Please note that this session was withdrawn and is no longer available in the respective programme. This withdrawal might have been the result of a merge with another session.

ITS3.26/ERE6.3 | From boreholes and digital twins to planning and policy: Communicating the opportunities and challenges in Urban subsurface in the next 10 years
From boreholes and digital twins to planning and policy: Communicating the opportunities and challenges in Urban subsurface in the next 10 years
Convener: Tim Kearsey | Co-conveners: Francesco La Vigna, Stephanie Bricker, Guri Venvik

Urban areas are in constant development, both above and below the surface. Challenges related to the subsurface are interdisciplinary in nature and geoscience information has traditionally been under-utilized in urban planning, as its significance is often misunderstood or underappreciated. Yet, unforeseen ground conditions during construction are one of the primary causes of construction project delays and overspend.
Providing relevant and more accessible geological data to the user at the right time and in the right format is crucial to help save money, improve efficiency in planning and development, in resource extraction (water, geothermal, minerals) and to reduce the impacts of geological hazards. It is important to develop platforms for communication between geoscientists, planners and policy makers. Geoscience-data with data exchange, digital workflows and 3D geological modelling for example, by applying the Building Information Modelling (BIM) and City Information Modelling (CIM) provides a mechanism to represent the city below ground. Progress on this topic would enhance the use of geological data across the construction, infrastructure and planning sectors and allow a digital connection between surface and subsurface data and models. This session welcomes a full range of urban geology contributions that showcase the significance of geoscience in urban settings including collaborative case study projects, research results, data management and policy exemplars, 3D-4D digital twins and urban data-tools for non-geologists.