Union-wide
Inter- and Transdisciplinary Sessions
Disciplinary sessions AS–GM
Disciplinary sessions GMPV–TS

Session programme

GD8

GD – Geodynamics

Programme group chair: Paul Tackley

GD8 – Multiscale Rheology, Physical Properties and Geodynamic Processes

GD8.1

The goal of this session is to reconcile short-time/small-scale and long-time/large-scale observations, including geodynamic processes such as subduction, collision, rifting or mantle lithosphere interactions. Despite the remarkable advances in experimental rock mechanics, the implications of rock-mechanics data for large temporal and spatial scale tectonic processes are still not straightforward, since the latter are strongly controlled by local lithological stratification of the lithosphere, its thermal structure, fluid content, tectonic heritage, metamorphic reactions and deformation rates.

Mineral reactions have mechanical effects that may result in the development of pressure variations and thus are critical for interpreting microstructural and mineral composition observations. Such effects may fundamentally influence element transport properties and rheological behavior.
Here, we encourage presentations focused on the interplay between metamorphic processes and deformation on all scales, on the rheological behavior of crustal and mantle rocks and time scales of metamorphic reactions in order to discuss
(1) how and when up to GPa-level differential stress and pressure variations can be built and maintained at geological timescales and modelling of such systems,
(2) deviations from lithostatic pressure during metamorphism: fact or fiction?,
(3) the impact of deviations from lithostatic pressure on geodynamic reconstructions.
(4) the effect of porous fluid and partial melting on the long-term strength.
We therefore invite the researchers from different domains (rock mechanics, petrographic observations, geodynamic and thermo-mechanical modelling) to share their views on the way forward for improving our knowledge of the long-term rheology and chemo-thermo-mechanical behavior of the lithosphere and mantle.

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Co-organized by EMRP1/GMPV7/TS3
Convener: Yury Podladchikov | Co-conveners: Shun-ichiro Karato, Magdalena Scheck-Wenderoth, Lucie Tajcmanova, Leif TokleECSECS, Ake Fagereng, Amicia LeeECSECS, Luca Menegon
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST), Attendance Thu, 07 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
GD8.2

Many regions of the Earth, from crust to core, exhibit anisotropic fabrics which can reveal much about geodynamic processes in the subsurface. These fabrics can exist at a variety of scales, from crystallographic orientations to regional structure alignments. In the past few decades, a tremendous body of multidisciplinary research has been dedicated to characterizing anisotropy in the solid Earth and understanding its geodynamical implications. This has included work in fields such as: (1) geophysics, to make in situ observations and construct models of anisotropic properties at a range of depths; (2) mineral physics, to explain the cause of some of these observations; and (3) numerical modelling, to relate the inferred fabrics to regional stress and flow regimes and, thus, geodynamic processes in the Earth. The study of anisotropy in the Solid Earth encompasses topics so diverse that it often appears fragmented according to regions of interest, e.g., the upper or lower crust, oceanic lithosphere, continental lithosphere, cratons, subduction zones, D'', or the inner core. The aim of this session is to bring together scientists working on different aspects of anisotropy to provide a comprehensive overview of the field. We encourage contributions from all disciplines of the earth sciences (including mineral physics, seismology, magnetotellurics, geodynamic modelling) focused on anisotropy at all scales and depths within the Earth.

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Co-organized by EMRP1/SM4
Convener: Manuele Faccenda | Co-conveners: Sébastien Chevrot, Tuna Eken, Miriam Christina Reiss
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
TS2.3

This session concerns about the interrelation between microstructures and geologic processes. One the one hand, microstructures (fabrics, textures, grain sizes, shapes, etc) can be used to identify or quantify, e.g., deformation, metamorphic, magmatic or diagenetic phenomena (to name a few). On the other hand, physical properties of geo-materials are governed by their microstructure, hence predicting a materials property is greatly enhanced by understanding of how certain processes result in a specific microstructure.

All these mechanisms are likely to cause modification on the rheological, elastic, and thermal properties of these rocks, providing key information on the evolution of the lithosphere.
In this session, we invite contributions from field observations, laboratory experiments, and numerical modelling that relate microstructures to rheology, strain localization or mineral reactions, that use microstructures to tackle general problems in structural, metamorphic, magmatic or economic geology as well as studies quantifying physical and mechanical properties of rocks based on their microstructural and textural properties using well established or novel methods.

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Co-organized by EMRP1/GD8/GMPV1
Convener: Rüdiger Kilian | Co-conveners: Sina MartiECSECS, Luiz F. G. Morales, Michael Stipp
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)