EGU21-7667
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu21-7667
EGU General Assembly 2021
© Author(s) 2021. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

What can we learn about small-scale spatial variability of surface ocean dimethylsulfide (DMS) concentrations from high frequency novel measurements?

George Manville1, Paul Halloran1, Tom Bell2, Jane Mulcahy3, Anoop Mahajan4, Shrivardhan Hulswar4, Rafel Simo5, and Marti Gali6
George Manville et al.
  • 1University of Exeter, Exeter, UK
  • 2Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Plymouth, UK
  • 3Met Office, Exeter, UK
  • 4Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Pune, India
  • 5Institut de Ciències del Mar, Barcelona, Spain
  • 6Barcelona Supercomputing Centre, Barcelona, Spain

Analysis of new high frequency dimethylsulfide (DMS) measurements indicates a latitudinal dependence to the patterns of small-scale variability; this points to previously unrecognised drivers of DMS spatial variability. DMS makes a significant contribution to natural marine aerosol. The amount and distribution of preindustrial DMS emissions is important for constraining the influence of anthropogenic aerosol on climate. The impact of variations in seawater DMS concentration on climatological (Lana et al. 2011) flux uncertainty is as large as the choice of gas transfer velocity parameterization. Improving understanding of the spatial variability of seawater DMS will help improve climatological flux estimates. High frequency data enables an assessment of the spatial variability lengthscale of DMS. We use 35 high frequency observational datasets, including measurements from the GSSDD (Global Surface Seawater DMS Database), NAAMES (North Atlantic Aerosol and Marine Ecosystem Study), and SCALE (Southern oCean SeAsonaL Experiment), to assess the variability lengthscale of DMS globally, and in all ocean basins at different stages of the seasonal cycle. We interpret our results within the context of ancillary physical and biogeochemical measurements, which may be potential drivers of the regional variability patterns of DMS concentrations.

How to cite: Manville, G., Halloran, P., Bell, T., Mulcahy, J., Mahajan, A., Hulswar, S., Simo, R., and Gali, M.: What can we learn about small-scale spatial variability of surface ocean dimethylsulfide (DMS) concentrations from high frequency novel measurements?, EGU General Assembly 2021, online, 19–30 Apr 2021, EGU21-7667, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu21-7667, 2021.

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