Please note that this session was withdrawn and is no longer available in the respective programme. This withdrawal might have been the result of a merge with another session.

BG2.30

Soil erosion (by water and wind) has been accelerating significantly since the start of agriculture, mobilizing not only large amounts of carbon but also nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus. Erosion-induced lateral fluxes of carbon and nutrients alter soil fertility which affects plant productivity and carbon sequestration potential of ecosystems. In addition, the export of nutrients from agricultural lands to aquatic systems can lead to eutrophication with negative impacts on ecosystem functioning. The impacts of soil erosion on the biogeochemical cycles are largely unquantified at regional and global scales and commonly omitted in land surface models. This session focusses on empirical and modelling studies that provide novel methods or data to quantify erosion-induced lateral transfers of carbon and nutrients and their impacts at large spatial scales.

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Convener: Victoria Naipal  | Co-conveners: Daniel Goll , Ronny Lauerwald 
Soil erosion (by water and wind) has been accelerating significantly since the start of agriculture, mobilizing not only large amounts of carbon but also nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus. Erosion-induced lateral fluxes of carbon and nutrients alter soil fertility which affects plant productivity and carbon sequestration potential of ecosystems. In addition, the export of nutrients from agricultural lands to aquatic systems can lead to eutrophication with negative impacts on ecosystem functioning. The impacts of soil erosion on the biogeochemical cycles are largely unquantified at regional and global scales and commonly omitted in land surface models. This session focusses on empirical and modelling studies that provide novel methods or data to quantify erosion-induced lateral transfers of carbon and nutrients and their impacts at large spatial scales.