HS2.2.4 EDI

Salinisation of both groundwater and surface water resources is a growing problem, threatening freshwater security for agricultural, domestic and industrial purposes, as well as biodiversity, in many regions of the world. Although the problem of freshwater salinisation is increasingly recognised, there are major research gaps in terms of its impacts, extent and magnitude, particularly at cross-regional to global scales. Both observational, remote sensing and model-driven approaches are needed to improve our understanding of salinisation processes, drivers and impacts across different scales, and to ensure sustainable water resources management today and in the future.

This session aims to bring together scientists working on salinity monitoring (in-situ or remote sensing) data, as well as model-driven studies related to quantifying and predicting historic to future salinisation patterns, drivers and impacts at catchment to global scales. Contributions including - but not limited to - any of the following topics are of particular interest for this session:

- Surface water and groundwater interactions and its effects on salinity dynamics
- Impacts of hydrological extremes and seasonality on salinity levels of freshwater resources
- Human and hydro-climatic drivers of freshwater salinisation across different spatial and temporal scales
- Implications of inland salinity for ecosystem health and sectoral water use
- Applications of surface and/or groundwater in-situ and remote sensing data, and/or data-driven models to determine salinity concentrations across multiple scales
- Global change (e.g. climate change, land use change) impacts on future freshwater salinisation
- Assessment of management and adaptation measures to salinity changes

Convener: Josefin ThorslundECSECS | Co-conveners: Martina Flörke, S. S. Kaushal, Michelle van Vliet

Salinisation of both groundwater and surface water resources is a growing problem, threatening freshwater security for agricultural, domestic and industrial purposes, as well as biodiversity, in many regions of the world. Although the problem of freshwater salinisation is increasingly recognised, there are major research gaps in terms of its impacts, extent and magnitude, particularly at cross-regional to global scales. Both observational, remote sensing and model-driven approaches are needed to improve our understanding of salinisation processes, drivers and impacts across different scales, and to ensure sustainable water resources management today and in the future.

This session aims to bring together scientists working on salinity monitoring (in-situ or remote sensing) data, as well as model-driven studies related to quantifying and predicting historic to future salinisation patterns, drivers and impacts at catchment to global scales. Contributions including - but not limited to - any of the following topics are of particular interest for this session:

- Surface water and groundwater interactions and its effects on salinity dynamics
- Impacts of hydrological extremes and seasonality on salinity levels of freshwater resources
- Human and hydro-climatic drivers of freshwater salinisation across different spatial and temporal scales
- Implications of inland salinity for ecosystem health and sectoral water use
- Applications of surface and/or groundwater in-situ and remote sensing data, and/or data-driven models to determine salinity concentrations across multiple scales
- Global change (e.g. climate change, land use change) impacts on future freshwater salinisation
- Assessment of management and adaptation measures to salinity changes