Union-wide
Inter- and Transdisciplinary Sessions
Disciplinary sessions AS–GM
Disciplinary sessions GMPV–TS

Session programme

EOS7

EOS – Education and Outreach Sessions

Programme group chairs: Mioara Mandea, Chris King

EOS7 – Teaching topics

EOS7.1

In the session we would like to explore and discuss concrete experimental subjects which satisfy the following points;
1: easy to start and easy to finish without any high barrier in practice.
2: but not easy to understand, requiring deep thinking. They should contain enigmas.
3: having many doors open to higher level understandings
The subjects cover all the research fields in earth & planetary sciences. The only concern is to utilize our hands and brain in laboratory experiments. These simple but profound experiments could be useful as a brain-stimulating tool in many situations such as perspective research explorations for young scientists, intriguing experiments in the freshman course at universities and inspiring classroom experiments at high schools. We would like to call for submissions from serious researchers to wrap your scientific results in kitchen earth science style as well as from eager teachers with your experience at the classrooms.
This is a new session based on the joint works in JPGU’s accumulations of 10 years kitchen earth science and active discussions about the concept of GIFT in EGU.

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Co-sponsored by JpGU
Convener: Kei Kurita | Co-convener: Francesca Funiciello
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
ITS4.2/ESSI4.2

All areas in the Earth sciences face the same problem of dealing with larger and more complex data sets that need to be analyzed, visualized and understood. Depending on the application domain and the specific scientific questions to be solved, different visualization strategies and techniques have to be applied. Yet, how we communicate those complex data sets, and the effect that visualization strategies and choices have on different (expert and non-expert) audiences as well as decision-makers remains an under-researched area of interest. For this "PICO only" session, we not only invite submissions that demonstrate how to create effective and efficient visualizations for complex and large earth science data sets but also those that discuss possibilities and challenges we face in the communication and tailoring of such complex data to different users/ audiences. Submissions are encouraged from all geoscientific areas that either show best practices or state of the art in earth science data visualization or demonstrate efficient techniques that allow an intuitive interaction with large data sets. In addition, we would like to encourage studies that integrate thematic and methodological insights from fields such as for example risk communication more effectively into the visualization of complex data. Presentations will be given as PICO (Presenting Interactive COntent) on large interactive touch screens. This session is supported by ESiWACE2. ESiWACE2 has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under grant agreement No 823988.

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Co-organized by EOS7/CL5/GD10/GM2
Convener: Niklas Röber | Co-conveners: Michael Böttinger, Joseph Daron, Susanne Lorenz
Displays
| Attendance Tue, 05 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
SSS12.9

Soils are complex, dynamic systems that are essential to support life on earth. Healthy soils provide food security, regulate the climate and play a vital role in controlling the flow of pollutants into the wider environment. Soils also contain a vast reservoir of genetic material in soil microbes, with potential to inspire future technological advances. However, soils are under threat, as harmful management practices and climate change are altering organic matter levels and microbial composition, and increasing salinisation, contamination and erosion rates. Through an array of approaches, soil scientists explore soil processes and systems, and characterise soil communities and resources in order to understand changes in our soils. We aim to celebrate the power of the soil in a wide-ranging session organised by a cohort of early career researchers, containing voices from throughout the soil science community. We believe that soil holds the key to solving some of the global environmental challenges in achieving a sustainable future by 2050. By bringing together a wide variety of interests and approaches in one place, we hope to foster interdisciplinary connections and solutions to challenges in soil science.

Public information:
We would like to invite authors and attendees to a post-session "coffee meeting" for a more general discussion of the fascinating research and topics on display today. The session will take place on Zoom and we will start this at 10:45 Vienna time, but the channel will be open from 10:30. We do hope you will join us and look forward to seeing you there! Zoom details will be release in the live chat.

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Co-organized by EOS7
Convener: Jessica PottsECSECS | Co-conveners: John BealeECSECS, Harry HarveyECSECS, Corina LeesECSECS, Phil Haygarth
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
SSS12.7

The editors of Land Degradation and Development Currently, several aspects of land degradation and resilience are at the centre of hot debates: How much do no-till technologies contribute to sustainable soil management? Can reclaimed land be converted to arable land? Do we have strong evidence of the land restoration potential of regenerative agriculture? Does land degradation lead to large carbon storage in sediment, hence a feedback on global warming? What is the optimal level of soil organic matter? Is biochar addition enhancing or curbing soil erosion? Does the revival of ancient land management techniques induce soil erosion? Can 137Cs efficiently be used to measure soil-loss rates? Researchers will present evidence and defend their opinion concerning either side of these and other ongoing debates. After debating, the authors will be invited to publish their (opinion) papers in a special issue of “Land Degradation and Development”. This approach will direct auditors and readers to evidence that contributes to the debates. The session will provide suggestions on how the research community may assist in resolving such very important questions of land and soil degradation.

