EGU21-12628
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu21-12628
EGU General Assembly 2021
© Author(s) 2021. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Perceptions of Climate Information in the Caribbean: Implications for Adaptation

Denyse Dookie1, Declan Conway2, and Suraje Dessai3
Denyse Dookie et al.
  • 1Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, United Kingdom of Great Britain – England, Scotland, Wales (d.dookie@lse.ac.uk)
  • 2Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, United Kingdom of Great Britain – England, Scotland, Wales (d.conway@lse.ac.uk)
  • 3Sustainability Research Institute, School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom of Great Britain – England, Scotland, Wales (s.dessai@leeds.ac.uk)

Despite an increasing recognition of the value of climate information and broader weather and climate services (WCS) for decision-making, understanding its wider dimensions for effective delivery and use remains an ongoing discussion. In particular, a focus on barriers and enablers of using climate information can be helpful for policy-directed efforts, as this underscores challenges and streamlines strategies for action. For smaller and developing countries with particular vulnerabilities to climate variability and change, and various barriers to climate information/WCS uptake, this is especially true but often limited within research. This paper addresses this research gap by offering perceptions of climate information use in the insular Caribbean. We engaged with 26 potential WCS end-users in the form of region-wide experts and decision-makers who focus on climate adaptation, disaster risk reduction, and resilience, and analysed semi-structured interview responses to understand barriers and enablers of WCS delivery and use within the region. Against a history of projectised adaptation initiatives in the Caribbean, the results highlight that while finance is critical, there is rather a range of interlinked enabling conditions necessary for the effective use of climate information. Caribbean respondents stressed the need for island-contextualised climate information and the importance of adequate human resource capacity, loud voices/climate champions, and effective political and legislative mandates for understanding and using climate information for climate-related decision-making. As well, a factor visualisation illustrates that the practical awareness of climate information for decision-making is closely tied to proactive climate champions, and that available finance should be noted within the context of donor interests. Moving ahead, it is clear that an integrated approach for effective WCS delivery and use is necessary, requiring engaged WCS partnerships amongst multiple stakeholders. The highlighting of such challenges within an under-researched area such as the Caribbean provides insights for developing adaptation strategies within the region, and can also signal critical elements relevant for other small developing countries.

How to cite: Dookie, D., Conway, D., and Dessai, S.: Perceptions of Climate Information in the Caribbean: Implications for Adaptation, EGU General Assembly 2021, online, 19–30 Apr 2021, EGU21-12628, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu21-12628, 2021.

Corresponding presentation materials formerly uploaded have been withdrawn.