Union-wide
Inter- and Transdisciplinary Sessions
Disciplinary sessions AS–GM
Disciplinary sessions GMPV–TS

Session programme

TS

TS – Tectonics & Structural Geology

DM22
Convener: Claudio Rosenberg
Wed, 06 May, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)

TS1 – General themes in Tectonics and Structural Geology

TS1.1

Temperature is a critical parameter in sedimentary basin evolution. Its distribution through time and space highly contributes to address complex geodynamic topics in different settings through realistic thermal history reconstructions. Conventional thermal modeling constraints derived from the inorganic and organic fraction of sedimentary rocks (vitrinite %Ro, apatite fission-tracks, fluid inclusions, etc.) can be affected by important limitations.
Moreover, fluids circulation in fault zones and sediments is often disregarded. In the last years new modelling approaches, innovative thermo-chronology proxies (carbonate clumped isotopes thermometry coupled with laser ablation U-Pb chronometry) as well as Raman and FT-IR on organic matter and biomarker studies have been widely used to overcome these pitfalls. Aim of the session is to provide a worldwide panorama on sedimentary basins whose geodynamic evolution has been constrained by merging conventional and brand-new calibration techniques and thermal modelling approaches. Contributions on different scale mechanisms, also dealing with uncertainties of fluids and technique validation are warmly welcome and would allow for discussion on technique development and presentation of new pilot data.

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Co-organized by GD4/SSP1
Convener: Andrea SchitoECSECS | Co-conveners: Sveva Corrado, Marta Gasparrini, David Muirhead, Silvia Omodeo SalèECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
EOS2.1

Structural geology and tectonics are two of the most visual subjects in geosciences, and lectures on the subjects form the core of curricula at geology departments at universities around the world. New teaching styles and technologies have found their way into class room and field courses focusing on Structural geology and tectonic, such as Blackboard LEARN, flipped class rooms, classroom response systems, digital mapping on tablets, the use of drones, and virtual outcrops. We invite researchers and lecturers to present their original and innovative ideas, strategies and tools regarding teaching Structural Geology and Tectonics. Co-organized with TS.

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Co-organized by TS1
Convener: Hans de Bresser | Co-conveners: Florian Fusseis, Janos Urai
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)

TS2 – Deformation mechanisms and rheology

TS2.3

This session concerns about the interrelation between microstructures and geologic processes. One the one hand, microstructures (fabrics, textures, grain sizes, shapes, etc) can be used to identify or quantify, e.g., deformation, metamorphic, magmatic or diagenetic phenomena (to name a few). On the other hand, physical properties of geo-materials are governed by their microstructure, hence predicting a materials property is greatly enhanced by understanding of how certain processes result in a specific microstructure.

All these mechanisms are likely to cause modification on the rheological, elastic, and thermal properties of these rocks, providing key information on the evolution of the lithosphere.
In this session, we invite contributions from field observations, laboratory experiments, and numerical modelling that relate microstructures to rheology, strain localization or mineral reactions, that use microstructures to tackle general problems in structural, metamorphic, magmatic or economic geology as well as studies quantifying physical and mechanical properties of rocks based on their microstructural and textural properties using well established or novel methods.

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Co-organized by EMRP1/GD8/GMPV1
Convener: Rüdiger Kilian | Co-conveners: Sina MartiECSECS, Luiz F. G. Morales, Michael Stipp
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
TS2.5

The deformation energy budget describes how energy is stored and consumed within crustal systems. Energy stored as uplift against gravity, off-fault deformation and/or mineralogic changes can be released in the creation of new fractures, frictional heating along faults and/or radiated seismic energy. Innovative field measurements, numerical modeling and experimental approaches are providing new constraints on the energy budget within deforming crustal systems. The energy budget framework allows comparison of the energetic importance of diverse deformational processes operating in crustal systems. This framework enables tracking the evolution of the energy budget throughout time, and comparing energy budget partitioning in any tectonic system as individual fault segments propagate, interact and perhaps link. Moreover, the energy budget framework governs the rupture style and slip distribution during an individual earthquake, and is key in understanding multi-fault ruptures. Evidence suggests that new faults develop in order to optimize the overall efficiency of the system. Thus, constraining which processes dominate the budget in various tectonic systems and moments in time may help predict the timing and geometry of fault and rupture propagation and interaction. For this session, we encourage contributions that provide estimates of the evolving components of the energy budget using diverse methods, including numerical models, scaled physical analog experiments, deformation experiments on natural rock, and geophysical and field observations. Interdisciplinary work that combines several of these techniques are particularly encouraged.

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Co-organized by EMRP1
Convener: Jessica McBeckECSECS | Co-conveners: Franciscus AbenECSECS, Michele Cooke, Kurama OkuboECSECS, Francois PasselegueECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
GMPV6.1

Reactions between fluids and rocks have a fundamental impact on many of the natural and geo-engineering processes in crustal settings. Examples of such natural processes are localization of deformation, earthquake nucleation caused by high pressure fluid pulses, as well as metamorphic reactions and rheological weakening triggered by fluid flow, metasomatism and fluid-mediated mass transport. Moreover, the efficiency of many geo-engineering processes is partly dependent on fluid-rock interactions, such as hydraulic fracturing, geothermal energy recovery, CO2 storage and wastewater injection. All our observations in the rock record are the end-product of all metamorphic, metasomatic and deformation changes that occurred during the interaction with fluid. Therefore, to investigate and understand these complex and interconnected processes, it is required to merge knowledge and techniques deriving from several disciplines of the geosciences.
We invite multidisciplinary contributions that investigate fluid-rock interactions throughout the entire breadth of the topic, using fieldwork, microstructural and petrographic analyses, geochemistry, experimental rock mechanics, thermodynamic modeling and numerical modeling.

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Co-organized by TS2
Convener: Francesco GiuntoliECSECS | Co-conveners: Anne PluymakersECSECS, Oliver Plümper
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
GMPV7.1

From the Archean to the present, the dynamic evolution of the lithosphere is preserved in the metamorphic rock record. Each piece of evidence on mineral reactions, deformation and fluid-rock interaction helps to reconstruct the puzzle of lithospheric tectonics in all its complexity. Analytical and conceptual innovations in petrology, geochemistry, chronology, structural analysis and thermodynamic/thermomechanical modelling continue to improve our ability to read the metamorphic rock record and open new avenues for future development.

This session will highlight research in integrated metamorphic petrology and its application to solid earth behaviour in orogens, subduction zones and cratons throughout geological time. We welcome contributions across the breadth of this field—from petrology, (petro-)chronology, trace-element and isotope geochemistry to microstructures, modelling and geodynamics—with a focus on metamorphic and metasomatic processes that shape the lithosphere across a range of scales.

Invited speakers: Sarah Incel (University of Oslo), Richard Palin (University of Oxford) 

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Co-organized by GD4/TS2
Convener: Matthijs Smit | Co-conveners: Daniela Rubatto, Tom Raimondo, Lucie Tajcmanova, Francesca PiccoliECSECS, José Alberto Padrón-Navarta, Carla TiraboschiECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
GD9.1

In the Plate Tectonics theory, Earth’s lithosphere is described as a rigid outermost shell deforming over long timescales along narrow boundaries, that play a central role in our Planet’s thermal and dynamic evolution. Understanding the modalities of strain localization in the lithosphere and its failure are therefore essential to describe the formation and evolution of plate boundaries, fault zones and other mechanical heterogeneities. This requires knowledge of localization processes at both micro- and macro-physical scales, the analysis of their dynamics over various time scales, and involves complementary inputs from geological and seismic observations, laboratory experiments and numerical and analog modeling.
We welcome multidisciplinary contributions that will collaboratively help to build a unified view on the dynamical evolution of lithospheric localization processes. Example topics include but are certainly not limited to the study of variations in lithospheric properties deduced from mineralogical, petrological or geological data, and of the implication of lithospheric anomalies on the dynamics of fault zones and the formation and evolution of plate margins in nature or in models.

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Co-organized by TS2
Convener: Lukas FuchsECSECS | Co-conveners: Maelis ArnouldECSECS, Whitney Behr, Eline Le Breton
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)

TS3 – Fluid flow and deformation, mutual interactions

TS3.4

Geophysical data demonstrate elevated seismic activity in subduction zones. Here dehydration and fluid pressure cycling as a function of increasing compaction and metamorphic grade are closely linked to deformation over a multitude of spatial and time scales. The highly anisotropic and initially fluid saturated marine sediments and altered oceanic crust dehydrate, while being incorporated into the accretionary wedge and subducted under the upper plate. Under high tectonic stresses, fluid overpressure eventually results in mechanical instabilities, promoting either hydrofracturing or ductile failure giving way for fluids to circulate. Collection of these fluids at the micron-scale and propagation along pathways up to the deca-kilometre scale are probably in charge for phenomena such as episodic tremor and slow slip. Increasing evidence from geophysical and seismic studies suggest that accumulation of slow slip events and fluids may even trigger devastating high-energy megathrust earthquakes. Quantitative understanding about (i) the release of fluids from their host rocks, (ii) the effect of localisation of both fluid flow and deformation and (iii) their effect on seismic activity are therefore crucial to understand the complex feedback processes. This system can only be fully understood by a close collaboration between experts from structural geology, metamorphic petrology and geophysics. In this interdisciplinary session, we therefore invite contributions from natural, experimental- and numerical modelling-based studies focussing on both exhumed (paleo) and active subduction zones.

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Co-organized by GMPV2/SM6
Convener: Ismay Vénice AkkerECSECS | Co-conveners: Francesco GiuntoliECSECS, Marco Herwegh, Christoph Schrank, Emily Warren-Smith
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
TS3.5

Fractures and faults are common tectonic features within shallowly deformed rocks. Fracture networks play a fundamental role in fluid migration. Understanding the mechanical and chronological development of fracture networks is therefore key for tectonic studies as well as for resources exploration and waste repositories studies.
Fractures and faults are witnesses of the medium history, resulting from processes controlled by physical forces and/or chemical potential. A better understanding of the parameters that control fracture complexity in rocks will lead to new tools for reconstructing crustal-scale processes such as fluid flow and fluid-rock interactions, paleostress evolution and earthquake tectonics. However, the great challenge is the understanding of dynamic feedbacks between fluid flow, permeability rise/fall, chemical reactions and rock failure. Fluid sources, fluid flow and fluid-rock interactions vary spatially and temporally as a function of basin and reservoir structural evolution, altering the physical/mechanical properties of fractures and host rocks.
Fractures form at all stages of rock history, from early diagenesis/burial to major deformation events. Building realistic conceptual and predictive models of fracture types and occurrence therefore requires recognition of fractures formed prior to, and during deformation events. A blind spot in fracture analysis has been for long the lack of constraints on the absolute timing of brittle failure and structural diagenesis. Recent progress in absolute dating of calcite cements/coatings of veins/faults has proven the relevance of meso-structures to regional structural evolution, allowing for a refined tectonic history. New steps forward include a better appraisal of the rate of development and lifetime of individual fracture and fracture sets, and of the timing and rate of fluid flow in fractured rocks.
This session aims at bringing together scientists working in the field, in the lab, and on simulations to foster discussion towards improving our understanding of (1) the mechanics, occurrence, timing and stress history of fractures in upper crustal rocks, and (2) the role fracture networks play on subsurface fluid flow. We welcome contributions from all fields, including structural geology, mechanics, isotope geochemistry, and hydrogeology that aim at comprehending the development of fracture systems in time and space and their co-evolution with fluid flow in a variety of geological settings.

