modelling geological systems that are specific to each resource.
A sustainable use of geothermal resources requires advanced understanding of the properties of the entire system during exploration as well as monitoring, including geophysical properties, thermo-/petro-physical conditions, fluid composition; structural and hydrological features; and engineering challenges. Challenges faced are, among others, exploration of blind systems, reservoir stimulation, induced seismicity or related to multiphase fluid and scaling processes.

The integration of analogue field studies with real-life production data, from industrial as well as research sites, and their organization and the combination with numerical models, are a hot topic worldwide. With this session we aim to gather field, laboratory and numerical experts who focus their research on geothermal sites, to stimulate discussion in this multi-disciplinary applied research field. We seek for contributions from all disciplines, ranging from field data acquirements and analysis to laboratory experiments, e.g. geophysical surveys or geochemical experiments, and from the management and organization of information to numerical models as well as from (hydro)geologists, geochemists, (geo)physicists, surface and subsurface engineers.

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Co-organized by EMRP1/SM6
Convener: Maren BrehmeECSECS | Co-conveners: Marco Calò, Anne PluymakersECSECS, Ivan Granados ChavarriaECSECS, Eugenio TrumpyECSECS
Displays
| Mon, 04 May, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
ERE6.3

Fractures are discontinuities in rocks that are present in almost all geological settings and at any scale. They may represent small-scale fissures or build up large scale faults. Fractures are extreme forms of heterogeneities, often with a small extension but huge impact.
The presence of fractures modifies the bulk physical properties of the original media by many orders of magnitudes, and they often introduce a strongly nonlinear behavior. This refers in particular to the mechanical properties via reduction of strength and stiffness. Fractures also provide the main flow and transport pathways in hard rock aquifers, dominating over the permeability of the rock matrix, as well as creating anisotropic flow fields and transport. Understanding their hydraulic and mechanical properties of fractures and fracture networks thus are crucial for predicting the movement of any fluid such as of water, air, hydrocarbons, or CO2. Consequently, fractures are of great importance in various disciplines such as hydrogeology, hydrocarbon reservoir management, and geothermal reservoir engineering.
The geologist toolbox to explore and model fractured rocks is getting more and more extended. This session is dedicated to novel ideas and concepts on treating the challenges related to the generic understanding, the characterization and the modelling of fractured geological media.
Contributions are welcome from the following topics
• Exploration methods for mechanical and/or hydraulic characterization of fractured media
• Structural construction of fractured media by deterministic or stochastic approaches,
• Representation of static hydraulic and/or mechanical characteristics of fractured media involving continuous or discontinuous methods,
• Simulation of dynamic processes and the hydraulic and/or mechanical behavior of fractured media,
• Theoretical studies and field applications in fractured geological formations,
• Concepts of accounting for fractured properties specifically in groundwater, petroleum or geothermal management applications.

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Co-organized by EMRP1/TS3
Convener: Márk SomogyváriECSECS | Co-conveners: Florian Amann, Peter Bayer, Mohammadreza Jalali
Displays
| Fri, 08 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
GD8.2

Many regions of the Earth, from crust to core, exhibit anisotropic fabrics which can reveal much about geodynamic processes in the subsurface. These fabrics can exist at a variety of scales, from crystallographic orientations to regional structure alignments. In the past few decades, a tremendous body of multidisciplinary research has been dedicated to characterizing anisotropy in the solid Earth and understanding its geodynamical implications. This has included work in fields such as: (1) geophysics, to make in situ observations and construct models of anisotropic properties at a range of depths; (2) mineral physics, to explain the cause of some of these observations; and (3) numerical modelling, to relate the inferred fabrics to regional stress and flow regimes and, thus, geodynamic processes in the Earth. The study of anisotropy in the Solid Earth encompasses topics so diverse that it often appears fragmented according to regions of interest, e.g., the upper or lower crust, oceanic lithosphere, continental lithosphere, cratons, subduction zones, D'', or the inner core. The aim of this session is to bring together scientists working on different aspects of anisotropy to provide a comprehensive overview of the field. We encourage contributions from all disciplines of the earth sciences (including mineral physics, seismology, magnetotellurics, geodynamic modelling) focused on anisotropy at all scales and depths within the Earth.

