Europlanet Science Congress 2020
Virtual meeting
21 September – 9 October 2020
Europlanet Science Congress 2020
Virtual meeting
21 September – 9 October 2020
SB8

In the recent years there were several attempts to obtain asteroid light curves from large surveys, both observed from the ground and space. These surveys are originally dedicated to other kind of science, like detection of microlensing events, or are transient surveys (e.g. the Zwicky Transient Factory). From space the GAIA mission and surveys dedicated to exoplanet research are the most successful in this respect. E.g. the Kepler/K2 and the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) space missions have already produced a large number of asteroid light curves, and still has an enormous potential to provide rotation characteristics for additional objects from the main belt to the transneptunian region. Recent results from TESS clearly indicate that this kind of light curve observations will supersede most ground based measurements in terms of accuracy. Surveys aimed at observing the thermal emission of asteroids (e.g. NEOWISE) continue to provide important physical properties (size and albedo), not available otherwise. This EPSC 2020 session aims to summarise the results achieved in the last years using data from big surveys, discuss how these data changed our understanding of the physical properties of asteroids both as individual objects and as populations, what the challenges and possible solutions are in data reduction, what we can expect from current and upcoming missions with similar scales in the big data era, and how the role of dedicated observations of individual targets will change in the future. Papers discussing all aspects of small body surveys are welcomed, with a special emphasis on recent light curve survey results.

Share:
Conveners: Rene Duffard, Csaba Kiss, András Pál | Co-conveners: Joseph Masiero, Sarah Sonnett

In the recent years there were several attempts to obtain asteroid light curves from large surveys, both observed from the ground and space. These surveys are originally dedicated to other kind of science, like detection of microlensing events, or are transient surveys (e.g. the Zwicky Transient Factory). From space the GAIA mission and surveys dedicated to exoplanet research are the most successful in this respect. E.g. the Kepler/K2 and the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) space missions have already produced a large number of asteroid light curves, and still has an enormous potential to provide rotation characteristics for additional objects from the main belt to the transneptunian region. Recent results from TESS clearly indicate that this kind of light curve observations will supersede most ground based measurements in terms of accuracy. Surveys aimed at observing the thermal emission of asteroids (e.g. NEOWISE) continue to provide important physical properties (size and albedo), not available otherwise. This EPSC 2020 session aims to summarise the results achieved in the last years using data from big surveys, discuss how these data changed our understanding of the physical properties of asteroids both as individual objects and as populations, what the challenges and possible solutions are in data reduction, what we can expect from current and upcoming missions with similar scales in the big data era, and how the role of dedicated observations of individual targets will change in the future. Papers discussing all aspects of small body surveys are welcomed, with a special emphasis on recent light curve survey results.

Session assets

Session summary