EGU2020-1556, updated on 12 Jun 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu2020-1556
EGU General Assembly 2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Investigation of different anaerobic respiratory pathways and their impacts on the release ratio of DIC/alkalinity at selected North Sea regions

Nele Treblin, Michael E. Böttcher, Tristan Zimmermann, Daniel Pröfrock, Mona Norbisrath, Bryce van Dam, and Helmuth Thomas
Nele Treblin et al.
  • Helmholtz Center Geesthacht, Institute for Coastal Research, Germany (nele.treblin@hzg.de)

Investigation of different anaerobic respiratory pathways and their impacts on the release ratio of DIC/alkalinity at selected North Sea regions

Tentative authors: Nele Treblin1,2, Michael E. Böttcher3, Tristan Zimmermann1, Daniel Pröfrock1, Mona Norbisrath1, Bryce van Dam1, Helmuth Thomas1

1Institute for Coastal Research, Helmholtz Center Geesthacht

2Alfred-Wegener-Institute Helmholtz Center for Polar and Marine Research

3Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research Warnemünde

 

Coastal sediments play a crucial role in carbon metabolism, which decreases with increasing distance from the shoreline. The North Sea, a NW European shelf sea, represents a relatively shallow, well-ventilated (on annual timescales) system, connected to the Baltic Sea and the North Atlantic. Especially the southern part of the North Sea receives a large amount of organic matter (OM), both from riverine input and internal North Sea sources. After the depletion of oxygen due to aerobic OM respiration, anaerobic metabolic activities become dominant in the sediment. In the absence of oxygen, electron acceptors, such as NO3-, Fe3+, Mn4+ and SO42-, facilitate not only the release of respired CO2, but also of alkalinity, furthermore enhanced by potential dissolution of sedimentary carbonates. Therefore, under these conditions, benthic-pelagic coupling may impact on the potential to absorb CO2 from the atmosphere.

To investigate the described processes, porewater and sediment samples, collected from six different stations in the German Bight (North Sea) during the RV Heincke cruise HE541 in September 2019, have been analyzed for their vertical concentration profiles of nutrients, various trace metals, sulfur, DIC and alkalinity.

Benthic oxic and anoxic zones have been identified based on the vertical concentration gradients. Furthermore, alkalinity and DIC are set in relation to anaerobic metabolic activities. Finally, active reworking and ventilation becomes pivotal in areas such as the North Sea. Thus, the influence of bioturbation on anaerobic respiration is also considered.

How to cite: Treblin, N., Böttcher, M. E., Zimmermann, T., Pröfrock, D., Norbisrath, M., van Dam, B., and Thomas, H.: Investigation of different anaerobic respiratory pathways and their impacts on the release ratio of DIC/alkalinity at selected North Sea regions, EGU General Assembly 2020, Online, 4–8 May 2020, EGU2020-1556, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu2020-1556, 2019