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Co-organized by EMRP1/SM4
Convener: Manuele Faccenda | Co-conveners: Sébastien Chevrot, Tuna Eken, Miriam Christina Reiss
Displays
| Thu, 07 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
GD8.1

The goal of this session is to reconcile short-time/small-scale and long-time/large-scale observations, including geodynamic processes such as subduction, collision, rifting or mantle lithosphere interactions. Despite the remarkable advances in experimental rock mechanics, the implications of rock-mechanics data for large temporal and spatial scale tectonic processes are still not straightforward, since the latter are strongly controlled by local lithological stratification of the lithosphere, its thermal structure, fluid content, tectonic heritage, metamorphic reactions and deformation rates.

Mineral reactions have mechanical effects that may result in the development of pressure variations and thus are critical for interpreting microstructural and mineral composition observations. Such effects may fundamentally influence element transport properties and rheological behavior.
Here, we encourage presentations focused on the interplay between metamorphic processes and deformation on all scales, on the rheological behavior of crustal and mantle rocks and time scales of metamorphic reactions in order to discuss
(1) how and when up to GPa-level differential stress and pressure variations can be built and maintained at geological timescales and modelling of such systems,
(2) deviations from lithostatic pressure during metamorphism: fact or fiction?,
(3) the impact of deviations from lithostatic pressure on geodynamic reconstructions.
(4) the effect of porous fluid and partial melting on the long-term strength.
We therefore invite the researchers from different domains (rock mechanics, petrographic observations, geodynamic and thermo-mechanical modelling) to share their views on the way forward for improving our knowledge of the long-term rheology and chemo-thermo-mechanical behavior of the lithosphere and mantle.

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Co-organized by EMRP1/GMPV7/TS3
Convener: Yury Podladchikov | Co-conveners: Shun-ichiro Karato, Magdalena Scheck-Wenderoth, Lucie Tajcmanova, Leif TokleECSECS, Ake Fagereng, Amicia LeeECSECS, Luca Menegon
Displays
| Thu, 07 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST), Thu, 07 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
TS2.3

This session concerns about the interrelation between microstructures and geologic processes. One the one hand, microstructures (fabrics, textures, grain sizes, shapes, etc) can be used to identify or quantify, e.g., deformation, metamorphic, magmatic or diagenetic phenomena (to name a few). On the other hand, physical properties of geo-materials are governed by their microstructure, hence predicting a materials property is greatly enhanced by understanding of how certain processes result in a specific microstructure.

All these mechanisms are likely to cause modification on the rheological, elastic, and thermal properties of these rocks, providing key information on the evolution of the lithosphere.
In this session, we invite contributions from field observations, laboratory experiments, and numerical modelling that relate microstructures to rheology, strain localization or mineral reactions, that use microstructures to tackle general problems in structural, metamorphic, magmatic or economic geology as well as studies quantifying physical and mechanical properties of rocks based on their microstructural and textural properties using well established or novel methods.

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Co-organized by EMRP1/GD8/GMPV1
Convener: Rüdiger Kilian | Co-conveners: Sina MartiECSECS, Luiz F. G. Morales, Michael Stipp
Displays
| Wed, 06 May, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
GD2.1

Dynamic processes shape the Earth and other planets throughout their history. Geochemical observations place major constraints on dynamical processes that operated throughout Earth’s history while seismic imaging gives a snapshot of today’s mantle. Knowledge of physical properties and rheology from mineral physics is key to quantify processes in the mantle, and is undergoing constant advances (e.g. related to the iron spin transition or the thermal conductivity of the core). Magma ocean crystallisation established the initial conditions for subsequent long-term Earth evolution but is not well understood and typically not considered in models of long-term evolution. Modern-day plate tectonics may not have operated in the past; there is active debate about what tectonic mode(s) may have preceded it and their geological and geochemical signatures.