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Co-organized by GMPV6
Convener: Olivier Lacombe | Co-conveners: Stefano Tavani, Juliette Lamarche, Fabrizio Agosta, Fabrizio Balsamo, Alberto CeccatoECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
ERE6.3

Fractures are discontinuities in rocks that are present in almost all geological settings and at any scale. They may represent small-scale fissures or build up large scale faults. Fractures are extreme forms of heterogeneities, often with a small extension but huge impact.
The presence of fractures modifies the bulk physical properties of the original media by many orders of magnitudes, and they often introduce a strongly nonlinear behavior. This refers in particular to the mechanical properties via reduction of strength and stiffness. Fractures also provide the main flow and transport pathways in hard rock aquifers, dominating over the permeability of the rock matrix, as well as creating anisotropic flow fields and transport. Understanding their hydraulic and mechanical properties of fractures and fracture networks thus are crucial for predicting the movement of any fluid such as of water, air, hydrocarbons, or CO2. Consequently, fractures are of great importance in various disciplines such as hydrogeology, hydrocarbon reservoir management, and geothermal reservoir engineering.
The geologist toolbox to explore and model fractured rocks is getting more and more extended. This session is dedicated to novel ideas and concepts on treating the challenges related to the generic understanding, the characterization and the modelling of fractured geological media.
Contributions are welcome from the following topics
• Exploration methods for mechanical and/or hydraulic characterization of fractured media
• Structural construction of fractured media by deterministic or stochastic approaches,
• Representation of static hydraulic and/or mechanical characteristics of fractured media involving continuous or discontinuous methods,
• Simulation of dynamic processes and the hydraulic and/or mechanical behavior of fractured media,
• Theoretical studies and field applications in fractured geological formations,
• Concepts of accounting for fractured properties specifically in groundwater, petroleum or geothermal management applications.

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Co-organized by EMRP1/TS3
Convener: Márk SomogyváriECSECS | Co-conveners: Florian Amann, Peter Bayer, Mohammadreza Jalali
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
GD8.1

The goal of this session is to reconcile short-time/small-scale and long-time/large-scale observations, including geodynamic processes such as subduction, collision, rifting or mantle lithosphere interactions. Despite the remarkable advances in experimental rock mechanics, the implications of rock-mechanics data for large temporal and spatial scale tectonic processes are still not straightforward, since the latter are strongly controlled by local lithological stratification of the lithosphere, its thermal structure, fluid content, tectonic heritage, metamorphic reactions and deformation rates.

Mineral reactions have mechanical effects that may result in the development of pressure variations and thus are critical for interpreting microstructural and mineral composition observations. Such effects may fundamentally influence element transport properties and rheological behavior.
Here, we encourage presentations focused on the interplay between metamorphic processes and deformation on all scales, on the rheological behavior of crustal and mantle rocks and time scales of metamorphic reactions in order to discuss
(1) how and when up to GPa-level differential stress and pressure variations can be built and maintained at geological timescales and modelling of such systems,
(2) deviations from lithostatic pressure during metamorphism: fact or fiction?,
(3) the impact of deviations from lithostatic pressure on geodynamic reconstructions.
(4) the effect of porous fluid and partial melting on the long-term strength.
We therefore invite the researchers from different domains (rock mechanics, petrographic observations, geodynamic and thermo-mechanical modelling) to share their views on the way forward for improving our knowledge of the long-term rheology and chemo-thermo-mechanical behavior of the lithosphere and mantle.

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Co-organized by EMRP1/GMPV7/TS3
Convener: Yury Podladchikov | Co-conveners: Shun-ichiro Karato, Magdalena Scheck-Wenderoth, Lucie Tajcmanova, Leif TokleECSECS, Ake Fagereng, Amicia LeeECSECS, Luca Menegon
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST), Attendance Thu, 07 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)

TS4 – Faults: imaging, kinematics and mechanics

TS4.2

Faults are complex three-dimensional geological objects that grow and change their properties over time (i.e., fourth dimension). Therefore, their thorough understanding intrinsically requires a three- and four- rather than two-dimensional analysis. In this session, we invite contributions that address the geometrical, kinematical, and the underlying mechanical characteristics of faults, by considering their inherent three- and four-dimensional nature. Considerations in this new light will bring us closer to fully address some of the fundamental questions in fault analysis: how do faults initiate? How do they evolve in space and time? How do they accommodate displacement and at what slip rates? Ideally, contributions should arise from analysis of a broad spectrum of data such as, among others, geophysical imaging, earthquake seismicity, outcrop (including novel virtual outcrop geology), and analogue and numerical modelling data. The integration of these different data types will provide insights on characteristics of faults at different scales and resolutions, and on their evolution at different time frames. We encourage contributions that explore the repercussions that a three- and four- rather than two-dimensional approach to the study of faults can have on a broad range of practical problems such as, among others, earthquake hazard assessment and fluid flow.

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Co-organized by NH4/SM2
Convener: Giovanni CamanniECSECS | Co-conveners: Efstratios DelogkosECSECS, Michael KettermannECSECS, Vincent Roche, David Tanner
Displays
| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)

TS5 – Seismicity and deformation

TS5.1

Seismic activity and crustal deformation are indicative of underlying plate tectonic and/or volcanic processes. Their connectedness is often non-linear and non-sequential. Seismic activity can result in crustal deformation in a tectonically or volcanically active region, while deformation arising from these forces can harness seismic potency. In isolation, seismic and geodetic (GNSS, InSAR) analysis potentially run the risk of delivering partial inferences, especially in compound geodynamic settings. Evidently, independently obtained results from seismic and geodetic observations are heavily reliant on the data type, methodology, model assumptions, and error estimations. In recent times, there have been several measures to jointly employ seismic and geodetic data to understand complex processes in aforementioned settings. Such studies have made significant contributions to modern and reliable data analysis practices. Therefore, this session aims to explore ongoing research that works towards arriving at comprehensive results from both ends of the spectrum; seismicity, a form of fast deformation, and its relationship with the slower geodetically measured deformation.

The current session invites presentation of research that simultaneously incorporates seismic and geodetic (GNSS, InSAR) techniques to investigate any given tectonic and/or volcanic setting. The study may include analyses of selected earthquakes and related deformation, comparison studies between seismic and geodetic data analysis, volcanic deformation and associated seismicity, and seismic cycle monitoring based on both seismology and geodesy. We also encourage studies using models (analytical or numerical) linking geodetic and seismic research, such as stress-strain models in volcanic and tectonic areas.

Invited Abstract:
Using Seismic and Geodetic Observations in a Simultaneous Kinematic Model of the 2019 Ridgecrest, California Earthquakes
Dara Goldberg1, Diego Melgar1, Valerie Sahakian1, Amanda Thomas1, Xiaohua Xu2, Brendan Crowell3, and Jianghui Geng4
1Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon, United States of America
2Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States of America
3Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America
4Wuhan University, Wuhan, China

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Co-organized by G3/SM1
Convener: Revathy M. ParameswaranECSECS | Co-conveners: Cécile DucrocqECSECS, Siqi LiECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
TS5.2

The largest earthquakes globally occur along plate boundaries, producing intense shaking and associated secondary hazards over broad regions. In the past few years, there have been significant improvements in the quantity and quality of geodetic, seismological, and geological observations of the slow accumulation and rapid release of strain at these plate boundaries. At the same time, improvements in modeling techniques are providing new insights into the geodynamic processes controlling the occurrence of major earthquakes. With these advances, it is now becoming possible to address outstanding issues about both seismic and aseismic deformation at plate boundaries, such as time-variable locking and unlocking of the plate interface, the extent and role of slow slip events, the links between earthquake cycles and permanent deformation, and the behavior of complete cycles revealed by paleo-seismic and paleo-geodetic observations.

We invite contributions that investigate the spectrum of deformation occurring throughout the earthquake cycle at plate boundaries, from aseismic to seismic and across a variety of spatial and temporal scales. Submissions that utilize improved remote and field observational capabilities, developments in data analysis, or innovations in analog and numerical modeling to advance the understanding of the underlying physical processes are encouraged.

Public information:
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We will begin our session by allowing 5-10 minutes for participants to look through the displays and prepare some discussion points. After this, we will go through all of the presenting author, and have each author briefly introduce their research. Audience participants will then have a few minutes to ask questions and make comments. Depending on the number of displays, we will be more or less strict on timing, but we are aiming for 5-10 minutes per author. Finally, after all authors have presented, we will turn the comments to open discussion. Talk to you soon!

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Co-organized by GD9/NH4/SM4
Convener: Matthew Herman | Co-conveners: Ylona van DintherECSECS, Marcos Moreno, Luca Dal ZilioECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Tue, 05 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
TS5.3

Earthquake mechanics is controlled by a spectrum of processes covering a wide range of length scales, from tens of kilometres down to few nanometres. While the geometry of the fault/fracture network and its physical properties control the global stress distribution and the propagation/arrest of the seismic rupture, earthquake nucleation and fault weakening is governed by frictional processes occurring within extremely localized sub-planar slipping zones. The co-seismic rheology of the slipping zones themselves depends on deformation mechanisms and dissipative processes active at the scale of the grain or asperity. The study of such complex multiscale systems requires an interdisciplinary approach spanning from structural geology to seismology, geophysics, petrology, rupture modelling and experimental rock deformation. In this session we aim to convene contributions dealing with different aspects of earthquake mechanics at various depths and scales such as:

· the thermo-hydro-mechanical processes associated with co-seismic fault weakening based on rock deformation experiments, numerical simulations and microstructural studies of fault rocks;
· the study of natural and experimental fault rocks to investigate the nucleation mechanisms of intermediate and deep earthquakes in comparison to their shallow counterparts;
· the elastic, frictional and transport properties of fault rocks from the field (geophysical and hydrogeological data) to the laboratory scale (petrophysical and rock deformation studies);
· the internal architecture of seismogenic fault zones from field structural survey and geophysical investigations;
· the modeling of earthquake ruptures, off-fault dynamic stress fields and long-term mechanical evolution of realistic fault networks;
· the earthquake source energy budget and partitioning between fracture, friction and elastic wave radiation from seismological, theoretical and field observations.
· the interplay between fault geometry and earthquake rupture characteristics from seismological, geodetic, remote sensed or field observations;

We particularly welcome novel observations or innovative approaches to the study of earthquake faulting. Contributions from early career scientists are solicited.

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Co-organized by EMRP1/SM2
Convener: Matteo DemurtasECSECS | Co-conveners: Stefano AretusiniECSECS, Michele FondriestECSECS, Francois PasselegueECSECS, Marco Maria ScuderiECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Tue, 05 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
TS5.4

Tectonic faults accommodate plate motion through various styles of seismic and aseismic slip spanning a wide range of spatiotemporal scales. Understanding the mechanics and interplay between seismic rupture and aseismic slip is central to seismotectonics as it determines the seismic potential of faults. In particular, unraveling the underlying physics controlling these styles of deformation bears a great deal in earthquakes hazards mitigation especially in highly urbanized regions.
In partnership with the AGU Tectonophysics section, we invite contributions from observational, experimental, geological and theoretical studies that explore the diversity and interplay among seismic and aseismic slip phenomena in various tectonic settings, including the following questions: (1) How does the nature of creeping faults change with the style of faulting, loading rate, and other factors? (2) Are different slip behaviors well separated in space, or can the same fault areas experience different failure modes? (3) Is there a systematic spatial or temporal relation between different types of slip?

