Session programme

ODAA – Outreach, Diversity, Amateur Astronomy

Programme group coordinators: Arianna Piccialli, Nimisha Verma

ODAA1

Amateur astronomy has evolved dramatically over recent years. A motivated amateur, with his/her backyard instrument and available software is nowadays capable of getting high-resolution planetary images in different wavelengths (better than many professional observatories could achieve 20 years ago). Topics well covered by amateur astronomers include: high-resolution imaging of solar system planets, high-precision photometry of stellar occultations by minor objects and giant planets' atmospheres, satellites' mutual phenomena and high-precision photometry of exoplanet transits. Additionally amateurs use dedicated all-sky cameras or radio-antennae to provide continuous meteor-detection coverage of the sky near their location and they start to contribute to spectroscopic studies of solar system objects.

Hundreds of regular observers are sharing their work providing very valuable data to professional astronomers. This is very valuable at a time when professional astronomers face increasing competition accessing observational resources. Additionally, networks of amateur observers can react at very short notice when triggered by a new event occurring on a solar system object requiring observations, or can contribute to a global observation campaign along with professional telescopes.

Moreover, some experienced amateur astronomers use advanced methods for analysing their data meeting the requirements of professional researchers, thereby facilitating regular and close collaboration with professionals. Often this leads to publication of results in peer-reviewed scientific journals. Examples include planetary meteorology of Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune or Venus; meteoroid or bolide impacts on Jupiter; asteroid studies, cometary or exoplanet research.

Space missions also sollicitate amateur astronomers support. For example, to understand the atmospheric dynamics of the planet at the time of Juno flybys, NASA collaborates with amateur astronomers observing the Giant Planet. It showcases an exciting opportunity for amateurs to provide an unique dataset that is used to plan the high-resolution observations from JunoCam and that advances our knowledge of the Giant planet Jupiter. Contribution of amateurs range from their own images to Junocam images processing and support on selecting by vote the feature to be observed during the flybys. Other probes like Ariel or Lucy sollicitate amateur astronomers observation to support exoplanets and small bodies science.

This session will showcase results from amateur astronomers, working either by themselves or in collaboration with members of the professional community. In addition, members from both communities will be invited to share their experiences of pro-am partnerships and offer suggestions on how these should evolve in the future.

Convener: Marc Delcroix | Co-conveners: Günther Wuchterl, Filip Walter, Edyta Podlewska-Gaca, Ricardo Hueso, Florence Libotte, John Rogers
Orals
| Tue, 10 Sep, 08:30–10:00 (CEST)|Room Saturn (Hörsaal B)
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 10 Sep, 14:30–16:00 (CEST) | Display Tue, 10 Sep, 08:30–19:00
Orals |
Tue, 08:30
Tue, 14:30
ODAA3

The needs and practice of science communication have shifted dramatically in the past ~decade, mainly due to the increased use of social media communication channels, accompanied with somewhat diminishing role of traditional sci-comm media approaches, and recently also generative AI. The COVID19 pandemic exposed a lot of weaknesses of current science communication, especially not addressing a wider “polluted information system”, helping people navigate it to reach reliable evidence-based information and engaging in participatory rather than only top-down communication.

While the same issues are less pressing from the point of view of planetary science, they are relevant for the community as well, since discoveries in the Earth’s history and climate, exoplanet science, astrobiology and other fields can end up heavily distorted in the current information ecosystem. Increased engagement with planetary science is important not only for its own sake and because of the passion for science that we share, but also for practical reasons such as raising the next generation of scientists, teaching the scientific method and inquiry, promoting overall critical thinking and helping people understand issues such as climate change and its impacts.

Rather than parceling the central question of science communication for the 21st century into individual topics such as sci-comm on social media, role of books in current sci-comm, AI art in sci-comm, risks and benefits of AI in sci-comm, citizen science involvement for sci-comm, limiting misinformation (especially in high-interest areas for the public, such as astrobiology or exoplanets) etc., we decided to invite you to share your activities, insights, experience and perspectives connecting to the underlying key question of how to use all these approaches in synergy, effectively share scientific discoveries and increase public interest and participation in science in the coming years.

Orals
| Tue, 10 Sep, 10:30–12:00 (CEST)|Room Saturn (Hörsaal B)
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 10 Sep, 14:30–16:00 (CEST) | Display Tue, 10 Sep, 08:30–19:00
Orals |
Tue, 10:30
Tue, 14:30
ODAA4

The benefits of diversity and inclusiveness in the scientific community are incontrovertible. Following the success of previous years, this session aims to foster debate within the planetary sciences community about the reasons behind the under-representation of different groups (gender, cultural, ethnic origin, and national) and best practices to make the research environment more inclusive identifying and addressing barriers to equality.

We invite abstracts focusing on under-representation (gender, cultural, ethnic origin, and nationality biases) supported by statistics and data; outreach and education activities to reach broad and diverse audiences, best practices to support inclusiveness; and case studies on mentoring and bias-concerned activities.