This session aims to provide a multidisciplinary view of the dynamics and evolution of the Earth, including its mantle, lithosphere, core and atmosphere. We welcome contributions that address aspects of this problem including geochemical observations and their interpretation, new mineral physics findings, geodynamical modelling, and seismological observations, on temporal scales ranging from the present day to billions of years, and on spatial scales ranging from microscopic mineralogical samples to global models. Contributions that take a multidisciplinary approach are particularly welcome.

Invited speaker: Matthew Jackson, Saskia Goes, Lorenzo Colli, Paula Koelemeijer

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Co-organized by EMRP1/GMPV4/SM4, co-sponsored by EAG
Convener: Simone PiliaECSECS | Co-conveners: Laura Cobden, Andrea Giuliani, Hauke Marquardt, Maria TsekhmistrenkoECSECS, stephanie durandECSECS, Bernhard Schuberth, Martina UlvrovaECSECS
Displays
| Tue, 05 May, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)

EMRP2 – Geomagnetism

EMRP2.2

Swarm is the fifth Earth Explorer mission approved in ESA’s Living Planet Programme, and was successfully launched on 22 November 2013. The Swarm mission aims to provide the best-ever survey of the geomagnetic field and its temporal evolution, covering a wide variety of Earth processes, ranging from the geodynamo to the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere coupling using a constellation of 3 identical satellites carrying sophisticated magnetometers and electric field instruments. This session invites contributions illustrating the achievements of Swarm for investigating all types of Earth and near-Earth processes, as well as contributions describing synergies with other missions and ongoing initiatives towards designing innovative new low-Earth orbit (LEO) magnetic field missions.

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Convener: Georgios Balasis | Co-conveners: Gauthier Hulot, Anja Strømme
Displays
| Wed, 06 May, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
EMRP2.3

The Earth's magnetic field is continuously monitored by a large number of geomagnetic observatories and satellites in low Earth orbit. In the past years, there has been a growing interest in space weather events and in particular in their potential hazard for the activities and infrastructures of a modern, technologically based society. It is on, or just above, the surface of the Earth indeed that several important practical effects of space weather events are realized. Therefore, both ground-based magnetic observatories and magnetic measurements from satellites can play a significant role in the space weather era. They can be used to monitor space weather events, such as magnetic storms, substorms and geomagnetically induced currents, and furthermore they facilitate studies of dynamic solar-terrestrial events and of their interactions.
The aim of this session is to collect new ideas and results on how magnetic field measurements (from geomagnetic observatories and satellites such as CHAMP, Swarm, CSES, ePOP and so on) can improve our knowledge in the space weather domain and on how they can become useful for service providers, users, and critical infrastructure protection administrations.

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Co-organized by ST4
Convener: Paola De Michelis | Co-conveners: Jerome Bouffard, Ioannis A. Daglis, Mioara Mandea
Displays
| Wed, 06 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
EMRP2.4

This session covers all methods and scales used for registering, processing and interpretation of magnetic field data, from the core to the crustal anomalies and corresponding deep or shallow sources: from satellite missions to oceanic profiles and detailed ground based arrays, and from mathematical processing to petrophysical and geological ground evidence. Presentations on compilation and interpretation methods of heterogenous data sets, useful definitions of magnetic field changes, for scientific Earth's interior studies or natural resources exploration purposes, as well as studies of eventual temporal anomaly changes are also encouraged. New theories of magnetic data modelling and applications in exploration and geological interpretation of magnetic anomalies, jointly with other geodata are warmly welcome. Advanced methods of interpretation based on Machine Learning will be highly considered.