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Co-organized by EOS7
Convener: Jan Nyssen | Co-conveners: Steff Clements, Jan Frouz, Yakov Kuzyakov, Vanessa Wong
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 08:30–12:30 (CEST), Attendance Fri, 08 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
SSS11.2

Soils are formed through complex processes often resulting in a highly heterogeneous mixture of organic and mineral phases, whose analysis requires structural insight across several length scales. Therefore, the choice of analysis methods for investigation of soil chemical, biochemical and physical properties play very important role in the progress of soil science. New research approaches, such as “lab on phone” that has appeared in scientific literature during the last few years, and which specifies the use of smartphones as analytical instruments in labs and also for field experiments, could serve as easily available soil analysis method and as means to increase involvement of the society to the soil science research. On the other hand, the unceasing developments in advanced synchrotron based analytical techniques continue to break frontiers in how questions on soil biogeochemistry and structure can be addressed, particularly at micro- and nano-scales.

This session will explore the diverse possibilities offered by various analytical techniques: from advanced synchrotron based ones, to the “lab on phone”, ICP-MS, GC-MS, HPLC-MS, TGA-MS, FTIR, fluorescence and others, in the analysis of soils.

Public information:
New techniques are a prerequisite to widen the scope of knowledge, or to simplify and speed up known procedures

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Co-organized by EOS7
Convener: Tonu Tonutare | Co-conveners: Luis Carlos Colocho HurtarteECSECS, Manfred Sager, Viia Lepane, Milda PucetaiteECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
SSS11.5

A well-designed experiment is a crucial methodology in Soil Science, Geomorphology and Hydrology.
Depending on the specific research topic, a great variety of tempo-spatial scales is addressed.
From raindrop impact and single particle detachment to the shaping of landscapes: experiments are designed and conducted to illustrate problems, clarify research questions, develop and test hypotheses, generate data and deepen process understanding.
Every step involved in design, construction, conduction, processing and interpretation of experiments and experimental data might be a challenge on itself, and discussions within the community can be a substantial and fruitful component for both, researchers and teachers.
This PICO session offers a forum for experimentalists, teachers, students and enthusiasts.
We invite you to present your work, your questions, your results and your method, to meet, to discuss, to exchange ideas and to consider old and new approaches.
Join the experimentalists!

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Co-organized by EOS7
Convener: Thomas Iserloh | Co-conveners: Miriam MarzenECSECS, Jorge Isidoro, Ian Pattison, Wolfgang FisterECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
EOS7.10

Good scientific practice requires research results to be reproducible, experiments to be repeatable and methods to be reusable. This is a particular challenge for hydrological research, as scientific insights are often drawn from analysis of heterogeneous data sets comprising many different sources and based on a large variety of numerical models. The available data sets are becoming more complex and constantly superseded by new, improved releases. Similarly, new models and computational tools keep emerging and many are available in different versions and programming languages, with a large variability in the quality of the documentation. Moreover, how data and models are linked together towards scientific output is very rarely documented in a reproducible way. As a result, very few published results in hydrology are reproducible for the general reader.
A debate on good scientific practice is underway, while technological developments accelerate progress towards open and reproducible science. This session aims to advance this debate on open science, collect innovative ways of engaging in open science and showcase examples. It will include new scientific insights enabled by open science and new (combinations of) open science approaches with a documented potential to make hydrological research more open, accessible, reproducible and reusable.

This session should advance the discussion on open and reproducible science, highlight its advantages and also provide the means to bring this into practice. We strongly believe we should focus on the entire scientific process, instead of the results alone, obtained in a currently still rather fragmented way.

This session is organized in line with other Open Science efforts, such as FAIR Your Science.

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Co-organized by HS1.2
Convener: Remko C. Nijzink | Co-conveners: Niels Drost, Francesca Pianosi, Stan Schymanski
Displays
| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
NH9.11

This session addresses knowledge exchange between researchers, the public, policy makers, and practitioners about natural hazards. Although we welcome all contributions in this topic, we are particularly interested in: (i) The communication (by scientists, engineers, the press, civil protection, government agencies, and a multitude other agencies) of natural hazards risk and uncertainty to the general public and other government officials; (ii) Approaches that address barriers and bridges in the science-policy-practice interface that hinder and support application of hazard-related knowledge; (iii) The teaching of natural hazards to university and lower-level students, using innovative techniques to promote understanding. We also are specifically interested in distance education courses on themes related to hazard and risk assessment, and disaster risk management, and in programmes for training in developing countries. We therefore solicit abstracts, particularly dynamic posters, on all aspects of how we communicate and educate the better understanding of natural hazards. We plan on having a PICO session to ensure a lively combination of discussion and poster presentation.

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Co-organized by EOS7/GM12/HS13/SM3
Convener: Joel GillECSECS | Co-conveners: Bruce D. Malamud, Alison SneddonECSECS, Adam D. Switzer, Faith TaylorECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)