Orals
| Wed, 11 Sep, 16:30–18:00 (CEST)|Room Saturn (Hörsaal B)
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 11 Sep, 14:30–16:00 (CEST) | Display Wed, 11 Sep, 08:30–19:00
Orals |
Wed, 16:30
Wed, 14:30
ODAA6

The rapid evolution of augmented reality, virtual reality, 3D visualisation tools, and digital platforms has revolutionized outreach and dissemination activities in the field of planetary sciences. These innovative technologies offer immersive experiences that allow individuals to explore different environments from unprecedented perspectives. Moreover, they serve as engaging and accessible tools for individuals of all ages, fostering interactive learning experiences and skills development.
In this session, we invite participants to share their experiences and insights into leveraging virtual realities for planetary sciences outreach. Through case studies and examples, we will explore the diverse applications of these technologies, from designing immersive environments to facilitating skills development and training initiatives. Additionally, we will address challenges and opportunities related to intuitiveness, inclusiveness, and the future directions of virtual reality in outreach efforts.

Orals
| Fri, 13 Sep, 08:30–10:00 (CEST)|Room Neptune (Hörsaal D)
Posters
| Attendance Fri, 13 Sep, 10:30–12:00 (CEST) | Display Fri, 13 Sep, 08:30–19:00
Orals |
Fri, 08:30
Fri, 10:30
ODAA7

Knowledge creation is a collaborative process including synergies between different disciplines, communities and stakeholders. The framework of open science is also connected to the involvement of people outside academia, such as amateur societies, school students, corporate partners etc. Open science has a variety of aspects and applications. What are the efforts done in the field of planetary sciences to establish and increase openness? To what degree planetary science researchers and practitioners endeavour accessibility within the various communities - academics and non-academics? During this session these and other relevant questions will be addressed through the presentation of open planetary science projects, tools, data and platforms. Furthermore, the current status and the potential for future efforts towards an open and public planetary science scheme will be discussed. Building upon the success of the session in the previous years, planetary scientists, researchers and other stakeholders are welcome to present new projects and the developments of previous ones, in the context of promoting open & public science.

Co-organized by MITM
Orals
| Thu, 12 Sep, 16:30–18:00 (CEST)|Room Sun (Auditorium)
Posters
| Attendance Thu, 12 Sep, 10:30–12:00 (CEST) | Display Thu, 12 Sep, 08:30–19:30
Orals |
Thu, 16:30
Thu, 10:30
MITM3

Artificial intelligence (AI) refers to the development of computer software capable of performing tasks that would typically require human intelligence. Machine learning (ML) is a branch of computer science that explores algorithms that can learn from data. It is primarily divided into supervised learning, where the algorithm is presented with examples of labeled entries and the goal is to learn a general rule that maps inputs to outputs, and unsupervised learning, where no label is provided to the learning algorithm, allowing it to autonomously identify structures. Deep learning is a branch of machine learning based on multiple layers of artificial neural networks, which are computing systems inspired by the biological neural networks found in animal brains. This session aims to provide a forum for discussing recent advancements in the applications of AI and ML to planetary science.

Co-organized by TP/SB/ODAA
Orals
| Tue, 10 Sep, 16:30–18:00 (CEST)|Room Saturn (Hörsaal B), Wed, 11 Sep, 08:30–12:00 (CEST)|Room Saturn (Hörsaal B)
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 10 Sep, 10:30–12:00 (CEST) | Display Tue, 10 Sep, 08:30–19:00
Orals |
Tue, 16:30
Tue, 10:30
SB1

More than ten thousand tons of extraterrestrial objects, ranging in size from a few microns to tens of meters in diameter, enter Earth’s atmosphere annually. A small fraction of these objects yields free samples of extraterrestrial matter—meteorites—for laboratory study. The majority of these objects burn up or ablate completely in the Earth’s atmosphere, appearing as visible meteors in the night sky. By recording meteor activity and modeling the process of ablation, we can directly measure the flux of small planetary impactors. This provides ground truth for estimating present cratering rates and planetary surface ages.

The rapid advancement of observational and modeling techniques has elevated meteor science to one of the primary avenues for investigating the nature and origin of interplanetary matter and its parent bodies. This session aims to serve as a platform for presenting fundamental results and innovative concepts in this field, while also informing the broader planetary science community about the interdisciplinary impact of ongoing and future research efforts.

Co-organized by TP/ODAA
Convener: Hervé Lamy | Co-conveners: Maria Gritsevich, Eloy Peña-Asensio
Orals
| Fri, 13 Sep, 14:30–18:00 (CEST)|Room Sun (Auditorium)
Posters
| Attendance Fri, 13 Sep, 10:30–12:00 (CEST) | Display Fri, 13 Sep, 08:30–19:00
Orals |
Fri, 14:30
Fri, 10:30