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Convener: Maurizio Fedi | Co-conveners: Abhey Bansal, Tamara Litvinova, Mark Pilkington, Angelo De Santis
Displays
| Thu, 07 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
EMRP2.5

Electromagnetic (EM) geophysical methods are applied on scales ranging from the near-surface to the deep mantle. Aspects of EM induction in geophysics include new instrumentation and data acquisition methods, mathematical and numerical improvements to data processing, modelling, and inversion, ground-based and measurements in the marine environment, airborne and satellite missions. We are interested in studies of EM applied to global induction, imaging regional scale tectonic, magmatic, or volcanic systems, in the search for hydrocarbon, geothermal, or mineral resources, and the investigation of near surface structure relevant to environmental, urban, and hydrological systems. Results from EM methods are often part of multi-disciplinary studies integrating data from rock physics and other geophysical, geochemical, and geological methods to investigate complex subsurface structures and their temporal evolution. Neighbouring fields of research encompass the study of natural and controlled EM sources, geo-magnetically induced currents, space weather, or geomagnetic field studies based on observatory data. This session welcomes contributions on all aspects of EM induction in geophysics.

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Convener: Oliver Ritter | Co-conveners: Svetlana Byrdina, Alexander Grayver, Duygu Kiyan, Anne Neska
Displays
| Thu, 07 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
GI5.1

Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is a safe, advanced, non-destructive and non-invasive imaging technique that can be effectively used for inspecting the subsurface as well as natural and man-made structures. During GPR surveys, a source is used to send high-frequency electromagnetic waves into the ground or structure under test; at the boundaries where the electromagnetic properties of media change, the electromagnetic waves may undergo transmission, reflection, refraction and diffraction; the radar sensors measure the amplitudes and travel times of signals returning to the surface.

This session aims at bringing together scientists, engineers, industrial delegates and end-users working in all GPR areas, ranging from fundamental electromagnetics to the numerous fields of applications. With this session, we wish to provide a supportive framework for (1) the delivery of critical updates on the ongoing research activities, (2) fruitful discussions and development of new ideas, (3) community-building through the identification of skill sets and collaboration opportunities, (4) vital exposure of early-career scientists to the GPR research community.

We have identified a series of topics of interest for this session, listed below.

1. Ground Penetrating Radar instrumentation
- Innovative GPR systems and antennas
- Equipment testing and calibration procedures

2. Ground Penetrating Radar methodology
- Survey planning and data acquisition strategies
- Methods and tools for data analysis, interpretation and visualization
- Data processing, electromagnetic modelling, imaging and inversion techniques
- Studying the relationship between GPR sensed quantities and physical properties of inspected subsurface/structures useful for application needs

3. Ground Penetrating Radar applications and case studies
- Earth sciences
- Civil and environmental engineering
- Archaeology and cultural heritage
- Management of water resources
- Humanitarian mine clearance
- Vital signs detection of trapped people in natural and manmade disasters
- Planetary exploration

4. Combined use of Ground Penetrating Radar and other geoscience instrumentation, in all applications fields

5. Communication and education initiatives and methods

-- Notes --
This session is organized by Members of TU1208 GPR Association (www.gpradar.eu/tu1208), a follow-up initiative of COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 “Civil engineering applications of Ground Penetrating Radar”.

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Co-organized by EMRP2/GM2/NH6
Convener: Aleksandar Ristic | Co-conveners: Alessandro FedeliECSECS, Lara Pajewski, Luis Rees-HughesECSECS, Milan VrtunskiECSECS
Displays
| Wed, 06 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
G4.3

Gravity and magnetic field data contribute to a wide range of geo-scientific research, from imaging the structure of the earth and geodynamic processes (e.g. mass transport phenomena or deformation processes) to near surface investigations. The session is dedicated to contributions related to spatial and temporal variations of the Earth gravity and magnetic field at all scales. Contributions to modern potential field research are welcome, including instrumental issues, data processing techniques, interpretation methods, innovative applications of the results and data collected by modern satellite missions (e.g. GOCE, GRACE, Swarm), potential theory, as well as case histories.

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Co-organized by EMRP2/GD10
Convener: Jörg Ebbing | Co-conveners: Anne BarnoudECSECS, Carla Braitenberg, Mikhail Kaban
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| Tue, 05 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
GD3.1

Our understanding of Earth's inner and outer core is progressing at a rapid pace thanks to cross-fertilization between a number of observational, theoretical and experimental disciplines.

