TS10.1 EDI

Rock deformation continuously rearranges the Earth’s shape. It modifies solid, preexisting rock textures, often in a destructive manner. It can manifest itself in a diversity of ways, ranging from homogeneously distributed to relatively localized. Fluid infiltration and mineral reactions usually accompany/trigger deformation. Dating deformation and its duration is a challenging endeavor, which requires geochemical, petrologic, microstructural and structural characterization in addition to mass spectrometric isotope measurements. In this context, division into pre-, syn-, and post-kinematic mineral growth as well as petrochronological classification is required for a reliable age interpretation.

In this session, we warmly welcome studies that characterize deformation in detail from micro- to macroscopic scale prior to isotopic dating. We would like to discuss innovation, suitability and limitation of the applied method particularly dating deformation rather than metamorphism. We are interested in discussing the significance of the analytical vs. systematic errors in the light of technical improvements enabling analyses of tiny (high spatial resolution) but distinctly different (microtexture) targets with high precision geochronology. Dating of unconventional minerals, systematic sampling/dating strategies of deformed and host rocks and additional geochemical analyses are examples of promising approaches to directly date deformation.

Co-organized by GMPV7
Convener: Susanne SchneiderECSECS | Co-conveners: Matthias Konrad-Schmolke, Igor M. Villa, Christoph von Hagke

Rock deformation continuously rearranges the Earth’s shape. It modifies solid, preexisting rock textures, often in a destructive manner. It can manifest itself in a diversity of ways, ranging from homogeneously distributed to relatively localized. Fluid infiltration and mineral reactions usually accompany/trigger deformation. Dating deformation and its duration is a challenging endeavor, which requires geochemical, petrologic, microstructural and structural characterization in addition to mass spectrometric isotope measurements. In this context, division into pre-, syn-, and post-kinematic mineral growth as well as petrochronological classification is required for a reliable age interpretation.

In this session, we warmly welcome studies that characterize deformation in detail from micro- to macroscopic scale prior to isotopic dating. We would like to discuss innovation, suitability and limitation of the applied method particularly dating deformation rather than metamorphism. We are interested in discussing the significance of the analytical vs. systematic errors in the light of technical improvements enabling analyses of tiny (high spatial resolution) but distinctly different (microtexture) targets with high precision geochronology. Dating of unconventional minerals, systematic sampling/dating strategies of deformed and host rocks and additional geochemical analyses are examples of promising approaches to directly date deformation.