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How to influence policy through engaging with Parliaments
Convener: Chloe HillECSECS | Co-convener: Sarah Foxen

Never has it been more important that geoscience research feeds into political decisions and policymaking. What is more, today many policymakers and institutions are increasingly receptive to scientific evidence. Yet, whilst researchers are increasingly keen to influence policy and policymaking, for many the mechanisms for engagement and impact seem unclear and inaccessible.

This course will demystify policymaking and give researchers the tools to be able to engage with policy through their research.

In the first part of this short course, researchers will learn about how national and supranational parliaments use evidence in their policy shaping processes, including legislation, scrutiny and debating. In particular, they will learn about how legislative science advice or technology assessment mechanisms draw on research evidence to provide advice to parliaments. The course will focus on three examples: the UK Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology (POST), the Austrian Institute of Technology Assessment (ITA) and the European Parliament’s Science and Technology Options Assessment panel (STOA). However, it will also make reference to other mechanisms around the world.
In the second part of the course, researchers will learn how to present research and findings to a parliamentary audience. They will then develop their skills in writing for a policy audience: with the support of the course leaders and fellow course attendees, they will draft a policy brief from one of their publications.

Course trainers: The course will be delivered by staff from the UK Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology (POST), the Austrian Institute of Technology Assessment (ITA) and the European Parliament’s Science and Technology Options Assessment panel (STOA).

Course pre-requisites: Attendees are requested to bring along one of their (single-authored or collaborative) publications, to use in the second half of the course. If attendees do not yet have any publications, they may bring along either a complete draft article or an article authored by someone else, which they are familiar with.