Invited speakers:
- Chris Marone, Penn State. "Fault healing plays a key role in creating the spectrum of tectonic faulting styles from seismic to aseismic slip "

- Adriano Gualandi, Caltech. "Towards Slow Earthquakes Forecasting"

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Co-organized by GD9/SM2, co-sponsored by AGU-Tectonophysics
Convener: Jorge JaraECSECS | Co-conveners: Blandine GardonioECSECS, Luca Dal ZilioECSECS, Allie HutchisonECSECS, Valere LambertECSECS, Sylvain MichelECSECS, Harsha S. Bhat
Displays
| Attendance Tue, 05 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
TS5.5

The broad scale tectonics of the Eastern Mediterranean are dominated by the interaction of the Nubian and Arabian plates with the Eurasian plate. This complex tectonic frame exhibit almost all type of plate boundary conditions such as continental convergence and extension, oceanic subduction, and continental transform. The evolution and present deformation are constrained by diverse geological, geophysical, and geodetic observations and have been explained by different hypotheses, such as (a) tectonic escape system caused by the post-collisional convergence of Eurasian and Arabian plates creating forces at its boundaries with gravitational potential differences of the Anatolian high plateau (b) asthenospheric flow dragging the circular flow of lithosphere from the Levant to Anatolia in the east and the Aegean in the west, (c) slab pull of the Hellenic subduction, (d) mantle upwelling underneath Afar and with the large-scale flow associated with a whole mantle, Tethyan convection cell, (e) or combinations of these mechanisms for the Eastern Mediterranean. Naturally, this tectonic setting generates frequent earthquakes with large magnitudes (M > 7), forming a natural laboratory on understanding the crustal deformation, and crust-mantle interactions for various disciplines of active tectonics.
Multi-disciplinary studies, especially within the last three decades, have made significant contributions to our understanding of the processes on the crustal deformation, and interaction of the mantle with the crustal processes of this region. With this session, we aim to bring together the recent findings of these studies, thus we welcome/invite contributions from a wide range of disciplines including, but not limited to, neotectonics, seismology, tectonic geodesy (e.g. GNSS, InSAR), paleoseismology, tectonic geomorphology, remote sensing, structural geology and geodynamic modelling, which geographically cover the Eastern Mediterranean region, including Anatolia-Aegean Block, Caucasus, Iran, Middle East and Greece.

Invited talks:
- Jonathan Weiss - Measuring Anatolian plate velocity and strain with InSAR: Implications for fault-locking, seismic hazard, and crustal dynamics.
- Pierre Henry - Contrasting seismogenic behaviors on the North Anatolian Fault in the Sea of Marmara

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Co-organized by GD7/NH4/SM2
Convener: Cengiz Zabcı | Co-conveners: Michael Floyd, A. Ozgun Konca, Onno Oncken, Philippe Vernant
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
SM6.1

In tectonic and volcanic regions earthquake swarms and seismic sequences are frequently characterized by complex temporal evolution, and a delayed occurrence of the largest magnitude earthquakes. The complex evolution of such seismic sequences is generally considered to derive from transient forcing where fluids play a major role causing slow-slip and creeping events, and – at volcanoes – stresses due to magma migration (i.e. dike intrusion and pressurization of the magma plumbing system). Yet, the mechanisms of fluid-rock interaction, leading to changes of the rheological properties of faults, and of the fracture mechanics, are still far beyond a full understanding. Therefore, it is fundamental to develop and implement innovative methodologies and technologies or to apply multi-disciplinary approaches for a multi-parametric crustal imaging aimed at tracking fluid movements and/or pore fluid-pressure diffusion within the seismogenic crust, and to integrate the results with the analysis of spatio-temporal and size characteristics of earthquake occurrence. The two approaches complement each other improving, on one hand, our understanding of crustal properties and, on the other hand, help constraining the degree of involvement of fluids by the analysis of the earthquake statistics.
This session aims at putting together studies of swarms and complex seismic sequences modulated by aseismic transient forcing as well as field studies, numerical modeling, theoretical and experimental investigation on the detection and tracking of crustal fluids in tectonic, volcanic and industrial contexts. Contributions from multi-disciplinary studies of fluid geochemistry, surface ground deformation and space-time variations of electrical and seismic crustal properties are also welcome, as well as laboratory and numerical modeling simulating the mechanical condition yielding to fluid-driven swarm-like and complex seismic sequences.

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Co-organized by GMPV9/TS5
Convener: Luigi Passarelli | Co-conveners: Grazia De LandroECSECS, Nicola D'Agostino, Francesco Maccaferri, Maria MesimeriECSECS, Mathilde Radiguet, Agata Siniscalchi, Tony Alfredo Stabile
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST), Attendance Fri, 08 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
SM6.3

Crustal faults are complex natural systems whose physical and chemical properties change with time over several scales. Tracking the evolution of a fault system toward the generation of a large earthquake requires thus a multi-disciplinary approach, that involves the analysis and modelling of seismological, geodetic, geochemical and other geophysical observations. To understand the fault behaviour, near-fault observatories have been deployed in Europe and worldwide, as dense, innovative infrastructures that monitor the underlying Earth crust providing state-of-the-art, high-resolution multidisciplinary time series.

This session promotes contributions aimed at characterizing physical and chemical processes related to the fault evolution through cross-disciplinary analysis and modelling of near fault observations. We encourage the submission of works that investigate faulting processes such as earthquake preparation, nucleation and triggering processes, aseismic transients and forcing mechanisms such as creeping that may influence further rupture development, diffusive processes associated to fluid migration and fluid-rock interaction, accurate location and characterization of the micro-seismicity to constrain space-time-magnitude patterns and other tectonic transients that may affect fault tectonics.

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Co-organized by TS5
Convener: Gaetano Festa | Co-conveners: Lauro Chiaraluce, Tomáš Fischer, Alexandru Marmureanu
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
SM2.5

Since 2004, there have been a number of large subduction earthquakes whose unexpected rupture features contributed to the generation of devastating tsunamis. The impact that these events have had on human society highlights the need to improve our knowledge of the key mechanisms behind their origin. Advances in these areas have led to progress in our understanding of the most important parameters affecting tsunamigenesis.

With increasing geophysical data, new descriptions of faulting and rupture complexity are being hypothesized (e.g., spatial and temporal seismic rupture heterogeneity, fault roughness, geometry and sediment type, interseismic coupling, etc.). Rock physicists have proposed new constitutive laws and parameters based on a new generation of laboratory experiments, which simulate close to natural seismic deformation conditions on natural fault samples. In addition, advances in numerical modelling now allow scientists to test how new geophysical observations, e.g. ocean drilling projects and laboratory analyses, influence subduction zone processes over a range of temporal and spatial scales (i.e., geodynamic, seismic cycling, earthquake rupture, wave propagation modelling).

In light of these advances, this session has a twofold mission: i) to integrate recent results from different fields to foster a comprehensive understanding of the key parameters controlling the physics of large subduction earthquakes over a range of spatial and temporal scales; ii) to identify how tsunami hazard analysis can benefit from using a multi-disciplinary approach.

We invite abstracts that enhance interdisciplinary collaboration and integrate observations, rock physics experiments, analog- and numerical modeling, and tsunami hazard.

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Co-organized by EMRP1/NH5/TS5
Convener: Elena SpagnuoloECSECS | Co-conveners: Yoshi Ito, Shane Murphy, Fabrizio Romano
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
SM2.11

The Mediterranean region spanning from the Betic Cordillera and the Alboran Sea to the Levantine and Dead Seas is the most tectonically active region of Europe. Over the last decades several moderate to large magnitude earthquakes affected the Mediterranean regions often causing substantial economical and sometimes human losses. The scientific community is developing a better understanding of the crustal processes that may drive seismic sequences thanks to denser and higher quality geophysical networks, multidisciplinary experiments and rapid field deployments in the aftermath of a mainshock. This allowed increasingly larger and more accurate datasets that can be exploited to improve the knowledge of crustal seismogenic processes. Over the years, this effort lead to the identification of seismic gaps, the production of seismic hazard maps and, not least, the characterization of seismogenic structures. Yet, each seismic sequence seems to be strongly affected by the local tectonics and by the interplay of crustal processes.

In this session we welcome contributions aimed at a better understanding of recent seismic sequences that may help improving our still fragmentary knowledge of earthquake nucleation processes. We are interested in new results from earthquakes that occurred both in front-arc and back-arc regions along the convergence zones between Africa and Europe, in the Apennines and other Mediterranean regions and their comparison with major historical earthquakes. This includes geophysical experiments, analyses of recent seismic sequences, and multidisciplinary studies focusing on the identification, characterisation and monitoring of seismic gaps. We also encourage analyses of fluid-driven seismic sequences and offshore campaigns characterizing key regional faults.

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Co-organized by GD7/TS5
Convener: Matteo Lupi | Co-conveners: Athanassios Ganas, Eulàlia Gràcia, Marc-Andre Gutscher, Fabio Villani
Displays
| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
SM2.2

Typical practice for seismic hazard assessment (SHA) in stable continental regions (SCRs) uses a global-analogues approach to amalgamate seismicity data from SCRs globally. This approach is premised on all SCR crust sharing the same seismogenic potential. Is this approach valid? How can we better define seismogenic analogues in low strain regions? Are earthquake recurrence and long-term slip rates meaningful concepts in these settings for the purpose of seismic hazard analysis?
This session seeks to integrate paleoseismic, geomorphic, geodetic, geophysical and seismological datasets to provide insight into the earthquake cycle in low-strain regions. It will draw upon recent advances in high-resolution topography, geochronology, satellite geodesy techniques, subsurface imaging techniques, longer seismological records, high-density geophysical networks and unprecedented computational power to explore the driving mechanisms for earthquakes in low-strain settings. A comparison of the range of seismic behavior as a function of the different geodynamic attributes of these settings (e.g., crustal age, structure, stress, geology, antecedent
tectonics (inheritance); evolving boundary conditions; Quaternary processes (glaciation), etc), may provide a means to better refine and constrain the types of features or active processes that warrant treatment as analogues for seismic hazard assessment. We welcome contributions that (1) present new observations that place constraints on earthquake occurrence in low-strain regions, (2) explore patterns of stable or temporally varying earthquake recurrence, and (3) provide insight into the mechanisms that control earthquakes in regions of slow deformation via observation and/or
modeling.

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Co-organized by NH4/TS5
Convener: Pierre Arroucau | Co-conveners: Beau WhitneyECSECS, Susana Custódio, Stéphane Baize, Ryan Gold, Dan Clark, Gordana Vlahovic, Sierd Cloetingh
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
NH5.7

The study of active tectonic structures in offshore areas has been hampered by the scarcity of direct observations and by the limited resolution of indirect data. Nevertheless, in the last years, the development of new geophysical instrumentation and the acquisition of high-resolution bathymetric and active and passive seismic data (i.e., chirp, parametric sounder, multichannel profiles or OBS information) has allowed making major advances in the study of active faults in offshore areas. These new data have become fundamental not only to identify and describe active tectonic structures but also to characterize their Quaternary activity and seismogenic potential. Together with these developments, our understanding of marine active tectonics and our knowledge about their associated hazards have also improved.
The aim of this session is to compile studies which focus on the use of geophysical data to identify and characterize offshore active structures (i.e., faults and folds), their seismogenic and tsunamigenic potential and possibly related features such as submarine landslides, and to estimate the related hazards. Studies can be focused at regional or local scale and the session includes but is not limited to, the following topics:
- Active faulting identification and description and/or 3D modeling.
- Contribution of seismicity analysis to the seismotectonic characterization of offshore areas.
- Seismogenic characterization of active structures and estimation of their tsunamigenic potential.
- Active tectonics processes related to landslides triggering.
- Contribution of marine active tectonic study to the hazard assessment.

