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Tips for effectively communicating your research with the public

“Science isn't finished until it's communicated. The communication to wider audiences is part of the job of being a scientist, and so how you communicate is absolutely vital.” - Professor Sir Mark Walport, Chief Scientific Advisor to the UK government

Science is vital to society. It allows civilisations to advance, economies to prosper and provides solutions to societal problems. Unfortunately, the benefits of science aren’t automatically understood by the wider public – they must be communicated!

Communicating your science to a broader audience can also be hugely beneficial on a personal level – potentially boosting you profile as an expert, connecting you with new research and/or industry partners, and sparking ideas for new areas of research. Communicating your research to citizens is obviously important but how to communicate effectively to a non-scientific community isn’t always so straightforward. The first half of this session will outline some tips to communicate your research with the public, the challenges that scientists may face and how these can be overcome.

The second half of the session will feature speakers who are working to bridge the gap between research and society. They will outline some institutionalised routes that scientists can take to connect with citizens and provide examples of when it has had unexpected benefits.

Public information:
Session Moderator: Alicia Newton: Director of Science and Communications, Geological Society of London

Speakers:
- Phil Heron: Winner of a 2019 EGU Public Engagement Grant (https://egu.eu/0FZFM7/)
- Aisling Irwin: freelance science journalist and winner of EGU's 2020 Science Journalism Fellowship (https://egu.eu/9MN60T/)
- Sam Illingworth: Associate Professor at Edinburgh Napier University and Chief Executive Editor of Geoscience Communication (www.samillingworth.com)
Co-organized by SSP5
Convener: Chloe Hill | Co-convener: Alicia Newton
Thu, 22 Apr, 14:30–15:30 (CEST)
Public information:
Session Moderator: Alicia Newton: Director of Science and Communications, Geological Society of London

Speakers:
- Phil Heron: Winner of a 2019 EGU Public Engagement Grant (https://egu.eu/0FZFM7/)
- Aisling Irwin: freelance science journalist and winner of EGU's 2020 Science Journalism Fellowship (https://egu.eu/9MN60T/)
- Sam Illingworth: Associate Professor at Edinburgh Napier University and Chief Executive Editor of Geoscience Communication (www.samillingworth.com)

Speakers

  • Sam Illingworth, Edinburgh Napier University, United Kingdom
  • Aisling Irwin
  • Phil Heron, University of Toronto, Canada