Please note that this session was withdrawn and is no longer available in the respective programme. This withdrawal might have been the result of a merge with another session.
TP8 | Planetary seismology – in theory and practice

TP8

Planetary seismology – in theory and practice
Convener: Iris van Zelst | Co-conveners: Anna Horleston, Naomi Murdoch, Maxence Lefevre

Seismology is one of the most powerful tools we have for studying the interior of planetary bodies and their tectonic regimes. However, studying the seismicity of solid bodies other than the Earth is technically challenging and the seismic data we currently have is sparse. And yet, the Apollo lunar dataset is still being studied and the InSight mission proved highly successful even with only a single seismic station. The selection of Dragonfly by NASA promises a wealth of seismological observations of Titan and the Farside Seismic Suite which is scheduled to fly to the farside of the Moon on a commercial lander in the next few years will enhance our understanding of lunar seismicity. Small body seismology is becoming a hot topic, with space agencies considering seismometers for inclusion in future missions to asteroids and comets. Add to this the hopes for a Lunar Geophysical Network and the investigation of seismic techniques for use on the surface and within the atmosphere of Venus and it is obvious that planetary seismology is a broad field with many future opportunities.

This session aims to bring together seismological studies from any planetary body – everything from theory and technical design for current or future missions to data analysis, and insights on the seismicity and interior structures of planets and small bodies from past missions. Whether you are working on Enceladus or the Moon, modelling or archiving, atmospheres or planetary interiors, or anything in between, this is the session to be in for planetary seismology!

Seismology is one of the most powerful tools we have for studying the interior of planetary bodies and their tectonic regimes. However, studying the seismicity of solid bodies other than the Earth is technically challenging and the seismic data we currently have is sparse. And yet, the Apollo lunar dataset is still being studied and the InSight mission proved highly successful even with only a single seismic station. The selection of Dragonfly by NASA promises a wealth of seismological observations of Titan and the Farside Seismic Suite which is scheduled to fly to the farside of the Moon on a commercial lander in the next few years will enhance our understanding of lunar seismicity. Small body seismology is becoming a hot topic, with space agencies considering seismometers for inclusion in future missions to asteroids and comets. Add to this the hopes for a Lunar Geophysical Network and the investigation of seismic techniques for use on the surface and within the atmosphere of Venus and it is obvious that planetary seismology is a broad field with many future opportunities.

This session aims to bring together seismological studies from any planetary body – everything from theory and technical design for current or future missions to data analysis, and insights on the seismicity and interior structures of planets and small bodies from past missions. Whether you are working on Enceladus or the Moon, modelling or archiving, atmospheres or planetary interiors, or anything in between, this is the session to be in for planetary seismology!