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Co-organized by TS5
Convener: Laura Gómez de la PeñaECSECS | Co-conveners: Francesco Emanuele Maesano, Sara Martínez-LorienteECSECS, Hector Perea, Morelia UrlaubECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
NH4.1

The study of active faults and deformation of the Earth's surface has made, and continues to make, significant contributions to our understanding of earthquakes and the assessment of seismic related hazard. Active faulting may form and deform the Earth's surface so that records are documented in young sediments and in the landscape. Field studies of recent earthquake ruptures help to constrain earthquake source parameters and to identify previously unknown active structures. The insights gleaned from recent earthquakes can be applied to study past earthquakes. Paleoseismology and related disciplines such as paleogeodesy and paleotsunami investigations still are the primary tools to establish earthquake records that are long enough to determine recurrence intervals and long-term deformation rates for active faults. Multidisciplinary data sets accumulated over the years have brought unprecedented constraints on the size and timing of past earthquakes and allow deciphering shorter-term variations in fault slip rates or seismic activity rates, as well as the interaction of single faults within fault systems. This wide range of methods leads to a wide range of uncertainties in the definition of what is an active fault, which parameters are entered in fault databases, which consequently conditions the strategy used to transfer earthquake-fault data into fault models suitable for probabilistic SHA. Which uncertainty can be quantified by geologists and how can it be made easily accessible for proper usage in hazard computation is a fundamental question that the FAULT2SHA ESC working group (www.fault2sha.net) is attempting to tackle.
This FAULT2SHA session aims to spark a discussion between field earthquake geologists, crustal deformation modellers and fault modellers/seismic hazard practitioners around fault-related uncertainty issues and their inclusion in fault-based PSHA. We welcome contributions describing and critically discussing approaches used to study active faults as well as presentations discussing existing efforts on how fault-related information is translated into dedicated databases of primary surface information and then into 3D fault models. We particularly encourage contributions related to local studies of fault systems where specific issues could be debated on either fault data collection aspects, databases questions and/or fault hazard modelling

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Co-organized by SM3/TS5
Convener: Oona Scotti | Co-conveners: Esther Hintersberger, Bruno Pace
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)

TS6 – Extensional tectonic settings

TS6.1

The separation of the African and Arabian plates is responsible for the opening of the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden that meet the East African Rift at the Afar triple junction. Moreover, the strike-slip movement between the African and the Arabian plates is accommodated in the northernmost part of the rift system by the Dead Sea fault and its marine extension in the Gulf of Aqaba. High volcanic and seismic activity in and around the three arms of the divergence highlights some of the key aspects of this opening system.

This complex geodynamic system is currently investigated by multiple geoscientific approaches including e.g., tectonics, volcanology, stratigraphy, geodynamics, geodesy as well as active and passive geophysical methods.

In this session, we welcome contributions that are based on (but not limited to) such methods and investigate the basins of the Gulf of Suez, Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, Afar depression and their surrounding regions, from the mantle to the crust.

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Co-organized by GD7/GMPV11/SM4
Convener: Laura ParisiECSECS | Co-conveners: Nico Augustin, Joël Ruch, Daniele TrippaneraECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
TS6.2

The West Pacific regime is dominated by a convergent plate setting, but develops two thirds of the world’s marginal basins which have different histories and causes. Some are built on continental crust and some formed by seafloor spreading. Some began to form in Mesozoic time and others began in Cenozoic time. Many are filled with sediments and volcanics and some of these contain hydrocarbon deposits. Some are no longer actively extending but others are still tectonically active and pose hazards to nearby coastal communities. The purpose of this session is to present our modern understanding of these marginal basins, how they formed, how they subsided, how they were filled, how they died, and the economic benefits and potential hazards they present.
In this session, we welcome all contributions that deal with marginal basins in the West Pacific and/or try to answer to the questions related to the evolution of marginal basins in convergent plate settings. We particularly encourage multi-disciplinary studies that address the issues of inheritance on the rifting process, the discuss modes of breakup, the role of magmatism in lithospheric breakup and the contribution of sedimentation and source to sink processes in marginal margins.

Public information:
(1) For attenders, you are encrouraged to download and read through the related present materials before the session, and prepare your comments and questions (in text) in advance to avoid delays;
(2) For presenters, please give a short summary of your research, and be prepared to answer questions. It will be better to have some of the answers on your conclusions and methods typed in advance.
(3) Provide your contacts to audience, thus the discussion could continue after the session.

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Co-organized by GD7
Convener: Weiwei Ding | Co-conveners: Dieter Franke, Jiabiao Li, Gianreto Manatschal, Zhen SUN
Displays
| Attendance Tue, 05 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
GD7.2

Interdisciplinary study of the Northeast Atlantic region offers an extraordinary opportunity to advance understanding of interactions and co-dependencies between the solid Earth, ocean, atmosphere, cryosphere and climate. Understanding these issues are of critical importance to Europe and Scandinavia, and they are of global relevance. The unprecedented surge in exploration of the Northeast Atlantic Realm that has unfolded in recent years has delivered major leaps forward in understanding its geological structure, dynamics and development, economic resources and volcanism. Examples include the complexity of the conjugate volcanic rifted margins, contact metamorphism of carbon-rich shales by sill intrusions, producing thermogenic methane, the discovery of widespread continental crust in the ocean, the critical role of the Greenland-Iceland-Faroe bathymetric ridge in influencing ocean circulation between the Arctic and the Atlantic south of Iceland, mapping of gas hydrates and the study of crustal structure beneath the Greenland icecap. Throughout the Cenozoic these factors have influenced ocean and atmosphere composition and circulation, climate change, and the growth, wastage and transport of ice. Detailed understanding of the interdependencies of these phenomena in the past and through time is arguably of critical importance to understanding the current, rapid changes in the natural environment. The goal of this special session is to bring together diverse contributions drawing on all the above disciplines in order to identify potentially fertile areas for broad, cross-disciplinary study of the Northeast Atlantic Realm moving forward.

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Co-organized by CL1/OS1/TS6
Convener: Laurent Geoffroy | Co-conveners: G.R. Foulger, Dieter Franke, Catherine Kissel
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
TS6.4

The acquisition of new datasets at Continent-Ocean-Transition (COT) of rifted margins show significant variability, highlighting the diversity of parameters controlling the rift-to-drift transition during continental breakup. This session aims at gathering new observations, concepts, and techniques to investigate deformation mechanisms, dynamics of continental breakup, and generation of the first oceanic crust. We invite presentations focusing on topics from rifting up to incipient seafloor spreading, including studies discussing the structure and nature of COT, tectonic, magmatic, rheological and thermal evolution, melt initiation, sedimentary records, deformation mechanisms, and alteration processes. We encourage contributions using multidisciplinary and innovative methods including marine geosciences, seismology, sedimentology, field geology, geochemistry, thermochronology, plate reconstruction, and modelling. We welcome studies based on worldwide natural examples from active rifts, fossil and present-day rifted margins. Special emphasis will be given to presentations that integrate comparisons of tectonic and magmatic processes between continental and oceanic settings that could improve our understanding of continental breakup and mid-oceanic ridge initiation.

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Co-organized by GD6/SSP2
Convener: Michael NirrengartenECSECS | Co-conveners: Julie TugendECSECS, J. Kim Welford, James NorcliffeECSECS, Craig Magee
Displays
| Attendance Tue, 05 May, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)

TS7 – Convergent tectonic settings

TS7.1

The evolution of the Apennines is framed between the fragmentation of Pangea and the development of the Tyrrhenian Basin, thus carrying the memory from the Permian and Triassic rifting, to the Oligocene-Miocene collision, and finally to the Miocene-Present coexistence between extension and shortening, in the western and eastern sector respectively.
In this session, we aim to discuss: (a) deformation and metamorphism developed in the different tectonic environments, from rifting to subduction, exhumation and late-orogenic stages; (b) the sedimentary evolution, from Permian to Present, and its relation with tectonics; (c) the Mesozoic carbonate platform evolution and its role in the Apennines; (d) magmatism in space and time and its connection with the geodynamic evolution, from the mountain chain to the Tyrrhenian Basin; (e) processes forming geological resources, from oil to ore deposits and geothermal fields; (f) recent tectonics, as reconstructed through seismological and paleo-seismological studies; (g) the crustal structure, as derived by geophysical methods and their interpretation.
The final goal is to have a thorough and fruitful discussion through a multidisciplinary and integrated approach, improving our capability to define the interconnection between structural heritage and the different processes defining the Apennines evolution.

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Convener: Domenico Liotta | Co-convener: Giancarlo Molli
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
TS7.2

Foreland basins archive the evolution of mountain belts, and fold-thrust belts are the linking elements between orogens and their forelands. One of the major challenges for understanding the dynamics of mountain belts is untangling the different driving mechanisms that can be responsible for exhumation of mountain belts and foreland basin deformation. In particular, the signals of plate convergence (i.e. tectonic processes), deep seated (mantle-related) processes, or climate differ with respect to their timing and spatial extent. Ensuing foreland deformation is also influenced by heterogeneity of the deforming material. For instance, stratigraphic variations of the foreland basin fill or its substrate or inherited structures add complexity to the system.

In this session we invite contributions focusing on linking mantle and crustal tectonic processes with foreland basin dynamics. This includes addressing the interplay between plate boundary forces and of inherited structures, sediment production, transport and deposition (source to sink studies), and studies constraining timing of orogen processes at different scales (ranging from short term deformation rates to longer term rates based on cosmogenic nuclides or thermochronometry). We particularly invite contributions linking geophysical with geological data including 3-D models and addressing their respective uncertainties. We encourage the presentation of field-based studies as well as analog and numerical models highlighting the link between foreland basin deformation and mountain building processes including deformation of fold-thrust belts.

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Co-organized by GD5/SSP2
Convener: Christoph von Hagke | Co-conveners: Pablo GranadoECSECS, Matthias Rosenau, Stefano Tavani
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
TS7.4

The Alpine-Himalayan orogenic belt is one of the largest and most prominent suture zones on Earth. The belt ranges from the Mediterranean in the west to Indonesia in the east. It results from the subduction and closing of different branches of the Tethyan Oceanic Realm and the subsequent collision of the African, Arabian and Indian continental plates with Eurasia. Its long-lasting geological record of complex interactions among major and smaller plates, featuring the presence of subduction zones at different evolutionary stages, has progressively grown as a comprehensive test site to investigate fundamental plate tectonics and geodynamic processes with multi-disciplinary studies. Advances in a variety of geophysical and geological fields provide a rich and growing set of constraints on the crust-lithosphere and mantle structure, as well as tectonics and geodynamic evolution of the entire mountain belt

We welcome contributions presenting new insights and observations derived from different perspectives like geology (stratigraphy, petrology, geochronology, geochemistry, tectonics and geomorphology), geophysics (seismicity, seismic imaging, seismic anisotropy, gravity), geodesy (GPS, InSAR), modelling (numerical and analogue), risk assessment (earthquake, volcanism), as well as from multi-disciplinary studies.

Keynote presentation by Boris Kaus (University of Mainz)

Public information:
The discussion during the chat sessions will follow an order based on location (from East to West), and divide the abstracts such that in the first block we will go from the Himalaya region to Turkey-Anatolia-Cyprus and the East Mediterranean Basin, and in the second block, we will cover the Mediterranean from the Western side of the Black Sea (i.e. Bulgaria) to the Westernmost Mediterranean. The preliminary order (hoping that authors upload their display) is:
14:00-15:45
1· Jatupohnkhongchai et al.
2· Bai et al.
3· Chen et al.

4· Knight et al.
5· Stoner et al.
6· Wei Li et al.

7· Barbero et al.
8 Lom et al.
9· Simmonds et al.
10· Mahleqa Rezaei et al.

11· Sağlam et al.
12· Mueller et al.
13· Gürer et al.
14· Nirrengarten et al.

BREAK (30 minutes)

16:15-18:00
1· de Leeuw et al.
2· Balkanska and Georgiev (?)

3· Faucher et al.
4· Molnár et al.
5· Stanković et al.

6· Schneider and Balen
7· Chang et al.
8· Kaus et al.
9· El-Sharkawy et al.
10· Agostini et al.

11· Gimeno et al.
12· de la Peña et al.
13· Negredo et al.
14· Jiménez-Munt et al.
15· Kumar et al.

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Co-organized by GD7/GMPV11/SM2
Convener: Ágnes KirályECSECS | Co-conveners: Derya GürerECSECS, Marc Hässig, Claudia Piromallo
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST), Attendance Fri, 08 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
TS7.5

The prominent morphological features in central Asia are the mountain ranges of the Pamir, Tian Shan, and the Himalaya-Tibetan orogen. The present-day morphology is the result of uplift related to the Cenozoic India-Asia collision. However, this is built upon a long-lasting and complex pre-Cenozoic history of ocean closures (Proto- and Paleo-Tethys, Paleo-Asian), accretion of terranes and related reorganization of Asia´s southern margin. This long-lasting history of consecutive accretionary events left behind a complex mosaic of high- and low-strain domains, allochthonous blocks (terranes) and intervening suture zones. A significant challenge is to correlate and date those domains, which are often used as large scale structural markers for e.g. the Cenozoic indentation of the Pamirs. Both the pre-Cenozoic history and the timing and kinematics of young deformation have to be well-constrained in order to reconstruct the pre-Cenozoic configuration and understand how it conditioned Asia´s response to India´s collision.

