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OS2.1

Open Session on Coastal and Shelf Seas
Conveners: Johan van der Molen , Huib E. de Swart , Georgy Shapiro 
Oral Programme
 / Mon, 04 Apr, 08:30–12:00  / 13:30–15:00  / Room 11
Poster Programme
 / Attendance Mon, 04 Apr, 17:30–19:00  / Display Mon, 04 Apr, 08:00–19:30  / Halls X/Y
<table class="mo_scheduling_string" style="border-collapse: collapse; clear:left;"><tr><td style="vertical-align: top;"><span class="apl_addon_standard_action_link" style="text-decoration: none;">Poster Summaries & Discussions</span>:&nbsp;<a href="https://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2011/session/8535" target="_blank" title="Open PSD75 Details" style="clear:left;">PSD75</a> &nbsp;/ <span class="mo_scheduling_string_time">Mon, 04 Apr, 16:30</span><span class="mo_scheduling_string_time">&ndash;17:15</span> &nbsp;/ <span class="mo_scheduling_string_place" title=""></span> &nbsp;</td></tr></table>
Contributions are invited on innovative observational, theoretical, experimental and modelling studies concerning subaquaeous physical processes in estuaries, coastal seas and shelf seas. Processes can include hydrodynamics (e.g., waves, tides, currents, eddies, shelf edge exchanges), transport of material (e.g., sediments, contaminants, nutrients), and morphodynamics (e.g., evolution of bed forms, banks or basin shape). Study areas are envisaged between the base of the shelf break and the seaward limit of the surf zone. Scales of primary interest are basin scale down to about a hundred metres. However, contributions on processes outside these geographical limits, or of smaller scales (e.g., turbulence, ripples) will be considered where they significantly influence processes within these limits. Equally, contributions on non-physical or non-marine processes (e.g., climate dynamics, biogeochemistry, man-made structures) will be considered where they significantly influence, or are significantly influenced by, the processes aimed at in this session. Two subsessions are envisaged. The first will be devoted to morphodynamics, focussing in particular on physical interactions between co-evolving hydrodynamics, sediment transport and sea-bed topography. The second will be devoted to physical and biogeochemical processes associated with strong topographical features, such as dense water cascades, overflows, shelf-edge exchange processes, and internal waves.