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EOS4.8 | Climate and ocean change communication, education and geoethics: Crisis, crime, survival, war, …

EOS4.8

EDI
Climate and ocean change communication, education and geoethics: Crisis, crime, survival, war, …
IAPG
Convener: David Crookall | Co-conveners: Giuseppe Di Capua, Svitlana Krakovska, Bärbel Winkler, Dean PageECSECS

Last year (2023) many records were broken. For example, Simone Biles’ magnificent feat in gymnastics. However, her record pales into insignificance in face of other records that have fallen, such as those for temperatures on Earth. In July 2023, the global mean temperature exceeded the Paris 1.5°C threshold above preindustrial levels. The global sea surface temperature for July reached new highs. See https://climate.copernicus.eu/july-2023-sees-multiple-global-temperature-records-broken.

“The world is heading towards 2-3°C of global warming. This sets Earth on course to cross multiple dangerous tipping points that will be disastrous for people across the world. To maintain liveable conditions on Earth, protect people from rising extremes, and enable stable societies, we must do everything possible to prevent crossing tipping points.” Rockström (in 2022)

We talk about climate change, but the ocean is also changing. Indeed, it is impossible to separate climate and ocean, especially as global phenomena. Both climate and ocean change are fundamentally symptoms of ‘deeper’ dynamics, such as overshoot (going beyond limits and boundaries) and unsustainability (see work by Jancovici, Meadows, Rahmstorf, Rees, Rockström, Steffen, et al).

This state of affairs raises fundamental, existential questions in regard to climate and ocean education, communication and geoethics. What should be prioritized? Who should be educated (youth, students, politicians, oil barons, …)? How should any effective education be accomplished? What type of communication should be emphasized? With what expectation for positive results? How realistic should we be in our objectives? What geoethical principles can guide us in looking for answers? What does science, experience and wisdom have to offer? These questions are relevant, mutatis mutandis, to related threats, such as biodiversity, pollution, food security and fossil-fuel-driven war.

We welcome presentations on a broad range of topics, from hands-on geo-communication of all kinds, through pedagogical ideas and practices, curriculum matters and research, to policy and its implementation. Come and share your experience, your ideas, your anger, your vision, your research, your drive, your actions, your success, … .

You are also invited to contribute to a special issue (SI) of the EGU journal Geoscience Communication. See https://www.geoscience-communication.net/articles_and_preprints/scheduled_sis.html

Last year (2023) many records were broken. For example, Simone Biles’ magnificent feat in gymnastics. However, her record pales into insignificance in face of other records that have fallen, such as those for temperatures on Earth. In July 2023, the global mean temperature exceeded the Paris 1.5°C threshold above preindustrial levels. The global sea surface temperature for July reached new highs. See https://climate.copernicus.eu/july-2023-sees-multiple-global-temperature-records-broken.

“The world is heading towards 2-3°C of global warming. This sets Earth on course to cross multiple dangerous tipping points that will be disastrous for people across the world. To maintain liveable conditions on Earth, protect people from rising extremes, and enable stable societies, we must do everything possible to prevent crossing tipping points.” Rockström (in 2022)

We talk about climate change, but the ocean is also changing. Indeed, it is impossible to separate climate and ocean, especially as global phenomena. Both climate and ocean change are fundamentally symptoms of ‘deeper’ dynamics, such as overshoot (going beyond limits and boundaries) and unsustainability (see work by Jancovici, Meadows, Rahmstorf, Rees, Rockström, Steffen, et al).

This state of affairs raises fundamental, existential questions in regard to climate and ocean education, communication and geoethics. What should be prioritized? Who should be educated (youth, students, politicians, oil barons, …)? How should any effective education be accomplished? What type of communication should be emphasized? With what expectation for positive results? How realistic should we be in our objectives? What geoethical principles can guide us in looking for answers? What does science, experience and wisdom have to offer? These questions are relevant, mutatis mutandis, to related threats, such as biodiversity, pollution, food security and fossil-fuel-driven war.

We welcome presentations on a broad range of topics, from hands-on geo-communication of all kinds, through pedagogical ideas and practices, curriculum matters and research, to policy and its implementation. Come and share your experience, your ideas, your anger, your vision, your research, your drive, your actions, your success, … .

You are also invited to contribute to a special issue (SI) of the EGU journal Geoscience Communication. See https://www.geoscience-communication.net/articles_and_preprints/scheduled_sis.html