As all the above mentioned mountain ranges record stages in the pre-Cenozoic evolution of Asia´s southern margin, it is necessary to compare and correlate these evolutionary stages in time and space. Therefore we invite contributions from geoscientists who are working on various aspects of the geologic evolution of Central Asia, including structural geology, geochemistry and sedimentology as well as geophysical or modeling studies.

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Convener: Johannes RembeECSECS | Co-conveners: Jonas Kley, Yani Najman, Rasmus Thiede
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
TS7.6

The Alps have been intensively studied by geologists for more than a century, providing a unique natural laboratory to deepen our understanding of orogenic processes and their relationship to mantle dynamics. Although most concepts that underlie current studies of mountain belts and convergence dynamics were born in the Alps, the belt is now being examined with renewed vigour in the AlpArray project. This project involves a large number of European institutions, with efforts focused on the AlpArray Seismic Network to provide homogeneous seismological coverage of the greater Alpine area at unprecedented aperture and station density, both on land and sea. New data is being recorded in a multidisciplinary research effort, and other projects are being planned in the immediate and mid-term future.
Within this context, we invite contributions from the Earth Science community that highlight new results in AlpArray and that identify and solve key open questions of the present and past structure and dynamics of the Alps and neighbouring orogens. Both disciplinary and multi-disciplinary contributions are welcome from geophysical imaging, (seismo)tectonics, structural geology, gravimetry, geodesy, geodynamics, petrology, geochronology and other allied fields, combined with various modelling approaches. Scales of interest range from crustal to upper mantle, in the Alps and neighbouring mountain belts such as the Apennines, the Carpathians and the Dinarides.

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Co-organized by GD7/SM4
Convener: Anne Paul | Co-conveners: M. R. Handy, György Hetényi, Marco Giovanni Malusa', Irene Molinari
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST), Attendance Thu, 07 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
TS7.8

In the past years, there have been major breakthroughs in the understanding of the evolution of Pyrenean orogenic belt and related basins, incorporating new concepts of rifted margins and hyperextension. This is leading to a new generation of lithospheric-scale models addressing the role of tectonic inheritance and the application of the Wilson cycle. Models are being populated with rich new databases on structural geology, paleothermal analysis, low-temperature geochronology and detrital geochronology, mainly applied to the provenance and sediment routing signature of preorogenic and synorogenic basins, all supported by recent collaborative programs like Orogen and other French, Spanish and international projects. We invite contributions that address these points, from diverse and multidisciplinary perspectives.

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Convener: Antonio Teixell | Co-convener: Raphaël Pik
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
TS7.9

Subduction zones are one of the key players in driving plate tectonics. They are also the locus of most mineral and rock transformations, mass/fluid transfer and seismicity. Understanding initiation, development and closure of subduction zones -including their evolution into collisional systems- is therefore a challenge facing Earth sciences. This session aims at covering the tectonic and metamorphic evolution from nascent to mature convergent systems in both space and time as well as studying the complex feedbacks of processes related to the thermo-mechanical history of subducted and exhumed rocks. This includes studies focusing on tectonic processes in oceanic and continental subduction setting over space and timescales (e.g. mechanical (de)coupling, rock accretion and exhumation...) in active and ancient convergent settings. We welcome contributions from a wide range of disciplines such as structural geology, tectonics, petrology, geophysics, experimental deformation and numerical modelling, with particular emphasis on the rock record.

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Co-organized by GD5/GMPV7
Convener: Mathieu SoretECSECS | Co-conveners: Samuel Angiboust, Hugues Raimbourg, Zoe BradenECSECS, Vincent RocheECSECS, Jiří Konopásek
Displays
| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
TS7.10

Orogenic plateaus and their margins are integral parts of modern mountain ranges and offer unique opportunities to study the feedback between tectonics and climate through the Earth’s surface. Complex interactions and feedbacks occur among a wide range of parameters, including crustal and deep-seated deformation, basin growth, uplift, precipitation and erosion, landscape and biological change; and lead to (i) the growth, recycling, and destruction of the lithosphere; (ii) shifts in surface elevation; and (iii) high topography that can affect atmospheric circulation. These controlling factors result in plateau lateral growth and its characteristic morpho-climatic domains: humid, high-relief margins that contrast with (semi-)arid, low-relief plateau interiors.

This session aims at creating a discussion forum on the complex interactions and feedbacks among climatic, surficial and geodynamic processes that challenge the notion of a comprehensive mechanism for surface uplift and topographic growth in orogenic plateaus and their margins. To fuel the exchange, we welcome studies of orogenic plateaus worldwide at various scales, from the Earth’s mantle and crust to its surface and atmosphere. We particularly encourage contributions that aim at bridging temporal and spatial gaps between datasets using an interdisciplinary approach or novel techniques.

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Co-organized by CL4/GD5/GM9/SSP1
Convener: David Fernández-BlancoECSECS | Co-conveners: Maud J.M. Meijers, Alexander RohrmannECSECS, Flora BajoletECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
SSP2.13

Interactions between tectonics, climate and biotic evolution are ideally expressed in Asian orogenies. The ongoing surge of international research on Asian regions enables to better constrain paleoenvironmental changes and biotic evolutions as well as their potential driving mechanisms such as global climate, the India-Asia collision and the tectonic growth of the Himalayan-Tibetan and other Asian orogens. Together these efforts allow for a comprehensive paleogeographic and paleoenvironmental reconstructions that enable to constrain climate modelling experiments which permit validation of hypotheses on potential interactions.
The goal of this session is to assemble research efforts that constrain Asian tectonic, climate (monsoons, westerlies, aridification), land-sea distribution, surface processes or paleobiogeographic evolution at various timescales. We invite contributions from any discipline aiming for this goal including broadly integrated stratigraphy, tectonic, biogeology, climate modelling, geodynamic, oceanography, geochemistry or petrology.

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Co-organized by CL1/EMRP3/GD7/TS7
Convener: Guillaume Dupont-Nivet | Co-conveners: Frederic Fluteau, Carina Hoorn, Niels MeijerECSECS, Douwe J. J. van Hinsbergen
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
GD5.2

Subduction zones are arguably the most important geological features of our planet, where plates plunge into the deep, metamorphic reactions take place, large earthquakes happen and melting induces volcanism and creation of continental crust. None of these processes would be possible without the cycling of volatiles, and this session aims to explore their role in convergent margins. Questions to address include the following. Do Atlantic and Pacific subduction zones cycle volatiles in different ways? What dynamic or chemical roles are played by subducted fracture zones and plate bending faults? How do fluids and melts interact with the mantle wedge and overlying lithosphere? Why do some of the Earth’s largest mineral resources form in subduction settings? We aim to bring together geodynamicists, geochemists, petrologists, seismologists, mineral and rock physicists, and structural geologists to understand how plate hydration/slab dynamics/dehydration, and subsequent mantle wedge melting/fluid percolation, and ultimately melt segregation/accumulation lead to the diverse range of phenomena observed at convergence zones around the globe.

Includes Augustus Love Medal by Harro Schmeling
Invited Speaker: Nestor Cerpa (University of Montpellier, France)

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Co-organized by GMPV2/SM6/TS7
Convener: Jeroen van Hunen | Co-conveners: Jenny Collier, Colin Macpherson, Andreas Rietbrock, Jamie Wilkinson
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
GD5.1

Subduction drives plate tectonics, generating the major proportion of subaerial volcanism, releasing >90% seismic moment magnitude, forming continents, and recycling lithosphere. Therefore, it is the most important geodynamical phenomenon on Earth and the major driver of global geochemical cycles. Seismological data show a fascinating range in shapes of subducting slabs. Arc volcanism illustrates the complexity of geochemical and petrological phenomena associated with subduction.

Numerical and laboratory modelling studies have successfully built our understanding of many aspects of the geodynamics of subduction zones. Detailed geochemical studies, investigating compositional variation within and between volcanic arcs, provide further insights into systematic chemical processes at the slab surface and within the mantle wedge, providing constraints on thermal structures and material transport within subduction zones. However, with different technical and methodological approaches, model set-ups, inputs and material properties, and in some cases conflicting conclusions between chemical and physical models, a consistent picture of the controlling parameters of subduction-zone processes has so far not emerged.

This session aims to follow subducting lithosphere on its journey from the surface down into the Earth's mantle, and to understand the driving processes for deformation and magmatism in the over-riding plate. We aim to address topics such as: subduction initiation and dynamics; changes in mineral breakdown processes at the slab surface; the formation and migration of fluids and melts at the slab surface; primary melt generation in the wedge; subduction-related magmatism; controls on the position and width of the volcanic arc; subduction-induced seismicity; mantle wedge processes; the fate of subducted crust, sediments and volatiles; the importance of subducting seamounts, LIPs, and ridges; links between near-surface processes and slab dynamics and with regional tectonic evolution; slab delamination and break-off; the effect of subduction on mantle flow; and imaging subduction zone processes.

With this session, we aim to form an integrated picture of the subduction process, and invite contributions from a wide range of disciplines, such as geodynamics, modelling, geochemistry, petrology, volcanology and seismology, to discuss subduction zone dynamics at all scales from the surface to the lower mantle, or in applications to natural laboratories.

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Co-organized by GMPV2/SM2/TS7
Convener: Oğuz H Göğüş | Co-conveners: Taras Gerya, Ágnes KirályECSECS, Wim Spakman
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)

TS8 – Strike-slip Tectonics

TS8.2

It is becoming increasingly apparent that the majority of rifts contain a component of obliquity. As such, a spectrum of obliquity can be recognised from orthogonal rifts through to pure strike-slip tectonics. At one end of the spectrum, continental strike-slip and deep oceanic transform faults form major active plate boundaries and are intrinsic features of plate tectonics. Both types of faults are still poorly known in terms of structure, rheology and deformation. Recent works have shown that fracture zones, supposedly inactive features, can be reactivated and be the site of large earthquakes and deformation. The tectonic and magmatic response of large offset transform faults, particularly, is still largely unknown.
The cause of rift obliquity and transform tectonics has been attributed to a range of driving mechanisms, including: oblique crustal and mantle inheritance, a reduced force required for plastic yielding, changes in far-field forces, asthenospheric dynamics, and grain size changes in the lower crust and mantle. The effects of obliquity on rift and transform evolution are extensive, often leading to unique structural settings dominated by transtensional and transpressional processes. The spatio-temporal overlap of distinctive rifting events (governed by transtensional, transpressional or orthogonal kinematics) can result in strongly segmented 3D rift architectures that may influence subsequent reactivation. Rift obliquity and transforms have been linked to a diverse array of phenomena including: rift and breakup-related magmatism, subduction initiation, supercontinent dispersal, microcontinent cleaving, structural inheritance, relative plate motion, hydrocarbon systems, geothermal energy potential, lithosphere-hydrosphere interaction, and hazardous seismic activity.
In this session, we will explore the formation, evolution, the physical properties, the extinction and reactivation of orthogonal, oblique and transform extensional systems and large deep oceanic transform-fracture systems. We seek contributions that address these topics from all geoscience disciplines using both geological and geophysical data, numerical and analogue modelling, and/or direct rock studies from different settings and natural examples, at all scales. Special emphasis will be given to multidisciplinary studies. We count on abstracts divulging on-going international projects and submissions from early career researchers.