Improved seismic observations continue to provide better images of the core and prompt refinements in structural and geodynamic models. Mineral physics provides constraints for dynamic, structural, and thermodynamic models. The heat budget of the core, paleomagnetic observations, and models promote the exploration of new dynamo mechanisms. Geomagnetic observations from both ground and satellite, along with magneto-hydrodynamic experiments, provide additional insight to our ever expanding view of Earth's core.

This session welcomes contributions from all disciplines, as well as interdisciplinary efforts, on attempts to proceed towards an integrated, self-consistent picture of core structure, dynamics and history, and to understand its overwhelming complexity.

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Co-organized by EMRP2
Convener: Sébastien Merkel | Co-conveners: Lennart de Groot, Arwen Deuss, Jerome Noir
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| Fri, 08 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
PS4.1

InSight landed on Mars on November 26th, 2018, bringing the first geophysical observatory to the surface of Mars. It attempts to constrain the interior structure of the planet and identify key physical processes that have shaped its evolution. At the time of the meeting, the instruments have been operating at full capacity for 14 months, or about half a Martian year. This session invites contributions from numerical modeling, experimental studies and data processing from various disciplines such as but not limited to geophysics, geology and geochemistry that aim to evaluate, interpret and complement the seismic and heat flow measurements, as well as rotational state, magnetic and atmospheric data of the InSight mission.
This interdisciplinary session will gather together results welcoming all research, whether part of the mission team or not.

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Co-organized by EMRP2/G6/GD11/SM1
Convener: Simon C. StählerECSECS | Co-conveners: Brigitte Knapmeyer-Endrun, Ana-Catalina PlesaECSECS
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| Mon, 04 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
NP4.1

This interdisciplinary session welcomes contributions on novel conceptual approaches and methods for the analysis of observational as well as model time series from all geoscientific disciplines.

Methods to be discussed include, but are not limited to:
- linear and nonlinear methods of time series analysis
- time-frequency methods
- predictive approaches
- statistical inference for nonlinear time series
- nonlinear statistical decomposition and related techniques for multivariate and spatio-temporal data
- nonlinear correlation analysis and synchronisation
- surrogate data techniques
- filtering approaches and nonlinear methods of noise reduction
- artificial intelligence and machine learning based analysis and prediction for univariate and multivariate time series

Contributions on methodological developments and applications to problems across all geoscientific disciplines are equally encouraged.

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Co-organized by CL5/EMRP2/ESSI2/HS3
Convener: Reik Donner | Co-conveners: Tommaso AlbertiECSECS, Andrea Toreti
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| Thu, 07 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
G1.2

The analysis of the Earth's gravity and magnetic fields is becoming increasingly important in geosciences. Modern satellite missions are continuing to provide data with ever improving accuracy and nearly global, time-dependent coverage. The gravitational field plays an important role in climate research, as a record of and reference for the observation of mass transport. The study of the Earth's magnetic field and its temporal variations is yielding new insights into the behavior of its internal and external sources. Both gravity and magnetic data furthermore constitute primary sources of information also for the global characterization of other planets. Hence, there continues to be a need to develop new methods of analysis, at the global and local scales, and especially on their interface. For over two decades now, methods that combine global with local sensitivity, often in a multiresolution setting, have been developed: these include wavelets, radial basis functions, Slepian functions, splines, spherical cap harmonics, etc. One purpose of this session is to provide a forum for exchange of research projects, whether related to forward or inverse modeling, theoretical, computational, or observational studies.
Besides monitoring the variations of the gravity and magnetic fields, space geodetic techniques deliver time series describing changes of the surface geometry, sea level change variations or fluctuations in the Earth's orientation. However, geodetic observation systems usually measure the integral effect. Thus, analysis methods have to be applied to the geodetic time series for a better understanding of the relations between and within the components of the system Earth. The combination of data from various space geodetic and remote sensing techniques may allow for separating the integral measurements into individual contributions of the Earth system components. Presentations to time frequency analysis, to the detection of features of the temporal or spatial variability of signals existing in geodetic data and in geophysical models, as well as to the investigations on signal separation techniques, e.g. EOF, are highly appreciated. We further solicit papers on different prediction techniques e.g. least-squares, neural networks, Kalman filter or uni- or multivariate autoregressive methods to forecast Earth Orientation Parameters, which are needed for real-time transformation between celestial and terrestrial reference frames.

