EGU21-10244
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu21-10244
EGU General Assembly 2021
© Author(s) 2021. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Effect of capillary pressure and geomechanics on multiphase fluid flow in rocks

Denis Anuprienko1,2, Viktoriya Yarushina3, and Yury Podladchikov4,5,6
Denis Anuprienko et al.
  • 1Nuclear Safety Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russian Federation (denis-anuprienko@yandex.ru)
  • 2Marchuk Institute of Numerical Mathematics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russian Federation
  • 3Institute for Energy Technology, NO-2007 Kjeller, Norway
  • 4Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
  • 5Swiss Geocomputing Centre, University of Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
  • 6Faculty of Mechanics and Mathematics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, 119899, Russian Federation

Understanding interactions between rock and fluids is important for many applications including CO2 storage in the subsurface. Today significant effort is aimed at research on CO2 flow through low-permeable shale formations. In some experiments, CO2 is injected in a shale sample at a constant rate, and the upstream pressure exhibits rise until a certain moment followed by a decline, representing the so called breakthrough phenomenon. After the breakthrough, downstream flux significantly rises. This behavior was thought to be the result of fracture occurence or mechanical effects. 

Here, we present a 3D numerical model of flow through experiments in shale. Our model accounts for poroelastic compaction/decompaction of shale, its time-dependent permeability, and two-phase flow, the fluid phases being CO2 and air. The model also accounts for a capillary entry pressure threshold observed in experiments. The key feature of the model are saturation-based relative permeabilities which result in sharp overall permeability increases as the CO2 moves through the shale sample. The model is implemented for 3D calculations with the finite volume method. Our results show that CO2 breakthrough is a natural outcome of two-phase fluid flow dynamics and does not need a fracture to exhibit pressure behavior observed in experiments.

How to cite: Anuprienko, D., Yarushina, V., and Podladchikov, Y.: Effect of capillary pressure and geomechanics on multiphase fluid flow in rocks, EGU General Assembly 2021, online, 19–30 Apr 2021, EGU21-10244, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu21-10244, 2021.

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