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Convener: Patricia Cadenas MartínezECSECS | Co-conveners: Georgios-Pavlos FarangitakisECSECS, Alexander L. PeaceECSECS, Jordan J. J. PhetheanECSECS, Louise Watremez, João Duarte, Marcia Maia, Christian Hensen
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)

TS9 – Tectonics and surface processes

TS9.1

The consideration of entire “Source to Sink" systems is one of the most recent and challenging advance in earth surface dynamics and sedimentary geology. To understand S2S systems it is necessary to promote and enhance sharing of knowledge and concepts between previously separated disciplines that are involved in the analysis of S2S systems. In particular, studying S2S systems implies knowledge and skills from (1) geomorphology, which focuses on the understanding of erosion processes driving landform evolution and sediment fluxes, (2) stratigraphy/sedimentology, which focuses on the nature of sedimentary deposits and their distribution in time and space, and (3) tectonics and structural geology, which set the dimensions, geometry and dynamics of source/transfer areas and sedimentary basins (the sink). Understanding S2S systems also involves other Geosciences disciplines such as paleoclimatology and geochemistry, because they allow quantifying the factors controlling S2S systems dynamics (climatic controls on erosion, solid vs solute fluxes, etc.). The sedimentary record captures Earth’s environmental evolution through interactions with humans. Developing innovative strategies for shaping a sustainable future and responsible growth requires a holistic understanding of Earth’s resources and our impact on the environment that can be informed by the sedimentary archives.
The aim of this general session is to invite contributions from all S2S-related research fields in order to foster connections around a central theme and kickstart the emergence of a European S2S research community. In addition, we propose to use this session to initiate discussion on developing a strategy for S2S training of early-stage researchers to enable them to address the sedimentary system from source to sink and inform them of potential career opportunities in both the academic and non-academic sectors. We welcome all S2S-related and environmental signal propagation contributions, and in particular those addressing 1) perennial S2S dynamics in response to long-term tectonic and climatic signals in deep time, 2) transient S2S dynamics in response to short-term signals and extreme events, 3) generic S2S models inspired by nature, 4) relationships and feedbacks between human and S2S systems, 5) global to regional scale source-to-sink systems and the economic benefits of thinking in this mindset, and 6) innovative S2S training in academia and industry.

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Co-organized by GM4/SSP3, co-sponsored by IAS
Convener: Francois Guillocheau | Co-conveners: Jean Braun, Charlotte FillonECSECS, Benjamin Gréselle, Tor Somme
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
TS9.3

Active tectonics and volcano-tectonic processes are related to earthquakes, fracturing, fault motion (such as creeping), volcanic eruptions, caldera or flank collapse and magmatic intrusions, such as dyking. Satellite data using optical or thermal sensors provide first order information about faulting and volcanic activity, however, there is a resolution gap below the meter-scale, critical to detect and analyse small structures over broad areas and to better assess how faults, magma intrusions and collapses nucleate and evolve. During large deformations (earthquakes, dyke intrusions, collapses), the near-field area where satellite radar signal (InSAR) becomes incoherent remains poorly studied. In addition, classical field surveys and data collection are, very often, not feasible due to difficult logistic condition, hazardous accesses and/or inaccessible areas. Therefore, there is a need to collect higher resolution data to better understand faulting and volcanic processes at scales from cm to several meters, that complement classical field studies and satellite data. The scientific community has adopted modern direct and indirect methods to develop in the last decade, like the Structure from Motion (SfM) techniques.
SfM techniques have been applied using imagery acquired from field and aerial survey, using cameras and mobile phones, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs, i.e. drones), balloons, airplanes and helicopters. This technique produces digital surface models (DSM), ortho-mosaic imagery, dense point clouds and 3D models, creating a high-resolution environment reconstruction for a single outcrop or a wide area. The session will focus on the application of the SfM techniques for research in the field of structural geology, with particular regard to active tectonics and volcano-tectonic processes. The session covers, without being limited to, the following topics: i) case studies where the SfM has been employed; ii) SfM methods, 3D reconstruction and successive analysis; iii) innovative application for SfM for survey, such as ground deformation analysis; iv) integration and comparison of SfM-derived, field and satellite data; v) new tools and methods for data analysis on SfM-derived models; and vi) future works and applications of SfM techniques.

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Co-organized by GMPV9
Convener: Fabio Luca BonaliECSECS | Co-conveners: Fabio MarcheseECSECS, Joël Ruch, Daniele TrippaneraECSECS, Malcolm Whitworth
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
TS9.4

The Arabian Plate recorded several plate reorganizations from the Neoproterozoic to present, including the Angudan Orogeny, Late Paleozoic rifting and Alpine Orogeny. Active tectonics are framing the Arabian Plate and produce a variety of structures including extensional structures related to rifting of the Red Sea and Gulf and Aden, strike-slip structures at the Dead Sea and Owen transform faults and compressive structures related to the Zagros-Makran collision zone. The Arabian Peninsula contains the planet’s largest hydrocarbon reservoirs owing to its geological history as passive margin of Gondwana during the Permo-Mesozoic. Moreover, the Semail Ophiolite as largest exposed ophiolite on Earth offers a unique example of large scale obductions and overthrusted sedimentary basins. This and the spectacular outcrop conditions make the Arabian Peninsula an important and versatile study area. Ongoing research and new methods shed new light on, e.g., mountain building processes and its geomorphological expression as well as hydrocarbon development/migration.

We invite contributions that utilize structural, geophysical, tectonically, geochronological, geomorphological, sedimentary, geochemical/mineralogical, and field geological studies from the Arabian Peninsula and surrounding mountain belts and basins. These studies may include topics dealing with structures/basin analyses of any scale and from all tectonic settings ranging from the Neoproterozoic until today.

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Convener: Frank Mattern | Co-conveners: Christopher Bailey, Ivan Callegari, Andreas Scharf
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
GM9.1

The coupling between tectonics, climate and surface processes governs the dynamics of mountain belts and basins. First order constraints on this coupling are provided by geomorphic and sedimentary records, including longitudinal river profiles, fluvial terraces, downstream fining trends, growth strata, sediment provenance, sequence stratigraphy, and changing depositional environments. Moreover, the increasing integration of geochronological methods for quantifying erosion rates and source-to-sink sediment transfer with landscape evolution, stratigraphic, climatic, and tectonic models allows to advance our understanding of the interactions between surface processes, climate and tectonic deformation.

We invite contributions that use geomorphic and/or sedimentary records to understand tectonic deformation, climate histories, and surface processes, and welcome studies that address their interactions and couplings at a range of spatial and temporal scales. In particular, we encourage coupled catchment-basin studies that take advantage of numerical/physical modelling, geochemical tools for quantifying rates of surface processes (cosmogenic nuclides, low-temperature thermochronology, luminescence dating) and high resolution digital topographic and subsurface data. We also encourage field or subsurface structural and geomorphic studies of landscape evolution, sedimentary patterns and provenance in deformed settings, and invite contributions that address the role of surface processes in modulating rates of deformation and tectonic style, or of tectonics modulating the response of landscapes to climate change.

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Co-organized by TS9
Convener: Dirk Scherler | Co-conveners: Anneleen Geurts, Duna Roda-BoludaECSECS, Alex Whittaker
Displays
| Attendance Tue, 05 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST), Attendance Tue, 05 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)

TS10 – Modelling tectonic processes

TS10.2

Quantitative analysis tools have become increasingly common in structural geology. Imaging techniques such as computed tomography are used to build highly accurate, three-dimensional models of geological structures. Structural measurements can be facilitated and often accelerated owing to photogrammetric methods of reconstructing the studied outcrops. Geological structures can then be classified using statistical methods. Experimental, analytical, and numerical techniques can be used to develop quantitative mechanical models of rock deformation processes, which are often coupled to chemical, hydrological or thermal processes. With the advent of modern computing power, high-resolution models and systematic simulations are nowadays feasible.

Public information:
In this session, we want to bridge the gap between observational methods and models through quantitative analysis/modelling. The displays are grouped into observational methods, methods that link the observations to processes, numerical models of deformation processes and link between different processes with theory and experiments.

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Convener: Bernhard Grasemann | Co-conveners: Marcin Dabrowski, Stefan Markus Schmalholz, Marcel Thielmann
Displays
| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
TS10.3

Geologic processes are generally too slow, too rare, or too deep to be observed in-situ and to be monitored with a resolution high enough to understand their dynamics. Analogue experiments and numerical simulation have thus become an integral part of the Earth explorer's toolbox to select, formulate, and test hypotheses on the origin and evolution of geological phenomena.

To foster synergy between the rather independently evolving experimentalists and modellers we provide a multi-disciplinary platform to discuss research on tectonics, structural geology, rock mechanics, geodynamics, volcanology, geomorphology, and sedimentology.

We therefore invite contributions demonstrating the state-of-the-art in analogue and numerical / analytical modelling on a variety of spatial and temporal scales, varying from earthquakes, landslides and volcanic eruptions to sedimentary processes, plate tectonics and landscape evolution. We especially welcome those presentations that discuss model strengths and weaknesses, challenge the existing limits, or compare/combine the different modelling techniques to realistically simulate and better understand the Earth's behaviour.

Public information:
TS10.3/GD10.5/GM9.6
Analogue and numerical modelling of tectonic processes

By: Frank Zwaan, Fabio Corbi, Ágnes Király, Valentina Magni, Michael Rudolf
Link: https://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2020/session/34918
___________________________________________________________________


Dear participants of EGU session TS10.3 on modelling of tectonic processes,

We will start the discussion at 10:45 CET on Monday 4 May, and it will last until 12:30 CET, although the chat will remain active for 30 min more.

This is how we plan to carry on the session:

• Every contribution will get about 5-10 minutes of discussion
• The conveners will introduce the contribution (title, authors,..)
• The presenting authors will give a short summary/introduction (2-3 sentences) of their work (@ authors, please prepare these in advance to ensure a smooth transition).
• Discussion with participants


If time permits, we will have a more general discussion after all contributions have been presented.

Here’s the order of the presentations:

• Withers & Cruden
• Hughes et al.
• Noguera & Marques
• Schöfish et al.
• Mannu et al.
• Maestrelli et al.
• Avila-Paez et al.
• Wang et al.
• Saha et al.
• Henriquet et al.
• Jiménez-Bonilla et al.

We are looking forward to meeting you in the session chat box!

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Co-organized by GD10/GM9
Convener: Frank ZwaanECSECS | Co-conveners: Fabio CorbiECSECS, Ágnes KirályECSECS, Valentina Magni, Michael Rudolf
Displays
| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
GD10.1

Geological and geophysical data sets are in essence the output of physical processes governing the Earth’s evolution. Such data sets are widely varied and range from the internal structure of the Earth (e.g. seismic tomography), plate kinematics (e.g. GPS), composition of geomaterials (e.g. petrography), estimation of physical conditions and dating of key geological events (e.g. thermobarometry), thermal state of the Earth (e.g heat-flow measurements) to more shallow processes such as natural and “engineered” reservoir dynamics and waste sequestration in the subsurface (e.g. seismic imaging).

Combining the abundant data to process-based numerical models fosters our understanding of the dynamical Earth. Process-based models are powerful tools to predict the evolution of complex natural systems resolving the feedbacks among various physical processes. Integrating high-quality data into direct numerical simulations leads to a constructive workflow to further constrain the key parameters within the models. Innovative inversion strategies, linking forward dynamic models with observables, are topics triggering a growing interest within the community.

The complexity of geological systems arises from their multi-physics nature, as they combine hydrological, thermal, chemical and mechanical. Multi-physics couplings are prone to nonlinear interactions ultimately leading to spontaneous localisation of flow and deformation. Understanding the couplings among those processes requires the development of appropriate tools to capture spontaneous localisation and represents a challenging though essential research direction.

