TM19

Geosciences are more than ever solicited in their full interdisciplinarity to meet the urgent need to make our cities climate neutral and proof, smart, safe, resilient, sustainable, inclusive, enjoyable, and to increase well-being and health.

This is testified by a series of important international agreements, including the United Nations Sustainable Development Program for 2030, COP21 and the EU Amsterdam Pact. The emergence of large city networks (RC100, ICLEI, C40) also underscores the urgency of achieving these agreements goals. The challenge is to drastically change the interactions between cities and their geophysical environment: to shift from short-term resource and risk management to a wise environmental monitoring over a wide range of space-time scales and to develop integrative responses to both geophysical changes and the ongoing urbanisation.

Is the community of geosciences involved enough? How to move forward?

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Convener: Daniel Schertzer | Co-conveners: Klaus Fraedrich, Stefano Tinti
Thu, 11 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room 1.85
Geosciences are more than ever solicited in their full interdisciplinarity to meet the urgent need to make our cities climate neutral and proof, smart, safe, resilient, sustainable, inclusive, enjoyable, and to increase well-being and health.

This is testified by a series of important international agreements, including the United Nations Sustainable Development Program for 2030, COP21 and the EU Amsterdam Pact. The emergence of large city networks (RC100, ICLEI, C40) also underscores the urgency of achieving these agreements goals. The challenge is to drastically change the interactions between cities and their geophysical environment: to shift from short-term resource and risk management to a wise environmental monitoring over a wide range of space-time scales and to develop integrative responses to both geophysical changes and the ongoing urbanisation.

Is the community of geosciences involved enough? How to move forward?