OS1.6 EDI

The Southern Ocean is a key region for the vertical and lateral exchanges of heat, carbon, and nutrients, with significant past and potential future impacts on the global climate system. However, the role of the Southern Ocean as a sink of anthropogenic carbon and heat, and as a source of natural carbon remains uncertain. Indeed, observations of many aspects of this system are still sparse and the ability to model the complex dynamics governing the air-sea exchange, export and storage of heat and carbon is limited, resulting in large climate projection uncertainties.

To address these knowledge gaps the Southern Ocean has been the subject of recent large-scale observational, theoretical and modelling investigations by several national and international programmes, including SOCCOM, the UK ORCHESTRA and RoSES, and the H2020 programme SO-CHIC, complimented by the IODP and other drilling programmes. These and other large scale efforts such as the CMIP6 simulations have provided insight into the processes governing the Southern Ocean heat and carbon exchanges, their spatial patterns and trends on subannual, multi-decadal and millennial timescales, as well as their potential future modifications under a changing climate.

This session welcomes contributions dealing with the physical, biogeochemical and ecological processes driving the air-sea exchange, export, and storage of heat and carbon in the Southern Ocean under past, present, and future climates. These include (but are not limited to) interior ocean mixing, water mass transformation and transport pathways, the cycling of carbon and nutrients, as well as ocean-ice-atmosphere interactions and fluxes. The session will also discuss the wider implications of changing Southern Ocean heat and carbon exchanges for the lower latitudes and for the global climate.

Convener: Andrew Meijers | Co-conveners: Cara Nissen, Lavinia Patara, Christian Turney

The Southern Ocean is a key region for the vertical and lateral exchanges of heat, carbon, and nutrients, with significant past and potential future impacts on the global climate system. However, the role of the Southern Ocean as a sink of anthropogenic carbon and heat, and as a source of natural carbon remains uncertain. Indeed, observations of many aspects of this system are still sparse and the ability to model the complex dynamics governing the air-sea exchange, export and storage of heat and carbon is limited, resulting in large climate projection uncertainties.

To address these knowledge gaps the Southern Ocean has been the subject of recent large-scale observational, theoretical and modelling investigations by several national and international programmes, including SOCCOM, the UK ORCHESTRA and RoSES, and the H2020 programme SO-CHIC, complimented by the IODP and other drilling programmes. These and other large scale efforts such as the CMIP6 simulations have provided insight into the processes governing the Southern Ocean heat and carbon exchanges, their spatial patterns and trends on subannual, multi-decadal and millennial timescales, as well as their potential future modifications under a changing climate.

This session welcomes contributions dealing with the physical, biogeochemical and ecological processes driving the air-sea exchange, export, and storage of heat and carbon in the Southern Ocean under past, present, and future climates. These include (but are not limited to) interior ocean mixing, water mass transformation and transport pathways, the cycling of carbon and nutrients, as well as ocean-ice-atmosphere interactions and fluxes. The session will also discuss the wider implications of changing Southern Ocean heat and carbon exchanges for the lower latitudes and for the global climate.