We invite contributions from the following two complementary themes:

#1 Computational advances associated with
- alternative spatial and/or temporal discretisation for existing forward/inverse models
- scalable HPC implementations of new and existing methodologies (GPUs / multi-core)
- solver and preconditioner developments
- AI / Machine learning-based approaches
- code and methodology comparisons (“benchmarks”)
- open source implementations for the community

#2 Physics advances associated with
- development of partial differential equations to describe geological processes
- inversion strategies and adjoint-based modelling
- numerical model validation through comparison with observables (data)
- scientific discovery enabled by 2D and 3D modelling
- utilisation of coupled models to explore nonlinear interactions

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Co-organized by EMRP1/SM7/TS10
Convener: Ludovic RässECSECS | Co-conveners: Marie BocherECSECS, Thibault Duretz, Boris Kaus, Dave May, Georg ReuberECSECS, Sabrina SanchezECSECS, Ylona van DintherECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)

TS11 – Imaging tectonic and geologic structures

TS11.1

Understanding the structure, architecture and tectonic evolution of a given region is of great importance to assess hydrocarbon prospectivity, since it provides significant informations on: heat-flow, the geometry and timing of accommodation space, the trap type and its activity.
The session aims at showing how different geophysical prospecting methods can be applied in structural geology and tectonics in order to obtain the best possible models that
allow to:
- better define and assess the exploration potential of specific regions, based on their tectonic history.
- understand and construct tectonic and structural models for a given area.

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Co-organized by ERE3
Convener: Mohammed FARFOUR | Co-conveners: Olga Hachay, Said GACI
Displays
| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
TS11.2

Geological models are key to our understanding of the subsurface by providing both visual and quantitative context. But accurately modeling the significant heterogeneities, discontinuities and the uncertainties of geological systems from often sparse data remains challenging. Substantial developments in geomodeling over the past years has helped bridge the gap between input data and resulting geomodel, allowing for the (semi-)automated construction of geomodels, a quicker model validation and rebuilding when new data arrives, as well as an efficient testing of multiple hypotheses. Increasing computing power now also allows for effective stochastic simulation of uncertainties in geomodeling, as well as the integration of probabilistic inference frameworks and geophysical inversions. Machine learning approaches can be used in every step of the geomodeling pipeline to enhance the process: from automated input data extraction and classification to probabilistic model selection.

We seek here contributions from all geoscientists using 3-D geological modeling methods, as well as novel developments to construct these models, to quantify and communicate uncertainties, highlighting existing challenges and future developments, including integrating geological modeling into geophysical inversions. Of special interest are also approaches to combine and enhance geomodeling with machine learning methods. Applications can be in any field of solid earth sciences to address scientific questions throughout the lithosphere or anthroposphere.

Public information:
Detailed information and an updated schedule are available in a google document:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1D_vRA5nXlocUF3JLIOEm0g3bdjc4scf_-3uSOEKok04/edit?usp=sharing

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Convener: Alexander SchaafECSECS | Co-conveners: Clare Bond, Miguel de la VargaECSECS, Florian Wellmann
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
TS11.3

Seismic data analysis and interpretation is the key tool enabling the unravelling of the geometry and evolution of subsurface geology.
In the last decades, significant improvements in the acquisition and processing techniques have been combined with a growing coverage of high-resolution and broadband frequency seismic data, including the public release of large volumes of 2D-3D hydrocarbon industry-sourced data. This led to shedding genuine new light on the subsurface geology of large portions of the Earth’s continental margins, and enabled improved quantitative rock property parametrization.
In addition, seismic reflection data have recently appealed to an ever-growing scientific audience, including exploration geoscientists, marine geologists, seismic geomorphologists, stratigraphers and structural geologists. This growing community has been collectively working towards the integrated application of seismic interpretation techniques, including seismic attribute analysis, for industrial purposes as well as for environmental and academic research studies.
In this fast-developing context, it is fundamental to share the knowledge between different research and application approaches. Therefore, the aim of this session is to provide the state-of-the-art and new prospective in seismic data analysis and quantitative subsurface characterization for structural geology and tectonics, but also for exploration seismology, marine geology, seismic geomorphology, stratigraphy, etc.
We thus invite submissions that aim to present new insights in the seismic interpretation of: i) shallow high-resolution seismic data; ii) deep industrial subsurface data (e.g., for hydrocarbon exploration); and iii) ultra-deep lithospheric seismic data. Studies integrating different approaches and disciplines are particularly welcomed.

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Co-organized by GD4/SM4/SSP2
Convener: Vittorio Scisciani | Co-convener: Stefano PatrunoECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
GD4.2

International Lithosphere Program (ILP) has since 1980 been initiating major international, multidisciplinary research programmes to elucidate the nature, dynamics, origin and evolution of the lithosphere. ILP has taken initiative to more than 70 programmes within its four research themes: (1) Geoscience of Global Change, (2) Contemporary Dynamics and Deep Processes, (3) Continental Lithosphere and (4) Oceanic Lithosphere. Example programmes initiated by ILP include World Stress Map, Global Strain Rate Map, Global Seismic Hazard Assessment Map, Seismic Hazards and Megacities, Global Impact project, International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP), and a series of Global Geoscience Transects and programmes. Present programmes focus on integrated mapping of lithosphere physical parameters, lithosphere dynamics including the fate of subducted lithosphere and deformation of continental lithosphere, response of the lithosphere to surface processes including changes in climate and erosion/deposition dynamics, mineral resources, and seismic risk. ILP promotes high class science in combination with community services through the Evgueni Burov medal for mid-career scientists and the Flinn-Hart Award for outstanding early-career scientists, which are awarded during the UGU annual meeting. The activities of ILP seeks to achieve a balance between: "addressing societal needs" in regard to e.g. natural catastrophes, resource exploration and environmental protection; and "satisfying scientific curiosity" in regard to global and regional processes affecting the lithosphere. This symposium presents some of the ILP activities.
In particular, we invite, in particular multidisciplinary, contributions which focus on the structure and evolution of the continental crust and upper mantle and on the nature of mantle discontinuities. The latter include, but are not limited to, the mid-lithosphere discontinuity (MLD), the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), and the mantle transition zone, as imaged by various seismological techniques and interpreted within interdisciplinary approaches. Papers with focus on the structure of the crust and the nature of the Moho are also welcome. Methodologically, the contributions will include studies based on seismic, thermal, gravity, petrological, and/or electro-magnetic data interpretations.

Confirmed invited speakers: Sierd Cloetingh, Harsh Gupta, Sergei Lebedev and Taras Gerya.

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Co-organized by SM4/TS11
Convener: Alexey Shulgin | Co-conveners: Hans Thybo, Magdalena Scheck-Wenderoth, Alexander Rudloff, Lev Vinnik
Displays
| Attendance Tue, 05 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)

TS12 – Rates of tectonic processes

TS12.1

Plate tectonic processes and associated rates of deformation can be quantified using geomorphological and sedimentary evidence in actively deformed landscapes. A variety of geomorphic markers (e.g., topography and rivers, fluvial deposits, marine terraces) and sedimentary archives (e.g., syntectonic sedimentation, stratigraphic evidence) can be used to constrain rates and dates of tectonic deformation and its processes. Any of these and their combinations, when used in key natural laboratories at adequate time spans, can provide essential clues to understand the tectonic activity and large-scale geodynamic evolution of tectonic plates, and unravel the dynamic changes and tip-points in plate boundary conditions.

We invite contributions that aim to understand the dynamics and evolution of active plate boundaries and deforming plate interiors through geomorphic and/or sedimentary evidence. We welcome all types of studies regardless of their methodology, and especially interdisciplinary efforts, that use geomorphic and sedimentary records to quantify the rates of active deformation and tectonic events, at key sites and across various spatial and temporal scales.

Public information:
Welcome everyone to “Geomorphic and sedimentary records of active tectonics” [TS12.1]!
Thank you for attending!

We, the conveners, would like to thank all contributing authors, and in particular, everyone who uploaded a Display. We really appreciate it!

The life-chat will start at 10.45 and we will continue to discuss Displays until 12.30.
Thereafter, the chat will remain open for discussion if you want.

----------------------------------------------------------
Schedule for the Live-Chat (Thursday 7th of May)

10:45-10:50 Introduction
10:50-10:57 Ed Rhodes
10:57-11:04 Rajeeb Lochan Mishra
11:04-11:11 Paul Zemann
11:11-11:18 Bernhard Salcher
11:18-11:25 Oswald Malcles
11:25-11:32 Tarik Kernif
11:32-11:39 Haralambos Kranis
11:39-11:46 Roland Freisleben
11:46-11:53 Hao Liang
11:53-12:00 Ping Huang
12:00-12:07 Gerben de Jager
12:07-12:14 Debora Duarte
12:14-12:21 Shao-I Kao
12:21-12:30 Final Discussion

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We would like to organize the session as follows:

- A ca. 7 min time slot will be allocated to each of the 13 contributors that have uploaded a Display This should not only allow for some discussion of the Displays but also leave 10 minutes at the end of the session for the discussion of remaining questions.

- The conveners introduce the contribution

- The presenting author shortly introduces the Display (@authors, please prepare these in advance to ensure a smooth transition and include your email address!)

- Discussion with participants starts
For questions, please use @name to address the correct person.

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Co-organized by GD6/GM9/SSP1
Convener: Gino de GelderECSECS | Co-conveners: Lucilla Benedetti, David Fernández-BlancoECSECS, Martine Simoes
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)

TS13 – Deformation unrelated to regional displacements: salt tectonics, impact geology, magma emplacement

TS13.1

Salt basins present some of the most spectacular geological structures on Earth. They are remarkably important for mineral and hydrocarbon exploration, comprising the world’s largest and most prolific hydrocarbon provinces, as well as for nuclear waste and CO2 repositories. Due to salt’s unique ability to flow as a viscous fluid over typical geological strain-rates, it produces complex and variable deformational styles within sedimentary basins, which are critical for understanding basin evolution and prospectivity. The uniqueness and inherent complexity associated with salt tectonics make it one of the most interesting and challenging topics in basin studies, usually requiring an integrated multi-discipline approach. Recent advances in seismic imaging and modelling (numerical and physical), coupled with a growing database of outcrop analogues have, nonetheless, allowed the development of novel concepts in salt tectonics and more detailed analyses of its kinematics, dynamics, internal deformation and interaction with sedimentation. This session explores the new challenges and advances in salt basins worldwide, from salt deposition to deformation, to improve the current knowledge of salt tectonics and basin evolution. We invite abstracts from a variety of datasets, locations and geological settings, to cover academic and industrial topics including:
• Subsurface, outcrop and modelling studies of salt basins
• Salt tectonics in extensional, contractional and strike-slip settings
• Salt-bearing passive margins
• Evaporite deposition and the interaction between intra-salt lithological heterogeneities on salt deformation.
• Thin- and thick-skinned salt tectonics
• Advances in seismic imaging, processing and interpretation in salt basins globally
• The interaction between halokinesis and sediment routing, minibasin stratigraphy and implications for subsurface energy exploration potential.

Public information:
• We will discuss displays in the order they appear in the programme, which may be different to that shown down the side of the chat.
• All abstracts listed the the session summary will be discussed, if authors are not present we will move on to the next author
• Depending on amount of authors present we will have between 6-8 minutes to discuss each display
• Authors are asked to prepare a short (1-4 sentence) introduction to themselves and their work, following this question will be taken from the floor.
• Time permitting we can return to previous abstracts/displays at the end or have a more broad discussion on the future of salt tectonics.
• We ask authors to promote their presentations and the session on social media etc. using #ShareEGU20 and #saltsaturday

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Convener: Leonardo Muniz PichelECSECS | Co-conveners: Zoe CumberpatchECSECS, Oriol Ferrer, Virginie Gaullier, Gaia TravanECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
GMPV9.5

The session deals with the documentation and modelling of the tectonic, deformation, and geodetic features of any type of volcanic area, on Earth and in the Solar System. The focus is on advancing our understanding on any type of deformation of active and non-active volcanoes, on the associated behaviours, and the implications for hazards. We welcome contributions based on results from fieldwork, remote-sensing studies, geodetic and geophysical measurements, analytical, analogue and numerical simulations, and laboratory studies of volcanic rocks. We also welcome multidisciplinary studies, especially those that integrate data collected at different scales (e.g. laboratory and field data).
Studies may be focused at the regional scale, investigating the tectonic setting responsible for and controlling volcanic activity, both along divergent and convergent plate boundaries, as well in intraplate settings. At a more local scale, all types of surface deformation in volcanic areas are of interest, such as elastic inflation and deflation, or anelastic processes, including caldera and flank collapses. Deeper, sub-volcanic deformation studies, concerning the emplacement of intrusions, as sills, dikes, and laccoliths, are most welcome.
We also particularly welcome geophysical data aimed at understanding magmatic processes during volcano unrest. These include geodetic studies obtained mainly through GPS and InSAR, as well as studies that model these data to image sources.