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Co-organized by EMRP2
Convener: Volker Michel | Co-conveners: Katrin Bentel, Christian Gerhards, Wieslaw Kosek, Michael Schmidt
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| Tue, 05 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
SM7.1

Innovative forward and inverse modeling techniques, advances in numerical solvers and the ever-increasing power of high-performance compute clusters have driven recent developments in inverting seismic and other geophysical data to reveal properties of the Earth at all scales.

The interpretation of single disciplinary geophysical field data often allows for various, equally probable models that may not always sufficiently discern plausible hypotheses that are challenged. Therefore, co-validation of data from different disciplines is critical.

This session provides a forum to present, discuss and learn the state-of-the-art in computational seismology, non-linear and joint inversion, uncertainty quantification and collaborative interpretation.

Invited Speakers:
Christel Tiberi, "Joint inversion and collaborative interpretations in complex geodynamical context";
Andrew Curtis, "Variational Probabilistic Tomography";
Yann Capdeville, "Intrinsic non-uniqueness of the acoustic full waveform inverse problem"

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Co-organized by EMRP2/ESSI1/GD10
Convener: Christian Boehm | Co-conveners: Maik NeukirchECSECS, Anne BarnoudECSECS, Ebru Bozdag, Stéphanie Gautier, Lion Krischer, Christian SchifferECSECS, Zack SpicaECSECS
Displays
| Mon, 04 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)

EMRP3 – Paleomagnetism

EMRP3.2

Rock magnetism has a broad range of applications in paleo- and archeo-magnetism, biogeomagnetism, environmental magnetism, and planetary magnetism. Rock magnetic studies on natural and synthetic materials bring new insights on the magnetic properties of iron-bearing minerals and their response to physical, chemical and environmental changes.

This session aims to be a forum for the study of magnetism in natural materials in its broadest sense. We seek contributions on developing new and rethinking old methods and instrumentation, investigating properties of magnetic minerals occurring in a wide variety of terrestrial and extraterrestrial rocks, and applying this knowledge to solve outstanding problems in Earth and planetary sciences. Contributions on theoretical, numerical and experimental approaches in paleomagnetism rock and environmental magnetism are also welcome.

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Convener: Andrei Kosterov | Co-conveners: Myriam Kars, Ramon Egli, Yongxin Pan, Ioan Lascu, Anne-Christine Da Silva
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| Mon, 04 May, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
EMRP3.5

The detailed understanding of the geomagnetic field strength (palaeointensity) is fundamental for several Sciences disciplines (Geophysics, Stratigraphy and Volcanology, Engineering, Paleoclimatology, Human history and Archaeology, Art, etc..). Despite the great effort made to improve time and space resolution of both regional and global reconstructions, fundamental properties of the geomagnetic field, such as the average strength and its spatial and temporal short and long-term variations, remain debated and fundamental questions remain unanswered. Indeed, the methods to determine past geomagnetic field strength present difficulties and discrepancies, resulting in scattered and sparse records.

This session welcomes abstracts presenting methodological advances, new data and models for a better understanding of the strength of the Earth´s magnetic field and features. Contributions presenting absolute and relative palaeointensities, rock magnetic and micromagnetic investigation applied to address the palaeointensity determination issue are also welcomed.

