HS9.5 EDI

Water and sediments interact at different spatial and temporal scales in freshwaters promoting the development of highly dynamic systems. Erosion, transport and sedimentation are vital processes that shape river morphology. These dynamic processes, in turn, are essential to provide a mosaic of diverse habitat patches for aquatic species and to freshwater ecosystems functioning.
Anthropogenic activities such as flow regulations or dams lead to fragmentation and ecosystem degradation, interfering with natural hydro-morphodynamics and affecting aquatic ecology. In Europe, large efforts are set to restore disturbed river sections to meet the goals of a good ecological status, set by the Water Framework Directive. Experience to date indicates that integrating both physical and ecological processes in river restoration efforts is critical to freshwater ecosystems conservation. In this context, the interdisciplinary field of Ecohydraulics represents the link between abiotic components (e.g. hydrology, hydraulics, geomorphology) and riverine biota (e.g. vegetation, fish, macroinvertebrates). Advances in this field of research are therefore paramount to make future management decisions in freshwater systems.
This session aims at integrating the core research disciplines forming Ecohydraulics, from hydrology, hydraulics, fluvial geomorphology, and biology, but also social aspects to ensure a holistic assessment of rivers, lakes and reservoirs, and to enable the implementation of sustainable restoration measures.
We welcome both fundamental and applied research, presenting approaches at different spatio-temporal scales. They may include holistic tools and methods to improve the assessment, prediction and management of restoration and mitigation measures in aquatic systems, with a focus on the hydrological, fluvial geomorphological, and biological interactions.
Contributions may refer, but are not restricted, to:
- sediment transport, fluvial dynamics and sediment budgets in rivers
- risk analysis and mitigation in fluvial systems
- reservoir sedimentation: processes and management
- large wood and microplastic in aquatic systems
- nature-compatible river engineering and river development
- nature based solutions
- revitalization of river systems (from successful studies to failures in restoration)
- tools and methods (concepts, measurements, monitoring, modelling) to understand the interactions between fluvial processes and their biological responses

Co-organized by BG4/GM3
Convener: Stefan Haun | Co-conveners: Roser Casas-Mulet, Markus Noack, Lennart SchönfelderECSECS

Water and sediments interact at different spatial and temporal scales in freshwaters promoting the development of highly dynamic systems. Erosion, transport and sedimentation are vital processes that shape river morphology. These dynamic processes, in turn, are essential to provide a mosaic of diverse habitat patches for aquatic species and to freshwater ecosystems functioning.
Anthropogenic activities such as flow regulations or dams lead to fragmentation and ecosystem degradation, interfering with natural hydro-morphodynamics and affecting aquatic ecology. In Europe, large efforts are set to restore disturbed river sections to meet the goals of a good ecological status, set by the Water Framework Directive. Experience to date indicates that integrating both physical and ecological processes in river restoration efforts is critical to freshwater ecosystems conservation. In this context, the interdisciplinary field of Ecohydraulics represents the link between abiotic components (e.g. hydrology, hydraulics, geomorphology) and riverine biota (e.g. vegetation, fish, macroinvertebrates). Advances in this field of research are therefore paramount to make future management decisions in freshwater systems.
This session aims at integrating the core research disciplines forming Ecohydraulics, from hydrology, hydraulics, fluvial geomorphology, and biology, but also social aspects to ensure a holistic assessment of rivers, lakes and reservoirs, and to enable the implementation of sustainable restoration measures.
We welcome both fundamental and applied research, presenting approaches at different spatio-temporal scales. They may include holistic tools and methods to improve the assessment, prediction and management of restoration and mitigation measures in aquatic systems, with a focus on the hydrological, fluvial geomorphological, and biological interactions.
Contributions may refer, but are not restricted, to:
- sediment transport, fluvial dynamics and sediment budgets in rivers
- risk analysis and mitigation in fluvial systems
- reservoir sedimentation: processes and management
- large wood and microplastic in aquatic systems
- nature-compatible river engineering and river development
- nature based solutions
- revitalization of river systems (from successful studies to failures in restoration)
- tools and methods (concepts, measurements, monitoring, modelling) to understand the interactions between fluvial processes and their biological responses