The session includes, but is not restricted to, the following topics:
• volcanism and regional tectonics;
• formation of magma chambers, laccoliths, and other intrusions;
• dyke and sill propagation, emplacement, and arrest;
• earthquakes and eruptions;
• caldera collapse, resurgence, and unrest;
• flank collapse;
• volcano deformation monitoring;
• volcano deformation and hazard mitigation;
• volcano unrest;
• mechanical properties of rocks in volcanic areas.

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Co-organized by GD4/NH2/TS13
Convener: Valerio Acocella | Co-conveners: Agust Gudmundsson, Michael Heap, Sigurjon Jonsson, Virginie Pinel
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST), Attendance Fri, 08 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)

TS14 – Plate Tectonics and the evolution of the Earth and other Planets

TS14.1

The pioneering seafloor mapping and visualization by Marie Tharp played a key role in the acceptance of the plate tectonic theory. Her physiographic maps, published with B. Heezen, covered the Earth’s oceans and revealed with astonishing accuracy the submarine landscape. She exposed the topography of a seafloor that turned out not to be flat, displaying instead features such as seamounts and volcanic chains, trenches, mid-ocean ridges, and transform faults. Marie Tharp co-authored the first papers describing the major fracture zones in the Central Atlantic (Chain, Romanche, Vema), and her work directly contributed to the recognition of the role of mid-ocean ridges in plate tectonics and oceanic accretion.

To honour Marie Tharp’s profound and lasting contribution to plate tectonics and marine goesciences, this session seeks contributions addressing plate tectonics in the oceans, based primarily on information from seafloor mapping, including regular or high resolution bathymetry, seafloor imagery (sonar or optical) at all scales, geophysical imaging of the seafloor, in addition to satellite altimetry, and in situ observations (robots or submersibles). Results of seafloor sampling, seismic imaging, seismicity studies or in-situ monitoring are also very welcome. Contributions may address the role of faults, seafloor volcanism, magmatism, and hydrothermal circulations, in the construction and evolution of the ocean crust and lithosphere from mid-ocean ridges and transform faults, to mid-plate domains and subductions. We seek contributions at all scales, from regional studies to a global scope, as that pioneered by Marie Tharp.

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Co-organized by GD6
Convener: Mathilde Cannat | Co-conveners: Susanne Buiter, Javier Escartin, Philipp Brandl
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
TS14.2

Tectonic models represent hypothesised approximations of past geological events that best fit and explain a pre-defined collection of data points. Incorporation of geological observations with an understanding and consideration of geodynamic concepts, geological processes, and physical properties of geological materials ensures that empirical models are consistent with physics and mechanics, and that numerical models are consistent with field observations and petrological constraints. Integrating these constraints and concepts within a plate kinematic framework that considers the size, distribution and past and present motions of tectonic plates ensures that models are consistent with global plate tectonics. Incorporating this information with interpretations of the distribution of subducted slabs and plumes in the upper and lower mantle allows for construction of tectonic models that consider the global tectonic-mantle system. We welcome state-of-the-art, multi-disciplinary, and multi-scale studies that combine geological and geophysical constraints from the bedrock record with interpretations of deep mantle structure and/or plate kinematic datasets to investigate geodynamic events of past and present. These may include, but are not limited to studies of rifting and ocean spreading, subduction, orogeny and terrane accretion, and dynamic topography. We expect this session to include a diverse range of multi-disciplinary studies united by a common goal of understanding the geological evolution of our planet’s tectonic-mantle system.

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Co-organized by GD1/SM2/SSP2
Convener: Andrew ParsonsECSECS | Co-conveners: Dennis Brown, Mat DomeierECSECS, Stephen Johnston, Lucia Perez-DiazECSECS
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| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
GD4.1

Structure and dynamics of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system is one of the key questions for understanding geological processes. Constraining the styles, mechanisms and fabrics evolution in the crust and the upper mantle come from both direct and indirect observations with the use of variety of methods. Seismological studies focusing on anisotropy have successfully improved our knowledge of deformation patterns, acting both at present as well as in the past. When combined with tomographic models, velocity anisotropy can shed light on the geometry, structure, and dynamics of deformation in the lithosphere and the asthenosphere. Sophisticated geodynamic modelling and laboratory experiments enhance our understanding of flow patterns in the upper mantle and their effects on vertical motions of the crust and the lithosphere. Combining with inferences from seismic anisotropy, these methods have the potential to reveal mechanisms that create deformation-induced features such as shape preferred orientation (SPO) and lattice-preferred orientation (LPO), which created in the past or during the last deforming processes. Structural and kinematic characterization of deformation events by geometric and kinematic analyses infer the direction and magnitude of the tectonic forces involved in driving deformation within crust and upper mantle. Additionally, both physical analogue and numerical modelling foster our understanding of complex 3D-plate interaction on various timescales, controlled through the degree of plate coupling and the rheology of the lithosphere.
However, additional work is required to better integrate various experimental and modelling techniques, and to link them with multi-scale observations. The session aims at bringing together inferences from different disciplines that focus on structure and deformation of the lithosphere and the sub-lithospheric upper mantle as well as on the dynamics and nature of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system. The main goal is to demonstrate the potential of different methods, and to share ideas of how we can collaboratively study lithosphere structure, and how the present-day fabrics of the lithosphere relates to the contemporary deformation processes and ongoing dynamics within the asthenospheric mantle. Contributions from studies employing seismic anisotropy observation, geodynamical modelling (analogue and numerical), structural geology, and mineral and rock physics are welcome.

Invited Speakers:
Eric Debayle (Laboratoire de Geologie de Lyon-Terre, Planètes, Environnement, CNRS, France)
Christof Völksen (Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Germany)

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Co-organized by SM4/TS14
Convener: Ehsan QorbaniECSECS | Co-conveners: Irene Bianchi, Boris Kaus, Jaroslava Plomerova, Ernst Willingshofer
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| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
GD7.1

The Arctic realm hosts vast extended continental shelves bordering old land masses, one of the largest submarine Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) -the Alpha-Mendeleev Ridge - of Mesozoic age, and the slowest mid-ocean spreading ridge (the Gakkel Ridge) on the globe. Extreme variations in the evolution of landscapes and geology reflect the tug-of-war between the formation of new oceans, like the North Atlantic, and the destruction of older oceans: the South Anyui, Angayucham and North Pacific, which were accompanied by rifting, collision, uplift and subsidence. The causal relationships between the deep-mantle and surface processes in the Circum-Arcic region remain unclear. Geoscientific information on the relationship between the onshore geology and offshore ridges and basins in combination with variations in the mantle is the key for any deeper understanding of the entire Arctic Ocean.
This session provides a forum for discussions of a variety of problems linked to the Circum-Arctic geodynamics and aims to bring together a diversity of sub-disciplines including plate tectonics, mantle tomography, seismology, geodynamic modelling, igneous and structural geology, geophysical imaging, sedimentology, and geochemistry. Particularly encouraged are papers that address lithospheric-mantle interactions in the North Atlantic, the Arctic and North Pacific regions, mantle dynamics and vertical and horizontal motion of crustal blocks and consequences for paleogeography. As geologic and tectonic models are inherently tied with changes in the oceanographic and climatic development of the Arctic, we also invite studies that focus on the interplay between these processes and across timescales. Lastly, we would like to invite contributions from studies concerning the implications of how the Arctic’s geography and geology are portrayed by modern data and issues related to jurisdiction and sovereign rights with particular focus on the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea.

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Co-organized by CL4/GMPV11/SM4/TS14
Convener: Grace E. ShephardECSECS | Co-conveners: Frances DeeganECSECS, Karolina Kośmińska, Rebekka Steffen
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| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
GD6.1

Geoscientists have long assumed that variations in the Earth’s topography are primarily due to variations within the lithosphere (density, thickness, flexural rigidity), and are compensated isostatically within the asthenosphere. But geodynamic considerations predict that mantle convection should cause long wavelength deflections of the Earth’s surface, with length scales > 500 km and vertical amplitudes as large as 1 to 2 km. The largest deflections seem to be associated with subduction zones and plumes. These long-wavelength deflects are called “dynamic topography” given that they are caused by dynamic pressures associated with convection.

Over the last decade, there has been increasing interest in resolving the long-term evolution of dynamic topography. Methods include global dynamic models; kinematic reconstruction of plate motions and plate boundaries; geomorphic and stratigraphic studies of basins, coastal terraces, and rivers; paleotopography studies using paleotemperature or precipitation isotopes, erosion studies using thermochronology; landform studies; and stratigraphic analysis at continental scales to map hiatus area. Geodynamic methods have expanded now to include adjoint inversion methods, which allow a more optimal integration between observations and theory. The simultaneous growth of observations and theoretical capabilities provides us with unprecedented opportunity to test the underlying assumptions of dynamic Earth models. This transdisciplinary session brings together observational and theoretical scientists to discuss the scope and format of established and nascent convection related observables, and welcomes contributions that highlight the noisy nature of observables while exploring methods to handle the impact of uncertainty in the geodynamic data assimilation framework.

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Co-organized by TS14
Convener: Lorenzo ColliECSECS | Co-conveners: Prof. Dr. Ulrich Anton Glasmacher, Mark Brandon, Hans-Peter Bunge, Anke Friedrich, Francois Guillocheau, Kurt Stüwe, Massimiliano Zattin
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| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
GD6.2

Since the Neoproterozoic breakup of the supercontinent Rodinia, continental fragments episodically rifted from their original location and systematically drifted towards more northerly positions, culminating in the Late Palaeozoic amalgamation of the supercontinent Pangaea. In this session we focus on the processes responsible for the transportation of terranes from Gondwana to the northern continental masses (Baltica, Laurentia, and later Laurussia) before, during and after the collision between Laurussia and Gondwana and the amalgamation of Pangaea. We welcome multi-disciplinary (tectonics, geodynamics, basin analysis, palaeomagnetism, palaeogeography, plate reconstruction, etc.) contributions dealing with i) the geodynamic evolution (rift-drift-accretion) of terranes such as Ganderia, Avalonia, Carolinia, Meguma, Armorica, Moesia, North China, South China, etc., ii) the fate of intervening oceans (Iapetus, Rheic, Palaeotethys, Neotethys, etc.) and iii) the geodynamic drivers of their respective evolutions.
Contribution to IGCP project No. 648: Supercontinent Cycles and Global Geodynamics.

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Co-organized by EMRP3/TS14
Convener: Cecilio Quesada | Co-conveners: Brendan Murphy, Daniel Pastor-Galán, Weihua YaoECSECS
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| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
GD1.1

Processes responsible for formation and development of the early Earth (> 2500Ma) are not
well understood and strongly debated, reflecting in part the poorly preserved, altered, and
incomplete nature of the geological record from this time.
In this session we encourage the presentation of new approaches and models for the development of Earth's early crust and mantle and their methods of interaction. We encourage contributions from the study of the preserved rock archive as well as geodynamic models of crustal and mantle dynamics so as to better understand the genesis and evolution of continental crust and the stabilization of cratons.
We invite abstracts from a large range of disciplines including geodynamics, geology, geochemistry, and petrology but also studies of early atmosphere, biosphere and early life relevant to this period of Earth history.

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Co-organized by AS4/CL1/GMPV3/TS14, co-sponsored by EAG
Convener: Ria Fischer | Co-conveners: Peter A. Cawood, Nicholas Gardiner, Antoine Rozel, Jeroen van Hunen, Martin Whitehouse, Eleanor JenningsECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST), Attendance Mon, 04 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)