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Convener: Anita Di ChiaraECSECS | Co-conveners: Andreas Nilsson, Miriam Gomez-Paccard MiriaGomez-Paccard, Joseph Stoner, Chuang Xuan
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| Tue, 05 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
EMRP3.8

Recent methodological and instrumental advances in paleomagnetic and magnetic fabric techniques are continuously increasing their already high potential in solving research questions in various Earth science disciplines. In this session, we highlight these theoretical and methodological advances and the universal application of paleomagnetism. In particular, the session will explore contributions combining paleomagnetic and magnetic fabric data retrieved by several means of fabric analysis (magnetic and non-magnetic) and novel approaches in data evaluation. Applications presented will bear on fundamental interpretations of paleomagnetic data, tectonic reconstructions, the nature of the past geomagnetic field and the use of magnetism to track the dispersal of humans and their impacts on the environment.

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Convener: Martin Chadima | Co-conveners: John Tarduno, Andrea Regina Biedermann, Juan José Villalaín, Catherine Kissel, Yongxin Pan
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| Mon, 04 May, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
SSP1.4

Scientific drilling through the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) and the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) continues to provide unique opportunities to investigate the workings of the interior of our planet, Earth’s cycles, natural hazards and the distribution of subsurface microbial life. The past and current scientific drilling programs have brought major advances in many multidisciplinary fields of socio-economic relevance, such as climate and ecosystem evolution, palaeoceanography, the deep biosphere, deep crustal and tectonic processes, geodynamics and geohazards. This session invites contributions that present and/or review recent scientific results from deep Earth sampling and monitoring through ocean and continental drilling projects. Furthermore, we encourage contributions that outline perspectives and visions for future drilling projects, in particular projects using a multi-platform approach.

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Co-organized by CL5/EMRP3/NH5, co-sponsored by JpGU
Convener: Antony Morris | Co-conveners: Jorijntje Henderiks, Thomas Wiersberg
Displays
| Tue, 05 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
GD6.2

Since the Neoproterozoic breakup of the supercontinent Rodinia, continental fragments episodically rifted from their original location and systematically drifted towards more northerly positions, culminating in the Late Palaeozoic amalgamation of the supercontinent Pangaea. In this session we focus on the processes responsible for the transportation of terranes from Gondwana to the northern continental masses (Baltica, Laurentia, and later Laurussia) before, during and after the collision between Laurussia and Gondwana and the amalgamation of Pangaea. We welcome multi-disciplinary (tectonics, geodynamics, basin analysis, palaeomagnetism, palaeogeography, plate reconstruction, etc.) contributions dealing with i) the geodynamic evolution (rift-drift-accretion) of terranes such as Ganderia, Avalonia, Carolinia, Meguma, Armorica, Moesia, North China, South China, etc., ii) the fate of intervening oceans (Iapetus, Rheic, Palaeotethys, Neotethys, etc.) and iii) the geodynamic drivers of their respective evolutions.
Contribution to IGCP project No. 648: Supercontinent Cycles and Global Geodynamics.

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Co-organized by EMRP3/TS14
Convener: Cecilio Quesada | Co-conveners: Brendan Murphy, Daniel Pastor-Galán, Weihua YaoECSECS
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| Fri, 08 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
SSP2.13

Interactions between tectonics, climate and biotic evolution are ideally expressed in Asian orogenies. The ongoing surge of international research on Asian regions enables to better constrain paleoenvironmental changes and biotic evolutions as well as their potential driving mechanisms such as global climate, the India-Asia collision and the tectonic growth of the Himalayan-Tibetan and other Asian orogens. Together these efforts allow for a comprehensive paleogeographic and paleoenvironmental reconstructions that enable to constrain climate modelling experiments which permit validation of hypotheses on potential interactions.
The goal of this session is to assemble research efforts that constrain Asian tectonic, climate (monsoons, westerlies, aridification), land-sea distribution, surface processes or paleobiogeographic evolution at various timescales. We invite contributions from any discipline aiming for this goal including broadly integrated stratigraphy, tectonic, biogeology, climate modelling, geodynamic, oceanography, geochemistry or petrology.

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Co-organized by CL1/EMRP3/GD7/TS7
Convener: Guillaume Dupont-Nivet | Co-conveners: Frederic Fluteau, Carina Hoorn, Niels MeijerECSECS, Douwe J. J. van Hinsbergen
Displays
| Fri, 08 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)

EMRP4 – Short Courses