US2

The role of the geosciences in preserving and restoring biodiversity

The biodiversity of the planet is inextricably tied to the future of humanity. Our impacts on, and ability to find solutions to, the alarmingly accelerating loss of species may not only define their survival but our own future too.

Biodiversity encompasses the variety of living organisms on Earth, including their habitats and their interactions. It supports our food system, increases community resilience, and underpins global GDP. Biodiversity is both vital for and impacted by agriculture, freshwater ecosystems, biogeosystems, soil health, climate change, natural hazards, and pollution. Despite the undeniable importance of biodiversity on environmental and societal wellbeing, ecosystems are being damaged and disappearing at an ever-faster rate.

Preserving and restoring biodiversity are incredibly complex tasks that will require both scientific expertise and intersectoral collaboration. This Union Symposium will highlight some of the key biodiversity challenges that humanity is currently facing and how they can potentially be overcome. It will also outline some of the recent European biodiversity targets and legislation, what’s coming next, how geoscience is being used to find solutions, and where more research is needed.

The Symposia panel will include geoscientists working in areas related to the biodiversity and policymakers who are currently working on European biodiversity initiatives and who are concerned by integrative pathways to be explored with water, climate, soil, oceans, natural hazards, biogeosystems, and Earth observations. The session will include presentations from these speakers as well as a moderated discussion on how geoscientists can best support the Europe’s biodiversity targets and a Q&A with the audience. While this session will have a European focus, it will also emphasise the importance of biodiversity as a global issue.

Public information:

Panelists:

  • Philippe Tulkens, Head of Unit, European Commission, DG Research & Innovation, Healthy Planet Directorate – Climate and Planetary Boundaries Unit (RTD.B3).
  • Gregoire Dubois: Manager of the European Commission Knowledge Centre for Biodiversity
  • Marie Vandewalle: Head of the Eklipse Management Body and researcher in the Science-Policy expert group at the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ in Germany.
  • Bikem Ekberzade: PhD candidate for Marine and Climate Sciences at Eurasian Institute for Earth System Sciences at Istanbul Technical University in Turkey. Author, radio producer, and photojournalist.

Session Moderator: Noel Baker, Project manager at the Royal Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy and EGU Science for Policy Working Group member

Convener: Chloe Hill | Co-conveners: Claudio Zaccone, Maria-Helena Ramos, Noel Baker
Mon, 23 May, 13:20–14:50 (CEST)
 
Room E1
Public information:

Panelists:

  • Philippe Tulkens, Head of Unit, European Commission, DG Research & Innovation, Healthy Planet Directorate – Climate and Planetary Boundaries Unit (RTD.B3).
  • Gregoire Dubois: Manager of the European Commission Knowledge Centre for Biodiversity
  • Marie Vandewalle: Head of the Eklipse Management Body and researcher in the Science-Policy expert group at the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ in Germany.
  • Bikem Ekberzade: PhD candidate for Marine and Climate Sciences at Eurasian Institute for Earth System Sciences at Istanbul Technical University in Turkey. Author, radio producer, and photojournalist.

Session Moderator: Noel Baker, Project manager at the Royal Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy and EGU Science for Policy Working Group member

Session assets

Session materials

Speakers

  • Philippe Tulkens, European Commission, Benin
  • Gregoire Dubois, European Commission, Italy
  • Marie Vandewalle, UFZ , Germany
  • Bikem Ekberzade, Istanbul Technical University, Türkiye
  • Noel Baker, Royal Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Belgium